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Title: Independent, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 7,842 items from Independent, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Mistress and Maid. HOUSEHOLD SHOPPING ON THE CONTINENT. [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

Mistress and Maid. ? HOUSEHOLD SHOPPING OK THE CONTINENT. . ^ , Paris is quite as modern a city, as London; Uerlin, Vienna, and Milan have very much the same standard in these days of Insurious living. Yet., in any of these cities (according to the "Daily Telegraph") it is quite common to see a mis tress followed by her domestic, who bears a large basket, into which ar ticles are placed as soon as they are purchased. Household shopping is still looked upon as an art to bo cultivated rather than despised. Ladies of good position walk out oi a morning for the early market, 59 that they may see for themselves what is to be had and buy to the best advantage. Indeed, of a morning in Paris, the master of the house himself does not think it at all deroga tory to pass by the Halles Cen trales and to do his shopping. Behind him comes the servant maid, smart in her cotton frock, perfectly clean, her neat frilled cap, and her big, blue apron. Sho docs not by any means look upon her shopping ex...

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

Good News for Women. VISIT OF SKILFUL LADIES' SPECIALIST. NURSE GREER Ail experienced Sneci-tlist from the Head Quarters Staff of HIE LAPIBS' COLLEGE OF HEALTH, 327 Collins street, Melbourne, uny be consulted at the Benalla Ho'e', BENaLLA, frnm 6 p.m. on THURSDAY, September 17th, till 10 a m. on SATURDAY, September 19tli. This vis.t is being mad.i for tlie convenience of those who cannot afford the time and expense of a visit to Mel bourne, Every ivomau in ill-health should embrace this opportunity of obtaining the skilful advise of one of her own sex, who, speaking from wide experience, will explain liow good health may be restored without many of the operations now performed on suffering women, and also how speedy relief may be obtained, after nil other means have failed, from Headaches, Bickache, Pains in the Sides and I'it of Stomach, Nausea, Rheumatism, Catarrh, Pilts, Biliousness. Indigestion, Liver and Kidney Troubles, Aslhnia, Eczema, &c. FlhasE Notk.—The Ladies' Col...

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
Aeroplane Messages. [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

Aeroplane Messages. As the flying machine developed, the need of subsidiary apparatus became apparent. Military men soon demanded the installation o( wireless apparatus, guns, armour and similar accessories. While a great deal of experimenting .has been done to give them what they want, it can hardly be said that a very great measure of success has as yet been uttnined. Especially is this true of the wireless equipment. The sending apparatus which can bo i carried on an aeroplane is neces | sarily of very small range, and the recehing apparatus must struggle j with the difficulty of interference. Some day these objections will un doubtedly be overcome, but until they are, a French inventor and aviator, Paul Vugniron, believes that some such apparatus as he has invented and tested near Brest will be more acceptable to military men. With his invention a message can bo dropped in' full flight by an aviator who is sullicicntly near his destination, the craft returning im mediately at fu...

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

Business Notices. HERBAL COUGH BALSAM Has a bite with it which cuts away your :ough as you swallow it. Pleasant to take, children do not refuse it. It has stood a test of 20 years. It is steadily adding to its reputation. We receive orders from customers nil over the country. It is always fresh and reliable. It will do you good. ^ VICTOR SAY, CHEMIST. BENALLA. P U BLIC NOTICE • J AS. KENNY, Begs to notify the public that he hps Purchased the CARRYING BUSINESS OK MR. A. A. WITHERS. . . Prompt and Careful Attention given to all Orders Deliveries in Town or Country. - O S O S O F" 7 Fop the Hands, IS a pure, genuine, Toilet preparation which removes all roughness and makes the hands perfectly smooth, soft and white. OSOSOFT is quickly applied, if soothing and nourishing, and is lasting in itB effect. There are no chapped hands wher« OSOSOFT is used. It is invaluable foi keeping the hands pliant and flexible Mubicians praise it highly. Price, 8/, poBted, 3/6. MRS. DUDLEY, Ososoft Depot,...

