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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1993

December 1993/ January 1994 New AFBF coordinator plans to get more members involved RICHMOND—Joachim "Jim" Werner assured Virginia Farm Bureau board members during an October board meeting that he will work with them to get more members involved in calling their congressmen on agricultural issues. Werner is the new American Farm Bureau Federation area director of policy, programs and coordination for Virginia. Werner became the state's AFBF liaison Oct. 1 when Virginia and North Carolina were added to his five-state territory. He is also responsible for coordinating programs in Delaware, Maryland, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Virginia was previously represented by Leonard Slade. Werner, who lives in Mechanicsburg, Use wise wood buying to avoid getting burned RICHMOND—Wise wood buying is simple once you know how to avoid getting burned. Fall and winter are prime wood-buy-ing seasons for people who heat their homes with wood. And it's also the time that many con artists...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1993

4 Jan. 6-7,1994: Using Computers to Manage the Modern Farm 11, sponsored by Virginia Cooperative Extension. Germanna Community College, Locust Grove. Contact Gordon Grover at 703-231-5850 to register before Dec. 31. Jan. 6-7: Virginia Pork Industry Conference, Sheraton Inn, Charlottesville. Contact Alan Harper, 804-657-6450. Jan. 10-13:34 th Virginia Turf and Landscape Conference and Trade Show, Richmond Centre and Marriott Hotel. Contact Bruce Tharp, 804-340-3473. Jan. 11: Friends of the Industry of Agriculture monthly breakfast, Comfort Inn, Richmond. $7. Featuring Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Elmo Cross, D-Hanover. Contact Norm Hyde, 804-225-7528. Jan. 12-13: Using Computers to Manage the Modern Farm 11, sponsored by Virginia Cooperative Extension. Virginia State University, Petersburg. Contact Gordon Grover at 703-231-5850 to register before Dec. 31. Jan. 13: Virginia Agribusiness Council Annual Appreciation Banquet, Richmond. Contact Carleton Courter, 804-643-3555. Jan...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1993

December 1993/ January 1994 Follow heavy holiday meals with nutritious, flavorful soups As the winter winds begin to blow, there's nothing quite like a hot bowl of soup to warm you up. A big pot of homemade soup or stew can be the start to a week of quick, delicious meals—and it's a great way to use up leftovers. While there can be an initial time investment in dicing 1 l A lb. lean, boneless round steak 1 tsp. vegetable oil 1/2 tsp. dried whole thyme 2 large cloves garlic, minced 2 bay leaves 3 cups Burgundy or other dry, red wine 1/4 cup tomato paste 1/2 cup plus 3 tbsp. water, divided 2 'A cups quartered fresh mushrooms (about 1/2 lb.) Trim fat from steak. Cut steak into 1-inch cubes. Heat oil in a large Dutch oven over high heat until hot. Add steak; cook 5 minutes or until steak loses its pink color. Drain well. Wipe drippings from pan with a paper towel. Return steak to pan; place over medium heat. Add thyme, garlic and bay leaves; cook 1 minute. Add wine and tomato paste; bri...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1993

6 DODGE JUST CAME UP WITH 500 MORE REASONS FOR OEUMGMG TO YOUR BRH|UREtU. \ BB^:.-. ajß • ■ IM 8 1 FARM BUREAU NEWS December 1993/ January 1994

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1993

December 1993/ January 1994 Farm Bureau: The successful connection Virginia Farm Bureau Federation 68th Annual Convention ♦ Nov. 29- Dec. 2,1993 ♦ Roanoke Marriott and Sheraton Hotels ♦ Special Pullout Section Long-time Farm Bureau supporters win distinguished service awards By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor ROANOKE —Two people with long histories of supporting agriculture and the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation received the organization's Distinguished Service awards this year. Dr. A.L. "Ike" Eller Jr., Extension animal scientist and project leader in Virginia Tech's Department of Animal Science, was honored with the Distinguished Service to Agriculture Award. W A 'Doc" Robinson, a former Virginia Farm Bureau Federation board member, REBECCA COLNAR/FBN Doc Robinson receives the Distinguished Service Award to Farm Bureau from VFBF President C. Wayne Ashworth. Five Virginia Farm Bureau Federation directors re-elected to board By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor ROANOKE—Five V...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1993

