ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 382,303 items from Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
382,303 results
LOUISE MACK'S DIARY [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

LOUISE MACK'S DIARY THE LORD MAYOR'S DAUGHTER That sounds like a novel. And perhaps it may be. Anyway, never was a prettier bride than Miss Hagon going forth from Sydney to be mistress over a lovelier home than "Nindoowimbah," the Collins homestead. I stayed there once with Mrs. Willie Collins, John's mother, and in my private diary I put down this record. THERE before us, hanging on the far edge of the hill we were just motor- ing round, lay a great red bungalow in a garden rich with a million flowers all dancing in the breeze, and breathing out their heavy perfume to the sunny noon- tide. A SYDNEY GIRL'S FUTURE HOME There were thousands of strong blue larkspurs as tall as a man, and masses of giant carnations, crimson, scarlet, purple, pink, and white. Roses crawled over everything, great yellow and crim- son roses, and wistaria in the glory of its purple tinting and its inimitable frag- rance, flung itself like a green and violet tapestry over the front verandah of the great squa...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Our SEARCH for BEAUTY MEN are the GUILTY ONES [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

Our SEARCH for BEAUTY MEN are the GUILTY ONES By CANDID JANE As we have been overburdened with articles such as "Women, How to Keep Your Husbands," and "A Husband's Love Strayed," etc., which tell us of all the things a wife MUST and MUST NOT do to remain the one and only in her husband's life, is it not about time someone told the men how to keep the affection of their wives? When you come to think of it all men are not oil paintings! MEN who are nearing middle age take heed, if you have an at- tractive young wife and wish to keep her! Look out for that ever-spreading waist-line and double chin which usually accompanies it. Of course, if you are one of those unfor- tunates who possess a bald pate, you must make the best of nature's gift (?) and be as good looking as you can in other respects. Half the women who fuss about, pressing and clean- ing their husband's clothes do it not so much out of loving duty as with the idea of making the best of a bad job. Even a plain hus- band whe...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
BRAINWAVES! [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

Conducted by L. W. Lower.   GUEST: "I am so thirsty." Hostess: "I'll get you some water." Guest: "I didn't say I was dirty— I said I was thirsty." Prize of 10/'- to C. Hyssett, Chislehurst,   Dural, N.S.W. THE people of Australia could appre- ciate a lot by remembering that they were in the Pacific, where great forces were operating, said Captain H. J. Feakes, former captain-superintendent of Naval establishments at Sydney. Any- body who was in the Pacific in this weather and didn't know it must be dead to all feeling. RUM toffee has no rum in it. It must be rum toffee.   "IN our set, we never ask foolish per- sonal questions."—Society News. A whyless set, evidently. IT'S just as well that Eve ate that apple. Sooner or later Adam would have been bound to be chucked out for eating onions. "DO you know what happens to little boys who swear?'' said Father O'Hooligan, to the small boy. "They go into a great black pit, and the devil is chained up at...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
THE BODY BEAUTIFUL CARE of the HAIR [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

          CARE of the HAIR HAIR hygiene and its possibilities was the topic discussed at a recent "event." I noted the following from one whose hair was the object of appreciative comment and admiration:— "I am a firm believer in frequent shampooing and brushing. Often I permit myself the luxury of having my hair shampooed twice a week, and with the same soap, made of pure oils, that I use for my face and my bath. Many people make a practice of drying their hair before the fire or electric radiator, whereas I find it a better policy to employ a soft towel in conjunction with fresh air and sunlight. Nature intended the latter for just such a purpose." Brushing, Massage, & Tints For Your Crowning Glory By PAM NOW it is a wonder to me that many of my sex have any hair at all to worry about. They either wave it, or curl it; and bleach it or tint it; and meanwhile omit the ordinary care that is essential. I insist t...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
FOR MOTHERS AND YOUNG WIVES [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

FOR MOTHERS AND YOUNG WIVES BY A DOCTOR BABY'S   MOUTH   ALTHOUGH       Baby Clinics   have done a very   great deal in mak-     ing the world   safer for babies,       there are still     some evils which   do not seem to be     realised by many     mothers, e s p e -   cially older ones. One thing which is still frequently done is to swab out the baby's mouth as a part of its toilet. This practice is to be condemned. Sometimes the swabbing is sufficiently energetic to rub away the very thin lining of the mouth and so leave it open for infection. This habit, too, is a cause of thrush. After all, nature has provided a baby with a very efficient mouth and a sali- vation system which cleans it sufficiently. Another p...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
BEAUTY HELPS for the Smart Woman [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