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
Monument to Scott. [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

Monument to Scott. On the summit of the famous pass in the French Alps, the Col du Lau taret, near Grenoble, at a height ol over 6,000ft., there now stands among the snows a memorial to Captain Scott. It was erected by the French explorer. Dr. Charcot. In the winter of 1908, when pre paring for his expedition to the South I'ole, Captain Scott had spent several weeks at/ Le Lautartet in the ' company of Br. Charcot, testing hfs motor sledges, and it is in memory of this stay that the me morial has been reared. It consists of a sort of cairn some 10ft.. high, surmounted by a flagstaff. The four paces of the base point to the fourquarters of the heavpns. On the last pace is a bronze tablet bearing this inscrip tion : "The Englishman, Captain Scott, who, on returning from the South Pole, died bravely with his companions in the cause of his country and of science in March, 1912, stayed at I.e Lautaret in 1903, in order to prepare for this memorable expedition." * The cairn stands in an A...

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
Phases of the Moon. August. [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

Phases of the Moon. rt J August. Fust quarter, I-rHtay ^otu Septkmuhr. Full moon, Saturday bih Last quarter. Sunday 13th New moon, Suuday 20tli First quarter, Saturday 26tli [October. Full moon, Surday 4lh Last quarter. Mondav 12th New moon, Monday 19tb FirfcFquarter, JVlowiny 26tli Novkmbbs. Full monii, TueMlay 3rd Last quariei, Wednesday 11 til New moon, Wednesday 18tli First quarter, Tuesday 24tli

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
The Benalla Show Success Under Adverse Conditions. Estimated Profit £150. [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

The Benalla Show Success Under Adverse Conditions. Estimated Profit £150. The weather was a scorcher on Tuesday and Wednesday. This sniff from the Never Never Coun try, No Maii^s Land, or Sbeo!— just left to the individual taste of the reader as to the most pictur esque temi — blis-ered everything in Nature's garden. Neighboring kindred societies felt the ill-effects of the prolonged spell of withering atmospheres, and it would be some thing uncommon for Benalla to be "out of the fashion" even when droughts are on. The 1913 Show was crowned with a garland of Spring: 1914 sweltered under a shimmering Summer haze. It was not to be expected under the ad verse conditions prevailing that the gate receipts would increase abnor normally. On the other band they did not shrink to the croaking level of the pessimist. The Society, if anything, came through one of the most trying seasons more than holding its own. The incoming | trains brought iu large crowds, and one of the most appreciated an...

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

I " By their Chicks shall ya j know thorn." j Si-minus Now Ready :—Famous Re Sussex (imp.), 7/6 tier se ting of IS ' egRS ; Silver Wyandotte (imp. rock; erel), 6/; also Silvers nt 5/; While Leghorns (Pacinian - Iiinnear), 5/; Black Orpington, 5/; -Minorca, 5/. Guaranteed all chicks true to name. Orde s supplied in rotation. Terms: Cash with order. Order now, and save disappointment. The Red Sussex is tUe greatest utility breed on earth. Dressed Poultry on shortest notice. Address communications to The Manager, Be inlla Poultry Farm (next Leak's F.1C tory). B.-ualla West.— Auvr.

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
THE WORD OF TRUTH. [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

<i"til 12 WORD OF TRUTH. uv lwsnoit Hissiir.L: Text: "Learn of -Mo; for I ainiiieek ami lowly uf heart" (M.ilt xi. -XJ). ' Tin- Pastor liesnn Ins Uwuiuiav tvilli l"'-' statement lliat there is only one way by wlijch to -J<a nil ol our suits—in the L.ud .l(i-ii- Christ. Hut mere intellectual belief, Ito clrclni'd, (Iocs not act-»n«j>!>.-li tins result Tin- believer who ually im-anrr what Jie says will malic a.lull consecration of himself lo God. I'roin a slainlpomt of I lie Scriptures a bclicvci is-a dioctple, 3 follower, a imjJil. Tlie School ol Christ is r.<ot opi;n to everybody, the speaker explained. U.'!icrc is one definite way ol entering ^ ,,"K and becoming a pupil of the great Mastci Teacher. Hear the tern's m Ills own words:—1"If any man will come alter. Me. (become My disciple-pupil), let linn deny himself, lake up his cioss and follow Mi'-' Only tliuse. who present their bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto Ootl through th...

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
Social Changes. [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

Social Changes. * The fashion which has obtained of late years of not introducing guests to each other causes muny to feel awkward and unhappy, and savours more of bad manners than w'ant of tact. It has for some time called forth the criticism of visitors from other lands accustomed to more graceful procudurc. • Gone are many of the arts in which women of bygone times delighted. 1.otter-writing as practised to-day Is of a kind to mako Mme. Sevigne turn in her grave. The art of con versation, with its rapid thrust of wit and its sparkle of repartee, has withered in the hands of the pre sent-day girl with her rare choice of slang. Good manners, that courtcsy and good breeding that knows how to put every one at their ease, is at a discount, and brusquerie that would have set on edge the teeth of many a dead and gone hostess of rare charm, is the fashion, says the "Pall Gazette." Then the ideal entertainment has gone. Its place has been taken by mammoth gatherings without soul, and the ...