8 1994 Farm Woman of the Year is no stranger to the tractor seat By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor ROANOKE—Hie 1993 Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Farm Woman of the Year says she is "no stranger to the tractor seat." Alma Lou Manning is as involved on her family's dairy farm as she is in agricultural organizations. "Alma Lou is a true working partner in the family's very successful dairy operation,'' wrote Floyd County Extension Agent David Gardner, who was one of the people who recommended Mrs.Manning for the award. "Alma Lou has played a big part in helping the dairy achieve a most enviable record, both in terms of quality of milk and in obtaining a production level of over 21,000 pounds of milk per cow." "She has always been a strong believer in the family farm, not only as the backbone of American agriculture, but as a way of life," commented Virginia Tech College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Extension Education Specialist William Murphy, who also recommended Mrs.Man...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1993

December 1993/ January 1994 New Miss Farm Bureau plans to promote agricultural literacy By REBECCA COLNAR VFBF County Communications Specialist ROANOKE—Laurie Leigh Fannon, daughter of Lany and Patty Fannon of Charlotte Courthouse, was crowned Miss Virginia Farm Bureau 1994 dining Family Night, Nov. 30, at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation 1993 Annual Convention in Roanoke. As the new Miss Farm Bureau, Miss Fannon plans to use her position to "help inform the public about agriculture and related aspects. "Even if I can help just one person become truly agriculturally literate, I will feel that my time has been well spent," Miss Fannon said. In her acceptance speech, Miss Fannon noted that fanners are continually under scrutiny by animal rights advocates and environmental groups. "This once-stable area is filled with misconceptions concerning its operational practices," Miss Fannon said. She noted that "many believe that farmers journey out into the field using little concern for s...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1993

10 Awards given to media that best covered Virginia agriculture By GREG HICKS VFBF Communications Director ROANOKE —For the first time in the competition's six-year history, the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation has presented both its Journalism Awards to media in the same city. The Richmond Times-Dispatch and WRIC-TV 8 received the awards during the VFBF's Annual Convention in Roanoke Dec. 1. The Times-Dispatch claimed the print category award for the second straight year, while Channel 8 took honors in the broadcast category. The Daily Press and Times Herald in Newport News received Honorable Mention in the print category. Youth leader looking forward to agriculture in the future ROANOKE —This year's Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Youth Leadership Award winner says today's youth are excited about tomorrow's opportunities in agriculture. "Tomorrow's advances will make our industry one of the most exciting," said Mark A. Cline, a senior at Fort Defiance High School in Augusta County....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1993

December 1993/ January 1994 Grapes are becoming a viable agricultural commodity By REBECCA COLNAR VFBF County Communications Specialist CHARLOITESVILLE—When people think of agricultural commodities in Virginia, tobacco, pork, peanuts and soybeans come to mind Grapes, however, are also a viable commodity in the Old Dominion, with 130 commercial vineyards in operation. Christopher Hill, owner of Glendower Vineyard and past president of the Virginia Vineyard Association, adamantly believes that grape growing is an excellent way to become involved in agriculture. Hill spoke to the Forum on Agriculture and Consumer Topics, or FACT, a group of agricultural journalists, during a wine industry tour of Burnley and Simeon wineries. "I'm a grape grower," Hill explained, "which means that I own a vineyard. However, I don't produce wines." Hill sells his grapes to wineries in the state. Although the wineries usually grow their own grapes, they often need to supplement their crop with others. "Th...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1993

12 Sometimes You Find The Answer a In The Strangest f Places! Who would ever think of looking in a / - 1 (_* Farm Bureau office for the answer to ( their health insurance needs? f / $1,700 )- ( Savings )r Mrs. V.S. of Russell County, Va. did — and she found the answer: "Isaved over $1,700 in annual premiums•■-. . So did more than 25,000 Virginians — and they found the answers to their health insurance problems. We know the average American is finding it tough to find adequate health insurance and to pay his medical bills. That's why the VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU has teamed up with BLUE CROSS and BLUE SHIELD OF VIRGINIA to offer several health insurance programs designed to fit your needs. SO CHECK US OUT IF YOUR PROBLEM IS OR IF YOU WANT • I don't have health insurance • Wide range of coverage in and • Insurance costs too much out of the hospital • Insurance I have doesn't give • Savings on your health insurance me good coverage • Prescription drug coverage • Doctor and hospital bills ar...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1993