BEAUTY HELPS for the Smart Woman (BY RITA MOYA) SURE WAY OF REMOVING SUPERFLUOUS HAIRS. The usual hair removers on the market I have found not at all satis- factory. I recommend the following preparation. It is really wonderful in its action, destroying hairs completely in a few moments. Many women have merely a down on the arms and face, and imagine they do not need a hair remover. They hardly realise what a wonderful difference there would be in their appearance if this down, even light as it may be, were removed. Get at any good chemist a package of pure powdered pheminol. Mix a little of it into a paste with water, and apply it to the hair growths. Wash off after two minutes, and the hairs will have entirely disappeared. It is ideal for removing hair from the underarms, and is a necessity to the up-to-date woman. NATURAL WAVY HAIR. Your hair will regain its rich lustre and fluffy appearance if cleansed occasionally with a mild shampoo. The very best thing I know of for this purp...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

WHY NOT . . . . have FACIAL REJUVENATION No one bothers about your age—so long as you look young—but how often does one hear the remark, "She must be getting on," when tell-tale lines from nose to mouth wrinkles around the eyes—sagging cheeks and neck—denote that age is definitely creeping on? . . . Madame Louise Day, our beauty expert, has just returned from abroad, studying the latest treatment methods in face rejuvenation—she was trained in U.S.A. by Elizabeth Arden and Max Factor. . . It will be a revela- tion to you to hear her explain her treatment, and prove definitely what she can do to restore your face to its former youthful appear- ance, and which, incidentally, will also give you a new lease of hap- piness. Treatment only 5/6 ea. or Course of 6 sittings, 30/- Naturally Wavy Hair The hair—woman's crowning glory—will soften the plainest features with permanent waving—done properly-and make the beautiful more beautiful. . . . Buckinghams Ltd. have built a reputation for ski...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Things that Happen MAGPIE'S COLLECTION [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

MAGPIE'S COLLECTION FOR many years a pair of magpies nested in a tall gum tree near our house. Not long ago a storm brought to the ground the branch containing the nest. Apparently additions had   been made each year, for it was a huge affair. In the lining were silver forks and spoons, strings of beads, two gold brooches, a silver cufflink, four metal collar studs, a Nellie Stewart bangle, and a gold wrist watch. Mother identi- fied the cutlery, other members of the family claimed mysteriously lost pro- perty; but not one of us could place the wrist watch. Some of the articles must have been in the nest for years.—10/- to   E.E., Well Station, Canberra. * * * YES, WE HAVE NO . . . . ZOOMING into Circular Quay by a Cre- morne ferry last week, passengers were amused to see a well wrapped-up, middle-aged man, casting a rod line from the side of the "Kanimbla." Sud- denly he whipped in the fishing line, and brought into view a green banana which had apparently...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

f.-u-m-n-u-«-M-«-m-»-m-m-^ I Strange incidents of life that 1 f come under your notice, or in | 1 which you may be personally in- | J volved, may be of interest to ! . others. i The Australian Women's | J Weekly will pay 10/ for the best i I contribution to this column, and j ! consolation prizes will be j I awarded for other published ' ? items.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
The FASHION PARADE LINEN first favorite for SUMMER Cotton Suits For All Occasions [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

The FASHION PARADE     by Jessie Tait. LINEN first favorite for SUMMER Cotton Suits For All Occasions Cottons, linens and flax rival all fabrics this season. Suits of these materials stand out in all the collections—cotton goods masquerading as tweed, homespun, twill and such stuffs; linens disguised as shantung, taffeta and serge. Light colors are favored, of course. A GREAT advantage in having suits of these materials is that they are firm, and do not stretch. Most of them are also uncrushable, and will wash like rags. For evening there are transparent cot- tons and linens, cotton voiles as soft and filmy as chiffons, organdie and organza, of which you will hear more later. The linings of jackets and the blouses of these suits are being made of the new plaid cotton taffeta, with dark ground. It is possible that the black shirts of the Fascisti inspired the fashion de- signers in Paris to reverse the order of things and put dark tops over lighter skirts. T...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Spotlight [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