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
The Use of Condiments. [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

The Use of Condiments. It would appear that condiments aro choscn to accompany those | foods which are less digestible or which are richer than others. Mut-| ton, for example, is more digest ible than beef, pork, or duck, and it is to these three that mustard is generally added. Vinegar again is known to soften the hard fibre of both meat and vegetables; hence it probably renders such foods as crab, lobster, salmon, salads, red cabbage, and walnuts less tough and more digestible. Vinegar in dress ing and sauces probably has a | similar action. As a rule," says the "Lancet," "the increased amount of soluble or extractive matters in a food is in direct relation to its digestibility and nourishing value, not that the extractive principles are in themselves nourishing, but because they are appetising and promote the flow of digestive juices. Dread and cheese and beer form a most enjoyable meal after brisk exercise in the open country air, but during sedentary occupation very little reli...

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
Newsboys on Horseback. [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

Newsboys on Horseback. ■" J, Most newsboys think themselves well oft if they own a good suit oi clothes ; but in the Uruguayan capital of Monte Video there are over fifty newsboys who own horses, and peddle their papers on horse back. Montevideo has three hundred thousand inhabitants, but it spreads over a considerable territory. I.ike other people, the Uruguayans wnnt their evening paper as noon as possible after it comes from the press. The horseback newsboys sup ply this demand with astonishing rapidity. . "l>a Rar.on." one of the leading evening journals, is issued at fivo o'clock. About twenty minutes before that hour the news boys, mostly young men from eigh teen to twenty-five years of age, gather in the street in front of the newspaper office. When the papers are brought out, a clerk hands a bundle to each, and away he starts at full gallop. All the business in the centre of the town is done by ordinary "foot newsboys." The horsemen race away to their beats in the suburbs...

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
ANOTHER WAY OF DRESSING ONIONS. [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

ANOTHER WAY OF DRESSING ONIONS. Boil the onions in stilted water un til tender ; drain them thoroughly and cut them into hnlves or quar ters, according to their size. Put a layer of bread crumbs and bits of butter. Put in another layer of onions and crumbs alternately till the dish is full, having crumbs for the top layer. Pour over the whole half a cup of cream or new milk, and grato above it a covering of cheese. Hake for about half an hour. This is a much apprecia ted vegetarian dish.

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
Ladies' Column. STUFFED ONIONS. [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

Ladies' Column. STUFFED ONIONS. Spanish or large sized Bermuda onions are best for this dish. Peel the onions, and from the stalk end take out the. centre oi the onions. Put them in a pan of boil ing salted water, niul cook for ten minutes. Then lay the onions, opening down, on n clean cloth to absorb the water. Make a stuffing of chopped chicken and ham in the .proportion of two of chicken to one of ham, or to one tablespoonful of bread crumbs. Chop the onion hearts removed before boiling, add them to the other ingredients with a tablespoon ful of oiled butter, pepper and salt to taste. Moiston with a littlo white stock. Fill the onions with this mixture, and place them in a baking tin, containing water to the depth of one inch. Sprinkle the onions with bread crumbs, cover with tin, and bake in a hot oven for one hour, or until the onions are tender, but retaining , their shape. Removo the cover long enough to brown the onions lightly before they are taken from the oven.

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
Doctor and Tiger. [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

Doctor and Tiger. When it became known thnt tlio best shot in the company was go ing into the jungle to compass the death of a terrible tiger, the sur geon-major of the regiment, an en thusiastic curio-collector, at once buttonholed him. "Remember, Atkins," said he, "I bespeak the skin at your own price." "All right, sir," said Atkins. The surgeon-major was netting butterflies on the outskirts of the jungle that evening when he 9aw Atkins running towards him. "Shot him ?" shouted tlie surgeon major. "Yes, sir I" breathlessly replied the flying Nimrod. ! "How much for the skin ?" I "Five quid, sir !" The doctor gave Atkins the money. "Where's the skin ?" he cried. "Behind you, sir !" came the re ceding answer. ■ The doctor looked, and saw tin si. in, with the tiger in it, coming open-mouthed and bleeding from a scratch where .At'<ins had "shot " it. The doctor didn't get tha tiger's skin, but the tiger nearly got the doctor's, ,

