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Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Ch... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 28,405 items from Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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COOKERY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

COOKERY, ♦ ChOOSO Hloa.-Into a situoopnn pub I butter Hi.. m«c of u ivalnnt, let it col „ light brown, mix into it a pint I I l'ico, lit 11 uhhI parsley, oiilt and I put it. i.1 tlio buttor, st.rgent | |v until heated, roiuovo from the t"o I uml add uu ounco of grated cheese, j ti.vn into » b°l di!ih ll"J Bl"lllUu el.ceso over tho top. i prune Sov.(Ito.-l!eal the whites of I six oggs u» » stiff froth and add one | third teaspoonful of crosmi Y^Vtlusni the yolks of three er.U* >»"» liad tlu-n lo a pint of cooked a.ul sweetened prunes that have boon P»'ked up mo fine bit. j mix lightly into tho bcawn whites and bako in u butteredP»d,J * dish set iu a of wulor ° hour. Baltod oranfios.—llnko a dovirod millibar of sour oranges m ft model ate oven for twenty minutes; open at ono ond and remnvo the in Jdc; BWooton with ™gar 1"1<1 I up with one out'. and 11 '' of dissolved goltitine, then hll tlio onmgo cups and drop a spoonful of whipped cream on top instead o pu j ting the c...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FLYING FINN. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

THE FLYING FINN. Trainers and aspiring- athletes might do a lot worse than study the methods employed by Hannes Kolehmainen, otherwise known as the "Flying Finn." Many experts arc of the opinion that he is the greatest runner they have ever seen. Yet, when stripped, the most practised eye can see nothing very ex ceptional about him. His height is five feet seven inches, and his normal weight about nine Btone. He is an amateur. Smoothness is the most notable feature of his leg muscles. It is said the muscles of his calves are so loose and pliable that it is possible to put your finger between them and touch the bone. And yet he lias done the ten miles in 51min. 6 8-5 sec.—and indoora, too ! His muscles were obtained by a secret system of massage learned in Finland, and Hannes says, quite frank ly, that this method of kneading and rubbing makes him many seconds fast er. He is only twenty-three years of uge at present, and great things are. cxpected of him.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ANIMAL WEATHER PROPHETS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

ANIMAL WEATHER PROPHETS. Cat's fur is full of electricity, and before a thunderstorm a cat is always extremely lively and playful, probably 011 account of its electrical condition, tteforo rain is expected you will soo a cat assiduously washing its face. Donkeys will bray budly and con tinuously at tho approach of a storm. If rows lio down in tho early morning instead of feeding, or huddlo together with their tails to windward, then there is rain about. * Like cats, tho approach of a thunder storm makes cows oxtremoly frisky. They run up and down tho field and butt imaginary obstacles at such times. Shoop.. turn their heads to tho wind when tho day is going to ho fine. Bub if they grazo with their tails to wind ward it is a suro sign of rain, so ox porionced shepherds >ay. Liko oows, too, they' show an unusual Hroliness at tho .approach of a storm. Even tho sedato pig is watchod by country , weather prophets, for it is always un easy when rain is coming. Most birds are rcstloBB w...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE TELEPHONE IN ABYSSINIA. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

THE TELEPHONE IN ABYSSINIA. I Though nearly eight hundred miles of telophono wire have been put up in Abbyssinia, the contractor who is do ing tlio work for the Government has to encounter unusual diOicultios. Tropical rains wash out the poles, whit© ants eat away the parts in the ground, and whon iron polos are substituted for wood • the natives steal them to make tools of. Monkeys tlnd the wires delightful swings, whilo olophunts use the poles as scratching posts, and of ton knock them down. The jungle growB so fast that a party of men is kept constantly employed in cutting away the young growth.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ILLUMINATION BY PHOSPHOROUS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

ILLUMINATION BY PHOS > PHOROtJS. Phosphorous is sometimes used for illuminating purposes, but the light is rather dim. The method is as follows, and it is serviceable when moans *of striking a match are not at hand:— Take a long and narrow vial of the whitest and clearest glass; put in a piece of phosphorous about the size of a pea, upon which pour somo olive oil heated to boiling-point; fill the vial about one-third full, and then seal the vial hermetically. To use it, remove tlio cork and allow the air to enter the vial and then recork it. The empty space in the bottlo will then become luminous, and the light obtained will bo equal to that of a dull lamp. As soon as the light becomes weak its power can be increased by opening the vial and allowing a fresh supply of air to enter. In winter it is sometimes neces sary to lieat the vial between the hands to increase the fluidity of the oil. Thus prepared, tho vial may be used for six montlis.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE WRONG IDEA. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

