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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1905

THE RANCH Office: 576 Col man Building MILLER FREEMAN Editor and Proprietor Associate Editors F. WALDEN. H. I*. BLANCHARD MRS. 8. a. WEBSTER. Issued the First and Fifteenth Each Month Subscription, In advance, one year 60 cents; six months, 30 cents. If on time, subscriptions will be $1. Seattle subscrib ers are required to pay $1.00 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted In every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commissions and sal aries paid to hustlers. The paper Is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue Is received from the subscriber. We must bo notified In wrUlng. by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer as we cannot find It on our list from the name alone on the paper. We must have both name and ad dress, and all arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expira tion IE :hcr/n on your paoer by address label containing your name. Falling to receive the paper regula...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1905

4 HORTICULTURE F. WALDEN Irrigation lias its advantages and its disadvantages. Under Ihe latter head may be classed alkali. Occasionally where irrigation is practiced we find some sections where the soil is ruined by alkali. What can be done in such cases? The writer does not presume to be an authority on alkali matters, but. having studied it to a considerable extent, hecan offer some suggestions that may be of value. It, is wellTTnown that where irrigation is practiced alkali will appear -where its presence had not been suspected. Why is this so? The answer to this is that the alkali was there in the soil all the time but the use of water in irrigation brought it to the surface. The gov ernment experts in their investiga tions of the contents of soils have shown that certain salts are more abundant in arid regions than in those sections of our country where rains are abundant. The copious rains tend to leach out the soils. The elements of fertility are washed away as well as some ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1905

ping ceased. The seasons vary so much lliat it is hnrd to lay down any rules ,is to time. Generally we should thin peaches during the latter part of May and the fore part of June. Apples should be thinned the latter part of June and on through July. Tn fact, ap ples may be thinned when nearly grown, with profit to those left on the irees. No fast and hard rules can be laid down as to time. The best thing to go by fca experience. Tn this matter we must feel our way into the greatea proficiency. * * * The how of thinning in many cases will depend on our experience, j If the tree is uniformly full all over the thin ning must be much more thorough than where there are many thin places and too thick only in spots. The tree, like a man or animal, is capable of carrying a certain load to a successful issue. It is better to have • this load evenly distributed, but where this can not .be done more than an average burden may be given to some parts that are very full. It frequently hap pens th...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1905

8 THE DAIRY The Importance of Dairying. The uniformed person fails to ap preciate the magnitude and importance of the dairy, interests of the country. This perhaps is due to the fact that the growth of the business of dairying has been of such a phenomenal char acter that public thought has failed to keep pace with it, and thus today we find that the average individual is un able to realize to what a vast extent the business has grown and what it means to the country as a whole. A little over a decade ago, grain raising was about the only source of revenue for our farmers. Tlie pros perity of an agricultural community depends almost entirely upon the pros perity of the soil tillers, and anything which aida in placing money in the pockets of the farmers indirectly pro motes prosperity in all lines of trade. We are all familiar with the history of those days when the farmer depend ed almost entirely upon his grain crops to nay off the mortgage on the homestead, clothe and sustain the ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1905

nge the nutritive ingredients are rath or less indigestible. It has been found by careful experi ment that the best time to cut most of the plants used for forage, whether to be fed green or to be cured and fel as hay, is when they are in full bloom. Experiments agree in showing that long keeping injures the digesti bility. The addition of considerable quantities of protein do not diminish the digestibility of the other nutrients, but on the other hand large quantities of starch, sugars, or fats may depress the digestibility of the protein. Among the cattle feeds grown upon the farm the legumes, such as clover, peas, etc., are more valuable than or dinary grasses because they contain large proportions of protein which serve to form blood, muscle, bone and milk. They respond readily to the application of mineral fertilizers and obtain a large part of their nitrogen needed for their growth from the air. Among the green fodders for soil ing crops and for their silage, Indian corn stand...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1905