December 1993/ January 1994 Farmers shouldbegin comptying with EPA regs before April 15 RICHMOND—The Environmental Protection Agency's new Worker Protection Standard takes effect April 15,1994, hut farmers need to begin implying now. "It's a very cumbersome law," said Jane Futch, assistant public affairs diredor tbe Pam Bureau Federation. "Farmers shouWt wait until April to get in compliance." The new law, which has been more than eight years in the making, is designed to protect agricultural woricers from possible exposure to pesticides. It applies to all farmers, foresters, and nurseiy and greenhouse workers. Basically, under the new standard, agricultural employers will be required to post signs informing workers where pesticides have been sprayed Employers will also be responsible for seeing that all of their employees have been trained m pesticide handling. In addition, wash sites will need to be >et up at different areas on the farm for \ , ' " t ■'''' ■■■■■■■■■■■■■...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1993

14 THE FARMERS MARKET A Free Service to Members Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $4.50 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge (15 words). member must pay TOTAL number of words Single letters or figures and groups of figures in ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. CLASSIFIED ADS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I Deadline: Ads must be received by the 15th of each month prior to the month of publication. For the combined Sept./ Oct. issue, the deadline is Aug. 15. For the Dec./ Jan. issue, the deadline is Nov. 15. Ada must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1993

December 1993/ January 1994 Dodge offers $500 rebate on award-winning 1994 truck The Dodge Division of Chrysler Corporation is offering a new bonus certificate program for Farm Bureau members who purchase trucks in 1994. The new program includes several models of the new 1994 Ram Pickup, which won Motor Trends 4x4 of the Year and Truck of the Year awards. Farm Bureau members can get $500 cash back or choose four DeWalt power tools when they buy eligible trucks in the program. This special incentive for Farm Bureau members is the only consumer incentive now offered on Dodge pickups. Eligible models under the new program include: • 1994 or 1995 Ram Pickups with the 5.9 L cummins turbo diesel or 5.9 L magnum V 8 gas engines only—Ram 1500 (1/2 ton) 4x2 or 4x4, Ram 2500 (3/4 ton) 4x2 or 4x4, Ram 3500 (1 ton) 4x2 or 4x4, and Ram 2500 and 3500 chassis cabs 4x2 or 4x4. Calendars on sale to commemorate AFBF's 75th anniversary PARK RIDGE, UL—ln honor of the new year and the American Farm Bure...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1993

Farm Bureau • r ,fcallrM w - : 1 ' HELPING YOU IS WHAT WE DO BEST! December 1993/ January 1994 The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation 1993 Annual Convention included commodities and doggers, among other things. In left photo, Pat Padgett, who represents the Southeastern District on the VFBF Women's Committee, reaches for a Virginia apple during a commodity break. Below, clogging students from the Christiansburg area dance to the sounds of the Wilderness Trail Cloggers as they entertain Farm Bureau members at the convention banquet. (For more on the VFBF annual convention, see Pages 7-10.) Uncommon convention THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS K, * H Mi R| * JKKtM |L Vol 52, No. 10 ,v'*£'v?.v':-7 1H ■ 1 X n ' - .." r '" T '^gHndc|JMKL KATHY DIXON/FBN Convention 7-1 0 wrap-up Find out how to make flavorful, healthful soups after filling up on heavy holiday meals. Soup's on 5 Wise wood 3 buying KATHY DIXON/FBN Top tobacco growers talk about their strategies for success. Top pr...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1994

Farm Bureau Vol 53, No. 1 Still time for farmers to complete conservation plans RICHMOND—Now that the New Year has arrived, it's time for farmers to complete work on practices required in their conservatkm compliance plans. Far anyone who thinks if s too late, the 115. Soil Conservation Service says ifs not, "Right now is the best time for you to review your conservation plan to see where you stand as far as meeting requirements for the Dec. 31 deadline of the 1985 and 1990 Farm Bills," said George C. Norris, SCS state conservationist "Many of you have already completed your compliance plans, but for others who are looking to wrap it up, there are a lot of questions: What practices remain to be installed this year? Are there any practices left to be applied from previous years? "Are there any changes in operations, such as new land being brought into production , that may require additional practices? Iswhat Rn dring acceptable?" For some farmers, previously planned practices may no...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1994