THE WRONC IDEA. Little James sat at his desk listen ing- intently to the teacher, who was explaining the meaning1 of the word "income." The teacher, noticing his concen tration, addressed most of her re marks to him. When she had made the subject as clear as it could pos sibly be made, she felt fairly confident of success as she asked James to step up to the blackboard, write a sentence containing' the word "income," and then read it out to the class. James sprang to his feet, flushed with pride, and bursting with know ledge. After much writing and rubbing out, he read his sentence aloud: "In come a cat!"

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"SOLESTRY." [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

"SOLESTRY." Known as "Solestry,*1 tho now scioneo which enables au export to tall what wort of man or woman a baby will be by studying tho feet, may prove to bo ol' tho greatest vuluo whim i.p plied to criminology; for, while it can rovuai nothing about a person'* lougth ol' liio or health, it has so much to do with tho moral nature that, according to Countess Meiusino, a woU-known .Frenchwoman who has discovered tliiu new science, it is possiblo with its aid to dotoct criminal instincts. Tho countoss, who lms been permitt ed by tho Parisian police to study tho foot of criminals in gaol, says she has novcr examined tho foot ol a murdor or whoso big toe was not pronounced in its shortness and stumpiness, even in comparison with tho other toos, which aro goneraljy short in criminals. Tho big toe that is rather largo and turns decidedly towards tho other toos is found in porsons of a sensually passionato nature. Seventy-nino ol' the eighty-two women deported from Franco last year for c...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SURPRISED THE SPEAKER. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

SURPRISED THE SPEAKER. Thin, angular and spinsterish, Miss | Miggs^strodo through the streets of the little village rounding up the house wives to eonio to to-night's meeting; of tho ''Hopeful Society" on "How Hub hands Should be Fed." The little hall was fairly full by 8 o'clock, when Miss Miggs, with her select committee of old maids, pranced on to the platform and began her ora tion. Not Mnueh inspiration was to be gained from tho audienco, A littlo human touch is what is needed, thought Miss Miggs to herself, to enliven tho proceedings. Putting on her best im itation of a smiley slve advanced to tho front of the platform. "So many of you women," she start ed, "aro not sympathetic enough with your husbands. Now," she simperod, "if I had a husband and he came homo—or—late, I should not rave at him, but simply go and kiss him." "And servo the brute right!" yelled a retreating form at the back of the hall.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TO DO AND TO DARE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

TO DO AND TO DARE. *'There's always a river to cross, Always uii effort to make. If there's anything good to win, Any rich prize to take. Yonder's the fruit we crave, Yonder's tho charming scene; But deep and wide, with a troubled tide Is 'the river that lies between.' "The rougher the way wo take, The stouter tho heart aud nerve; Tho stone in our path we break, Nor o?er from our impulse swerve. For the glory we hope to win Our labours we count no loss; 'Tis folly to pause, aud murmur be cause Of 'tho river we have to cross.' "So, ready to and to dare. Should we in our places stand; And thoroughly well we'll faro In fulfilling life's demand. For though as the mountains high The billows may roar and toss, They'll not overwhelm if Right's at tho helm "When wo 'have a river to cross.' ,J

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
POETRY OF THE WEEK. GRIN AND BEAR IT. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

POETRY OP THE WEliK. 3111N AM) liKAR IT. It's easy to stnilo and bo cheerful When everything's pleasant and lair; Wo never complain oi life's hardships Wiieu there are no burdens to bear. But soon as the blue skies cloud over, And the way thai was Muooih has Urown rougti, We torget tho blithe solids wo were Milling And our tacos are doleful euou&U. Hut some can be cheerful when .shadows Arc thick round the pathways they tread; Thov sing in their happiest measures With a faith in the blue skies o'or head. They taeo with a smile that's like sun shiuo The trials that- come in their way, Aud they always find much to be glad for In the lonesomest, dreariest day. Thank God for the num who is cheerful 111 spite of life's troubles, I say. Who smgs of ;v brighter tomorrow Heeanse of the clouds of to-day. His life is a beautiful 6enuou, And this is ita lessou to uie: Moot trials with smiles and they van ish ; Face cares with a song and they tleo.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AMERICAN HUMOUR. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