8 HOUSEHOLD MRS. 8. O. WEBSTER Send communications for this department to Mrs. S. a. Webster. 269 Colman Block, Seattle, or direct to The Ranch. All ques tions will be carefully answered; contribu tions for publication are welcome. A New Field. This it; not. the farmer's field, but perhaps you will like to hear about it, anyway. This is a field for improved housework. T write so much about the household and am so interested in everything that is connected with it, that I naturally am very much in sympatehy with this new movement. It ia for the training of girls in the proper care of a home, and for prepar ing those who wish to take it up as a means of earning a living, to do the work in such a way as to command the besi wages. There are many girls who would like to find employment in town, but they do not feel themselves fitted io apply for positions. An excellent cooking school has been established in Seattle, the course for which is five dollars* Other branches of housekeeping are...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1905

ognizing the importance and utility of -iving them something distinctive, by which they may be picked out and known and talked about to the strang or. Still there are others that bear no name at all —and these are in the ma jority. Why would it not be a good idea to decide upon a suitable name — one that would be distinctive of your own ranch —and advertise it to the world, not necessarily by any expen sive advertising in the newspapers but by printed stationery and by the labels on tho fruits and other products that rome from your place? If you are an up to-date farmer you are as much of a business man as the merchant in the city, and you should have printed sta tionery and cards the same as does the merchant. And, again, whenever you have something to sell to the pub'lc at large you should place your adver tisement in such papers as The Ranch, using the name of the farm every time. By persistently calling the at tention of the people to your farm and giving them good products, you...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1905

10 POULTRY ——— H. li. BLANCHARD Communication* for thla department are nollctted. Femonal experiences detailed and question* prove of irreat benefit. Write to 11. L. Blanchard at Hadlock, Waah., or direct to The Ranch. Seattle. Low Death Rate With Chicks. J. H. Wolsieffer. So much has been said on the rais ing of chicks that the writer can give norliing new or startling. Bnt in our mind it is not so much the new or startling ideas, but to perfect the old that in our haste we have neglected to improve as we should. We believe in new methods when they obtain re sults. We know that the poultry world is moving along at a rapid gait, and to keep at the top we also under stand it is essential to be up to date. But in our haste we must not neglect the foundation. In one section of the country there are quite a few poultry plants, some new, some old, and most of them doing well. But we take especial interest in the beginner and the farmer poultry raiser, of which there are many, and in the ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1905

gg a day old. Many have taken this ip with success and I remember be ng told at the end of one of my lec ures that poultry keepers might with safety carry out what I had just told ihem as he the previous year started aid put all his eggs down when 16 a Milling and sold them in the winter is preserved eggs at 10 a shilling, and iad not enough to supply his custom ers." A Carson subscriber asks for the ,iame of some breeder of White Hol and turkeys. There are not very many of these breeders —at least, very ew make known their names and ad iresses. We suggest that our Carson riend correspond with J. A. Jefferson, Salem. Oregon, who undoubtedly has ,vhat is wanted. Do not keep a hen for laying after she is over two and a half years old. ;t is not profitable. Be sure your fowls have plenty of fresh water. If they are confined to ards see that they have green food. Chas. H. Lilly Co. Expanding. A few days ago the announcement was made that the Chas. H. Lilly Co., tor several years past Li...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1905

12 COMMISSION ROW TALK Now that th^ MUOn is approaching when the fruit growers will commence making shipments of their produce, th.To is considerable discussion among the oommhralbn men on Western ave nue. Seat tie. in regard to the manner in which the grower will pack his fruit for shipment.. Tt is known that there will be more new growers this year than ever before. Many hundreds of new acres of fruit-bearing trees will begin to produce for the market this year and shipments are looked for in great numbers from these people, who. being somewhat green at the business, will be likely to show more fault in their methods of packing than the older grower who has been at the busi ness for some time and has been edu cated into more careful methods. Tho newer growers are especially in need of instruction in regard to proper pack ing for most of these are novices at fruit growing and go about the work in what, though it can scarcely be termed careless, is certainly a hap hazard manner. The...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1905