2 Virginia's land-use taxation program is becoming endangered In recent years Virginia's land-use taxation program has been under fire, primarily because of the Old Dominion's rapid growth since the late 19705. Urban sprawl has taken farms out of production and replaced them with shopping malls, six-lane highways, residential developments and schools. Municipal planners smile at the tax revenues they gain from these developments. But do they look at the whole picture? Apparently not. The state's land-use taxation was enacted with the help of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation in 1971. The program's bottom line was and still is to keep farmland near urban areas in production and away from the hands of development It works like this: Localities have the option to tax farmland based on the return Snail serves as important benchmark Nearly everyone has heard of the Spotted Owl, but very few people even know there is such a thing as the Bruneau Hotspring Snail. Nonetheless, the unherald...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1994

February 1994 Feb. 2: Virginia Forage and Grasslands Council Northern Forage Conference, Barboursville Fire Hall. Contact Harlan White, 703-231-9802. Feb. 2: Southside Virginia Small Grains and Oilseed program, Southern Piedmont Research and Extension Center, Blackstone. Contact Mike Hemy, 804-561-2481. Feb. 3: Virginia Forage and Grasslands Council Valley-Blue Ridge Forage Conference, Edinburg Fire Hall. Contact Harlan White, 703-231-9802. Feb. 3-4: Using Computers to Manage the Modern Farm seminar, Massanutten Vo-Tech Center, Harrisonburg. Contact Gordon Groover, Virginia Tech, 703-231-5850. Feb. 3-4: Timber income tax workshop, Blacksburg. Contact Harry Haney, 703-231-5212. Feb. 4-6: Virginia Young Farmers convention & Virginia FFA Alumni convention, Sheraton Inn, Charlottesville. Contact William Dannenhaurer, 804-225-4543. Feb. 4-6: 4-H All-Star Midwinter Conference, Winchester. Contact Wayne Compton, 703-231-6371. Feb. 4-6: Virginia Lumber Manufacturers' Association...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1994

4 IjWMjflJ J — •'~' r* —" ■'—~^T — '**•' *■"•• •■* fl f ' ::rr ' ~ Dodge Ram 5.9 L Magnum V-8 GET $500 CASH BACK Ram Wagons. And your cash back is on np Cinnn \A/fIRTH fIF to P of ar| y other national offer.* Or if you un <p IUUU wlf un I n ur prefer, select up to $1,000 in quality DeWalt DEWALT TOOLS. tools. All you need is a certificate from your state's Farm Bureau before you see your It's looking like another good year for Dodge dealer. Cash back or DeWalt tools - American farmers. First we introduce the expect a record harvest. new Ram Pickup, "The Truck Of The Year" .. hh „ „ rJ , k r This cash back offer is valid for members of participating Farm Bureaus, expires 12/31-94. and according to Motor Trend. And now the may not be used in combination with any other Chrysler Corporation certificate program or . . .. a • ' it .1 i i ' certain other special programs. Ask for restrictions and details truck that changes all the rules also comes with a special $500 cash incent...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1994

February 1994 New nutrition label gives consumers inside information By May 8, almost every product in your grocery store will be sporting a new image. This fashionable look in food outerwear is called Nutrition Facts. The bold heading, clean lines and simple format are sure to be a hit this season, once you know how to use the information. Over the next three issues of the Farm Bureau News well look at the new Nutrition Facts labels in detail. The first thing youll probably notice is the easy-to-read heading called Nutrition Facts. The bold lettering used throughout the information panel is required to be a certain size and type style—no more need for a magnifying glass to find the numbers you need. Serving Size, listed directly under the Nutrition Facts title, will be based on amounts of food people actually eat as determined by consumer surveys. It will be easier to compare foods now since similar products will have similar serving sizes. Household and metric measures will be lis...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1994

6 Some soybean growers believe checkoff is vital By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor DINWIDDIE —For at least one Virginia soybean grower, the Soybean Promotion and Research Checkoff is well worth the money. "I support the checkoff all the way," said Alvin Blaha, who grows 425 acres of soybeans in Dinwiddie County. "I think the national checkoff program is a very vital part of the soybean industry." But some farmers are not so sure. After two years of operation, the national soybean checkoff is up for renewal. On Feb. 9, soybean growers across the country will vote on whether to continue the checkoff, directed by 63 farmer-members of the United Soybean Board. During a national referendum, "growers will be able to cast their votes at county Extension offices, or cast absentee ballots by mail," said Harold Phillips, USB chairman and a soybean grower from Stevenson, Ala. "The way it looks now, seven of 10 soybean growers approve of how the USB goes about its business of planning and ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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