AMERICAN HTJMOTJE. Tho power of Language.—"I can't got that woman 10' talco any frost air," complained tlio young physiciuu. You don't uoJd your advice pro perly," said tho old doctor. "Toil her U> perambulate daily in tho park, tak oopioub inhalation of ozouo."—* "WiL^iiiu^tou ILatulil,'S Tho Wrong Hunch—"Yos ho was sa^in^, ^ ^ of fact, a uiuix docHii't really ioaru what happiness leauy is tin til ho iK married." "I'm glad you've discovered that at last," I'upJii_*d sho, with visions of im 2Modi/ita /jfoposai. "los," Jio continued; "and when bo's married it's ..,0 laic. "—"Brook lyn Citizen." * * « « A Sorious Error—"You've made a mistake in your- paper," said tho in tliguaui> muu, entering ihu editorial sanctum. "I was ono oi' tho coinpoti tois -rt the atlilotiu match yosterday, aud you'vo called uio tho well-known light-weight champion/1 Well, aren't, you," said the editor. ''No, I'm nothing of the kind; and it's confoundedly awkward, because, you see, I'm a; ooul morchaat....

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE GERMAN GROWN PRINCE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

THE CERMAN GROWN PRINCE. A sentimental young lady onco asked tlio German Crown Princo whothor ho was not filled with perploxity when ho looked up at tho stars. "Not at all," replied tho Princo, with a mischievous smile; "they are the decorations con ferred by my august father on his creator." Berlin delights in _thoso sly digs at tho sorious • and strenuous character of tho Emperor, and tho Crown Prince is consequently very popular. But ho is nono tho worse for his sons© of humor. Thought once awnkened does not slumber.—Curlyle.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FACTS AND FANCIES. Crass Skirts. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

FACTS AND FANCIES. « Crass Skirts. i ho woiiiou mid ^irls in many parts ui Now Citiinuu wuar u skirt ol' nativo Uia.ss, which luin^b down Irom tho waist to tlio knoo, oach pieuo oi gruMB being plaiUxi into a strong encircling bolt at tho top. Tlio material may ubio bo cocoanut or banana, loaves, tho lonnor linoly hhn.-ddod with a sholl. Somotimea tho f$ra.ss used is laid in tho mud and stained bhick, or reddened by tho juiro of a root, and tho threo col oui-m, rod, black and light brown, aro blundod very harmoniously.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Troo-Fork as Plough. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

Troo-Fork as Plough. All farming operations in Morocco arc carried on under primitive meth od*; the plough used by the natives is the fork of a tree, to which is affix ed an iron tooth producing a furrow •scarcely 3in. deep. The seed ia sown thinly over the surface of the soil, and such an instrument as the harrow is entirely unknown. Heaping is effected by hand sickles of the crudest pattern, and the sheaves are transported on small donkeys and deposited on an open space, where the grain is thresh ed under the tread of marcs and colts.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Friendly Greeting in Foreign Lands. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

Friontlly erecting in Foroign Lands. 1 ho Arabians shako hands six or night times. Onco is not enough, should, liowovor, thoy bo persons of distinction, thoy ombraoo mid kiss one another several times and also kiss their own bands. Tn Turkoy tlio greet ing is to placo tho lmnd upon tho breast, which is l>oth graceful and ap propriate. In Uurmah, when a man meets a woman, ho puts his nose and mouth close to her cheek and draws ft long breath, as if inhaling a delicious perfumo, but, strango to say, lie does not kiss her cheek. A man is greeted in exactly tho saino way. How Indians Made Arrow-head9. Tho old Indian art of making flint arrow-heads was not bo difficult as is usually imagined—white men are mak ing "old and genuine" Indian arrow heads now for commercial purposes and by the old Indian methods. Flint ia not chipped with stono or with metal, but with water. When an Indian wish ed to mako an arrow-head, ho hold a pioce of Hint in a fire until it was very hot and then allowe...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
How Indians Catch Wild Duck. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