THE, FIELD Campbell's Soil Culture. An inquiry came to The Ranch iv . enlly for a description of the method of soil treatment known as "Camp bell's Soil Culture." This would take too much space In The Ranch to go into detail, and as a brief article would probably not meet the requirements of the inquirer we suggest I hat he write to 11. W. Campbell,'924 South Twon tieth street, Lincoln, Neb., for a copy of "Campbell's Soil Culture Manual." lire price of which is fifty cents, and which should be remitted at time of sending for the book. The Manual: contains about a hundred pages, well illustrated, and goes into detail in a way Uiat will enable any one to under stand the principles embodied in Campbell's method. Rotation to Prevent Soil Blowing. We have again arrived at the time of year when the spring winds are , ngaging in the real estate business by licking up graftt quantities of surface 'oil,..blowing it to Kingdom come and sometimes back again. We are satis tied the trouble is d...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1905

v LIVE STOCK Favors the Red Polls. A. 11. Miller, Tacoma. I wish to say a few words to the breeders, feeders and farmers who always have some kind of cattle in their possession. The Pacific north west is in its infancy in the cattle business. It may have a leading posi tion as to numbers, and for ticky, cat hammed, spindle-shanked, mullet-head ed, sun-fish, usually called cattle, it may take the prize. Good stock, blood ed stock of individual merit, follow with the development of a country as certainly as the night follows the day. There is no more certain indication of a country's progress and thrift, slug gishness and indolence, or whatever its condition, than to judge it by its live ptock. Any ambitious farmer wants to get good stock, as we often hear them say, "just as soon as I can get around to it. Haven't got able to get around to it yet." And do you know that re minds me of the expression the Irish man made when he bought a new pair of boots that were a couple of sizes too s...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1905

cwner, has made good foundation Look. His herd on exhibition at the iiokane fair was only in breeding con it ion as they came from the field, but , ere no discredit to the owner. His , rices astonished me. He sells at . bout half the prices we used to get. If you think they are an experiment, .ou are mistaken; don't be afraid of iioni. The highest per cent any animal i vcr dressed was a cross bred Red Poll and Hereford (73.74 per cent.). Get ome of the breeders to send you milk testa and butter yields, and it will irprise you. They are natives of Nor folk and Suffolk counties in England. For many years there were two dis nnet breeds, or different types of the same breed, in these counties. Various theories have been put forward to ac ( .uint for these hornless cattle. The probability is that in the several va rieties of* Red Polled cattle found in England many years ago, we have the descendants of a very ancient breed. Anent the Meadowbrook Shorthorns. Under date of May 10th Mr. B. ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1905

16 YOU GAIN SEE . **rf¥ m^ -••-i»i'#^b^. For yourself the Merits of the TUBULAR SEPARATOR. They stick out all over it. / '■':ftPi^iMff^^'---' -S^^^W^ You don't need anyone to do your thinking- for you. That's the beauty of it. If '-■■■■-m&Kk* -'£'-<***'*'< i 0U Otl^ et your eyes on a Tubular yon will say "That is the machine for my '■'.^JWBHB^^^^&^HkS^} money." All other machines need an agent to explain away why they have a whole j y rE k '?'■ *°* °^ sus pio'us looking trimmings in their bowls, that tell you for themselves that ' - ■'^SS^^^g^^^B^^Bßi^H^^^., they are n^rd to clean, also to explain away why their supply can is stuck up so high '. "' l'V*""^'!^ "" / in tne a^r" Some machines even still have the dangerous exposed drive gear wheel. I."^^^^S^Hmßß^fe," '^faR All are bothersome to keep oiled. The TUBULAR runs lighter than any other, is easier ' «y^v'-l^SlHyßßWl^^tEv'^ -"** to wash, has no complicated parts in the bowl here it all is: •"l»"^flP m Saves half th...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1905

THE RANCH . VOL. XXII. NO. 11. PRESENT STATUS OF WASHINGTON IRRIGATION MATTERS Recent developments in the state of Washington touching the several irri gation projects in which the people have been so much interested and which they desire to see carried to a successful issue tend to discourage those who are most interested. The three matters that are receiving the bulk of attention are the Palouse pro ject, the Okanogan scheme and Irriga tion work in the Yakima valley. Re ports have been sent out that the Palouse project, which had been so ex haustively investigated by the govern ment engineers, would be abandoned, but these reports are denied by the officials in charge. Investigations car ried on during the past year brought to light the fact that the underlying ground is of such a nature that water would not remain in the reservoirs, and to maKe them capable of holding great volumes of water it would be neces sary to line the sides and bottom with cement, which would make the cost...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1905