Spotlight   CLARK GABLE is an excellent marks- man, and has repeatedly outshot guides and other woodsmen during his various hunting trips. Another good shot is John Miljan, the well-known villain. It is an interesting fact that both Gable and Miljan won fame for playing gang- sters. We're not insinuating anything, but —. * * * PHYLLIS DU BARRY says she just can't help loving both Buster Keaton and "Schnozzle" Durante. Yet when- ever she does a love scene with Buster she can never be quite sure whether she will be kissed or tripped up by a beer keg that Durante is playing roll-the- hoop with. "Schnozzle," by the way, is afraid of fast driving, and walks when- ever possible to the studios. * * * MADGE EVANS is a passionate de- votee of ping-pong. Many evenings will find her tapping the celluloid ball to and fro across the table of her living room. It is said that she is one of the   best players among the stars.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
LATEST SHOWS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

LATEST   SHOWS By a Woman in the Audience "STATE FAIR" I ALWAYS like Janet Gaynor, and so I did enjoy "State Fair." Of course there is not anything particularly mar- vellous about the photography, and the plot is quite commonplace, but I am not a finicky critic, and just go to the pic- tures for a pleasant evening. Janet Gay- nor is just as sweeet and unsophisticated as ever (it is so clever of her not to try to be exotic). Louise Dressler and Will Rogers are an awfully nice dad and mum. You get fond of them, even though they aren't bright enough to notice that their children had both had a love-affair on their trip, and were therefore miserable at returning home. Lew Ayres and Nor- man Foster were well cast as the young men. A particularly interesting travelogue through China precedes the main fea- ture, and has some remarkably fine photography. —State. * * * "RE-UNION IN VIENNA"   THIS is a really good show, with attrac- tive settings and photography, int...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Eve's Daughter [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

Eve's Daughter CHAPTER 1—OLD WORLD "Good-bye, Piccadilly! Farewell, Leicester Square!" IT was five o'clock on a dour March afternoon when Lilian called on her maid, Anna, for a cigarette. "I've fi n i s h e d," Lilian said; "I've packed all my undies. Where are the cigar- ettes?" "Here they are, Madam, under the dish-cover." "You put them there, Anna, so you'd know where to find them!" "Well, things are a bit upside down, Madam." "I rather think they are. The place begins to look like going away," and Lilian glanced round her studio, with its curiously attractive litter of cabin trunks, and hat boxes, and "Not Wanted on the Voyage" trunks, and lovely frocks here, there, and every- where. Lighting a cigarette, she threw herself into a big armchair covered in shining black chintz with scarlet parrots all over it. "And to think you'll be seeing those birds in their own homes soon," said prim, fiat Anna, looking sadly at the parrots as she placed an ash-tray at her mistress' elbow. "It ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
The Wanderer [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

The Wanderer   Green were the fields of my old   home, Yet greener fields I hoped to find. A poorer land I chose to roam, And left a better land behind. I tramped away across the hill, For so do other hills invite; Will o' the wisp and whip-poor-i   will I followed through the fading light; And yet upon the window-sill My mother sets a lamp to-night. The place was small, the world was wide, And youth will always have its   way, But ev'ry time I laughed I lied, Since I left home that summer's day; For there's a maiden there beside The gate, whose blushes bade me stay. I would go home, did I but dare,   But pride has filled my heart with fear. I whisper, "If I were but there!" They whisper, "If he were but here!"  

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

EVERY DAY   That Will Positively   Amaze You! Whatever the day, you will find Creed's                       store packed full with the most amaz-             ing bargains you have ever seen!       Frocks and Coats of irreproachable stan-               dards of quality and smartness all greatly             reduced for this, the most outstanding         You cannot know how far your money will             &a...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
WOMEN'S NEWS AS TOLD BY THE CAMERA..... [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

WOMEN'S NEWS AS TOLD BY THE CAMERA. MRS. COLIN ROBIN, with her champion Australian-bred St. Bernard, Princess Patricia, at the Canine Club Show at the Showground last Saturday. This was Princess Patricia's last day as a puppy. —The Australian Women's Weekly photo. HERE IS THE BEAUTIFUL Parisian who represented her country as Miss France at the Madrid Beauty Con- test. She is Mlle Jacqueline Bertin, who was chosen from 165 competitors. —Air mail photo. HISSING ACCOMPANIED the an- nouncement that Miss Russia had won the title of Miss Europe at the Interna- tional Beauty Contest at Madrid. However, Miss Spain, herself, was gracious about it, and is here seen kissing Miss Russia after the election. Miss Russia will now go to Los Angeles to contest the title of Miss Universe. —Air mail photo. -Air mail photo. THE INFLUENCE of Labor has extended to the wo- men workers of Japan. This picture shows hos- pital nurses joining in the May Day procession. Left: President Franklin D. Roosevelt fi...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