How Indians Catch Wild Duck. The natives in some parts of India catch duck by the use of a "gurrah," or earthen jar. One or two of these are allowed to float on the water where duck are in the habit of collecting, in order that they may bccome accustom ed to the sight of such an apparition. A few days will suflice for this, and then the native shikari pierces some holes in the side of a "gurrah," places it over his head, and, thus accoutred, moves in among the unsuspecting birds, and, by a rapid downward jerk with one hand, disposes of duck after duck It is a form of trapping requir ing the greatest skill and cunning, since the duck is one of the wariest of birds.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Some Famous Cripples. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

Somo Famous Cripplao. Talleyrand, the notorious French statesman, friend of Napoleon and Ambassador at the English Court, was designed for a military career, but an accident when one year old rendered him a cripple for life. His cunning, cleverness, political penetration, adroit intrigues, and ingenious subterfuges, were vehemently opposed by the Em peror's wife. Josephine, who energeti cally denounced him as a "cursed cripple." •• Josiah Wedgwood, the famous potter and scientist, suffered from a disease of 'the right knee which necessitated the amputation of tho limb. Referring to the infirmity, Mr. Gladstone once declared: "It sent his mind inward; it drove him to meditate upon the laws and secrets of his art. The result was that he arrived at a preception and grasp of them which might, perhaps, have been envied by an Athenian potter." The early days of John Flaxman, who designed the choicest specimens of Wedgewood ware, were spent be hind his father's shop counter, propped up by ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CAN WE FORETELL THE FUTURE? [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

CAN WE FORETELL THE FUTURE? Tlio scionbiBt of to-day who refuses to believe ui tho power of thought* transmission, or telepathy, is regarded as old-1'ushionud and unscientific, though nearly aJl scientists of note sneered at it a short thirty- year« ago. The power of prophecy yesterday, in common with most other phenomena oulsido tho physical piano, was regard ed by scientists as baseless auporsLi tion. To-day somo of tho world's moat eminent mon of science, like Cenaro Lombroso, aftor exhaustive experi ments, have oven avowed their belief in tho powor accurately to foretell iiio future. This laat avowal is the most staggering attack of all upon material scienco. If prophecy be possible, wo aro on tho border of » revolution in our daily lives. It must bo remember jd, writes Shaw Desmond in ''Tho London Magazine," that practically all theso great scientists woro sceptics who, naturally, at tho commcncomeut of thoir investigation regarded the whole thing as humbug. It is cortain, from...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
VERY BITTER. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

VERY BITTER. A man who frequently visits & scien tific friend a short distanco out of town onco found him in liis laboratory study ing a dark brown .substance spread out on a sheet of paper. "I say, • Jones," said the scientific person, when greetings had been duly exchanged, "would you mind letting ino place a bit of this on your tongue? My tasto has become sadly vitiated by trying all sorts of things." "Certainly," responded the accom modating friend, and ho promptly open ed his mouth. The professor took some of the sub stanco under analysis and put it on his friend's tonguo, whereupon the visitor worked it around in his mouth for fully a minute, tasting it ari ho might havo sampled a choico confection. ''Noto any effect?" asked tho pro fessor.. "No especial effect." "It doesn't paralyse or prick your tonguo?" "Not that I can detect." "I didn't think it would. Thero are no alkaloids in it, then. How does it tasto?" "Vory bitter." "Very bitter, eh?" Then, after a pause, "Al...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DANCERS IN FLOWERS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 February 1914

DANCERS IN FLOWERS. Flowers of the jonquil, white hya cinth, and snowdrop all possess a poisonous nature, tho narcissus being also particularly deadly, so much so, indeed, that to chew a small scrap of one of the bulbs may result fatally, while the juice of tho leaves is au emetic. The berries of tho yew have killed many porsons, and it is pretty well known nowadays that it is not safe to oat many punch pips or cherry kernels at once. Tho lobelias aro all dangerous. Lady's slipper poisons in the samo manner as does poison ivy. The bulbs seem to bo the most harm ful. Lilies of tho vallev are also as much so. Tiiero is enough opium in red poppies to do mischief; and tho autumn crocus, if tho blossoms aro chewed, causes vomiting and purging. Tho loaves and flowers of tho oleander aro deadly, and the bark of tho catalpa treo is very mischievous; the water dropwort, when not in flower, resom bles celery and is virulent.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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