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
KITCHEN WRINKLES. [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

KITCHEN WRINKLES. ♦ If anything on which paraffin has been spilled—hands included—i« rub bed with raw potato, the smell.will immediately disappear. New potatoes should be placed in boiling water to which salt aud a little milk have been added. The milk prevents 'them from turning black. The popular cabbage is useful for drawing and cleansing a gathered finger or poisoned hand. Take a cabbage leaf, roll it 'out with a : bottle until the juico comes, and tie it on the affected part. Salt will remove black beetles. Put plenty of salt where the beetles frequent, and keep it there for a week. Do not leave any water where the insects go. When they eat the salt it will dry up their bodies. To remove the smell of fish or cabbage from a saucepan, burn a piece of brown paper on the fire and turn the saucepaYj down over the burning paper. This will re move all odour, whatever it is, in a few seconds. A reinforccd-concrete building, 200 feet high, containing a spiral drive way for automobiles t...

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
RENOVATION HINTS. [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

RENOVATION HINTS. A good way of cleaning men's suits, serge, and other woollen dresses, is the following :—Put a tea spoonful of borax in a quart of cold water. Boil' It for half an hour, then pour it into a bowl, and when lukewarm dip a sponge in tho fluid, and rub tho stains. After wards brush over with a brush dipped in clear cold water, and press the garment with a hot iron, placing a cloth over the ma terial .before pressing it. To renovate blue serge mix 'to gether two ounccs of spirits of •wine and one ounce of liquid am monia. Soak a piece of cloth in tho "mixture, rub the material with it, and press, with an iron, placing n ploth between the hot Iron and ninrctinl. To remove tho undesir ablo shine from coats and dresses, dissolve an ounco of rock-ammonia, and half an ounce of white Cas tillo soap in a pint of boiling water. When quite dissolved dip a sponge in the fluid, and rub the fcliiny place. Afterwards rub with a dry cloth.

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
A USEFUL CLEANING FLUID. [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

A USEFUL CLEANING FLUID. A cleaning fluid for silk and woollen fabrics that has given much satisfaction can be made as fol lows : Put into a largo pan two quarts of water, half an ounce of boras, and four ounces of white Castillo soap, shaved fine. Set the pan on tho fire and stir it fre quently until the borax is dissol ved. Take tho pan off tho. fire, add two quarts of cold water, and when the fluid is quite cold put into it an ounce of glycerine, and one of ether. Store In bottles for use. It will keep for years. To clcan any article first brush it thoroughly then spread it on a table, sponge it with the cleaning fluid, and rub hard till tho stains disappear. Spots may bo removed from carpets in the same ■tt'ay.

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
DUTCH FRITTERS. [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

DUTCH FRITTERS. I Ingredients Six ounces of flour ; four ounces of butter; three eggs, half a pint of milk or \rtiter, and about half a pint of lard. Method : Boil the milk, or water as may be, add the butter, stir the flour in very gradually, and cook gently over the fire until it ceases to adhere to the spoon, or stewpan. Turn I the mixture on to a dish, and ] when cool stir in the yolks of the eggs ; beat stiffly, and add lightly the whites of the eggs. Heat the lard and put in the dough, a tea spoonful at a time, then fry gen tly until the fritters are nicely browned, turning thein frequently. When done, dredge liberally with fine sugar, and serve hot. Time to fry, fifteen minutes. Sufficient for eight or nine persons.

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
Hanged for Signing Four Names. [Newspaper Article] — The Independent — 9 October 1914

Hanged for Signing Four Names. People have not Always been allow ed the pleasure of having as many names as they wish. Four hun dred years ago not even a middle name was allowed in England. It was illegal. The old English law was definite and admitted of no infraction of its ruling. , The only exception made to this ' regulation was in the case of per ■ sons of Royal rank. If they wish i ed, they could boast a middle ! name, but woo to the person of [■ordinary rank who was sufficiently | unwise or obstinate to insist on j having more than two appellations. | For the first ofience he would likely • bo tied to a whipping-post and , severely lashed. For a second of fence he would endure some more lasting punishment, perhaps the rc | moi-ul of his thumbs or his ears. ! and if he persisted in his stubborn ness he would 1)0 hanged. i There is a case on record of a man who insisted on signing four ; names every time he wrote his sig j nature. He raised through nil the legal stages of punis...

Publication Title: Independent, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Benalla, Australia (Vic)
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