This great Selling Event begins FRIDAY, JULY 7. Our Gradual Payment System enables you to have immediate use of goods selected. stitched convertible col- lined Art. Silk. The inS larSe sütched con- W16.-Taken from racks of well-   lar and pockets and scarf collar, of Beaver vertible collar, neat belt, assorted colours and styles. Cosy j m\T^j¿J¡.^^-' J^SHkîfca^Sr?IB^EMB^BKX new Raglan sleeves, coney, fancy slip pockets, new cuff. in very good quality all- ^^Hfi^^Hi^Bwi^ll» half-lined. Cotours: trimmed , ' colours Green nark wcx)1 Jersey' neatly flared skirt. /¿J1F<SStttlH«9HHlSà^lK WM^f^llH^X Wll.-From rack Brown-Fawn effects. mea sle^es- Colours. Green, Dark trimmed raglan sleeves, and scarf i£ÉP^ ifl^MHHJVV^^RTWHHH^X of new stripes in Sizes: S.S.W., S.W., W. Sizes: S.S.W., S.W., Saxe. Sizes: S.S.W., tie to tone. Sizes: S.S.W., S.W., WÊ{ J^/WIWM ^IlMlgBaBllV All-wool Gabar Usually 75/-, W. Usually £5/15/-. S.W., W. Usually 49/11. W. Usually 27/11. l^ÄN^SÖ^^E...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Chilly Mornings Are NOT SO BAD after a GOOD BREAKFAST [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

Chilly Mornings Are NOT SO BAD after a GOOD BREAKFAST By MARGARET P. SHEPHERD DON'T RUSH your meals, especially breakfast, says Marie Dressier, famous film star. The cook often spends hours preparing tasty dishes, and it is a poor reward to see them hastily gobbled. It is not too pleasant having to get up early these cold mornings. Therefore the first meal of the day should influence our outlook, making it bright and hopeful. LET the surroundings be cheerful.   Place the table in a sunny spot. See that everything is fresh and bright. Nicely arrange flowers on the table or a bowl of fruit. The meal should be light and nourish- ing, commencing with fruit juice, stewed fruit or sliced oranges, or grapefruit. Followed by a cereal and hot milk, and the piece de resistance made of eggs, meat, fish, or cheese. BREAKFAST SUGGESTIONS Baked prunes, oatmeal with milk, banana and bacon, toast, honey, coffee. Sliced oranges, crispies with milk, mush- rooms with scrambled egg, wholem...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
THE KISS of DEATH [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

THE KISS of DEATH AGATHA MAYNARD awakened with a gasp of terror. She lay still, shivering under the many layers of cosy bed-coverings. It was pitch dark in the room, and the silence was broken only by the intermittent flapping of the blind behind the heavy curtains. Her hand crept up and touched the spot on her right cheek where two warm lips had rested in the caress that had startled her out of dream- land. Had she dreamed it? Shame suf- fused her withered cheeks at the very thought. Was there someone in the room? Her virgin being revolted at the idea of such a visitation. She sat up in bed, clutching the clothes about her own indignant form. She groped for the acorn hanging from the ceiling, pressed the switch and flooded the sombre, oak-panelled chamber with amber radiance. Her gaze darted to the door. The brass bolt she had shot before re- tiring still rested in its socket. No one could have entered that way without her acquiescence. She glanced round the square, low-ceilinged r...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
EXCITING RECIPE CONTEST Attracts Hundreds of ENTRIES [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 8 July 1933

EXCITING RECIPE CONTEST Attracts Hundreds of ENTRIES From other States, from city and from country, readers vie with one another for the £5 Recipe Prize offered by The Australian Women's Weekly. Your favorite dish may win £5 or one of the six 5/- consolation prizes. Send   yours along for next week's competition. CONSOLATION PRIZES OF 5/- TO THE FOLLOWING : TASTY FISH DISH Take 1 large fresh bream, wash and dry the fish. Trim the fins, rub the inside of the fish with lemon. Make a seasoning with 2 table- spoons of bread-crumbs, 1 tablespoon of chopped parsley, a little grated lemon rind, 1 teaspoon of butter, salt and pepper to taste, and 1 egg. Mix all ingredients together, binding it with the egg. Stuff the fish, fasten with a skewer, place on a greased baking dish, cover with a piece of buttered paper. Bake in a mod- erate oven for half an hour. Serve hot and garnish with slices of lemon. 5/ to Mrs. R. Ayling, No. 5 Queen Street, Petersham. POTATO CRABS Peel and grat...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x