s canal at this point, 40 feet in width and 34 feet in height, approximately 700 cubic yards masonry, at $9.00, mak ing $6,300. Total cost of construction, estimated: Work on power canal, $113,800; add cost of machinery and pipe line connection to irrigation ditch, $16,000—total, $129,800. This plant, when completed, will furnish.approximately 120 horse-power at extreme low water stage, taking stated fall from intake to discharge of tail race of 12 feet. (I do not be lieve they have a total fall of more than 8 feet.) This amount of avail able horse power will poimp 14 cubic feet per second to ditch level, 74 feet above power canal. Size of complete irrigation ditch, as sho.vn by slope and finish stakes set, is 6 feet wide oi«. bottom side slopes I-to-I, top of embankment 3 teet above ditch bottom. Assuming an extreme grade of \l/z feet per mile, this size ditch would have a carrying capacity of 40 cubic feet per second, or suffi cient water for 3,200 acres, providing power canal and...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1905

THE RANCH Office: 376 Column Building Ml I.l.Kit FItKKM AN Editor and Proprietor Associate Editors F. WALDKN, H. L. BLANCHARD MRS. S. O. WEBSTER. Issued the First and Fifteenth Kach Month Subscription, In advance, one year 50 cents; six months, SO cents. If on time, subscriptions will be $1. Seattle subscrib ers are required to pay $1.00 per year, on account of local postage. A«enis wanted In every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commissions and sal aries paid to hustlers. The paper Is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue Is received from the subscriber. We must be notified In wrUlng. by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer as we cannot find it on our list from the name alone on the paper We must have both name and ad dress, and all arrearages or dues must b« paid as required by law. Date of expira tion Is chcv.-n on your paoer by address label containing your name. Falling to receive the paper re...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1905

4 HORTICULTURE F. WALOEN BEFORE my lines are in print the Lew is and Clark Centennial and Oriental Fail will be opened. It is not the in tention of the editor of this department to write up the fair in a general way for The Ranch. That will properly belong to the daily and weekly press. But there will be many things to be learned touching horticulture, and these will engage our attention. The exhibit of fruit at this fair ought to be the finest ever shown on the American continent, and for that mat ter on the whole earth. From Cali fornia up into British Columbia is the greatest fruit country in the world. At Hood RN-er, Oregon, We natchee, Chelan and Yakima in Wash ington, and in the Okanagan country in British Columbia, the best apples are raised and find a ready sale in the markets of the world. California will come up with oranges, figs, dates, lemons, and so on to the end of the list. This is not to be a fruit fair ex clusively, by any means, but no other international fair can...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1905

egrate the yeast cake before adding it to the juice. The temperature should not go above 70° for any length of lime, to avoid loss of the alcohol by vaporation." * • * Before proceeding with this quota tion, I wish to mention a few things hat will make this subject clear to ,he beginner. The presence of acetic acid in vinegar is what gives it sour less. The sourness of apples in their natural state is not owing to acetic acid, or vinegar acid, but malic acid. \Jothine is said in the above quotation ibout acetic acid for the simple rea son that none is present. In making vinegar there are two kinds of ter mentation, alcoholic and acetic. The alcoholic comes first and is the one described above. When it is com nleted you simply have "hard cidfcr", containing from 5 to 7 per cent of alcohol. Some call tnis hard cider apple wine" and recommend its use. But this I could not do. The only time F was ever drunk in all my life was when I was five yearb old. I was paid five cents by two hired...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1905

6 THE DAIRY Nelson Warns the Condenseries. Bditor The Ranch: Milk in the White river valley is $20 per ton and potatoes $26 per ton. Price of milk is 15c per hundred less than be fore the condenseries wore established. Lots of the farmers are tiring of the dairy business, as anyone can see by taking a trip through the valley. There is more plowed land in tho White river valley than ever before, showing that the "dairymen are selling their cows and putting their ground into crops. The condenssries seem to think that the farmers will meekly submit to any amount of reduction in the price of milk. But they are getting their eyes opened. I would warn the condenseries to travel in the center of the road, and be a little more careful of their patrons' interests, because the dairy business in this section is threat ened with extinction because of their action in cutting prices so low. There are other ways for us to make a living than producing milk for the condens eries. The farmers can onl...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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