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Elephind.com contains 4,114 items from Direct Action, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Subscribers: Please Note. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 16 October 1915

Subscribers: ? »- — Please Note. ? * ? Subscribers should note that now we have become a weekly, the yearly sub sreiption to the paper will be four shillings; half-yearly, two shillings. Those who have already subscribed will be supplied with a weekly copy un til their subscription runs out, on the terms now prevailing. If we are to continue as a weekly, it is imperative that all interested should immediately support the paper by send ing their subs, at once, or renewing xne oia as soon as possiuie. A little effort on the part of all mem bers now, will obviate in the future those painful appeals for financial help which so often characterise revolution ary organs. 'Direct Action' is one of the very few working class papers that never looked back since its inception. It depends upon YOU that its repu tation in this direction shall not suffer in the future. Remember, without a press all other propaganda is useless.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Worker's "Privilege". [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 16 October 1915

The Worker's 'Privilege'. The 'Sydney Morning Herald' has its usual benevolent wellin tentioned and fatherly word for the workers on Eight-hours' Day. After pointing out to the State Governments, and employers of labor generally, that they need not now be so nervous about a large unemployed* population as at 'the beginning oi: the war, as 'when the war tirst broke out it was essential to support the labor market or witness a complete col lapse of our (mark that 'our') industrial system,'' it goes on to inform us that: 'These are not times for the workers to bo. over- particular about conditions of la bor or wages, or hours of labor. It should be their privilege to work hard and work long. Unless they realise this, then the day will come when they may be forced to do at the hands of German task masters.'' You see the ''Herald' is so so licitous for the workers' future that it warns them of the calam ity in store for them if German leeches are allowed to suck away their life-blood ins...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Status of the Soldier. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 16 October 1915

The Status of die Soldier. I ? ? ?? ? ~'~ Certain khaki-clad gentlemen I (paternally referred to 'by the I capitalist press as 'our boys''). I looming prominently in the public I rye at the present time, lead us to I enquire, 'What is the soldier, and ? -ivliat is his status as compared I with the 'ordinary common or I garden' working man!' I A soldier is a member of the I proletarian class, who sells his one ? possession, labor-power, on the I market, just like any other work ? m'fi man. His status is therefore ? ill at of the worker. The fact that ? hi- contracts for a service of dan H g«'i- does not affect his industrial I sliindingat all. More men are dis ? allied and slain in factory, field I ami workshop than ever Avere kill ? eri iii warfare. I Nor does the fact that the solr ? tli---i- is a non-producer alter his ? status. Many, accepted in trade I union membership as bona-fide ? nn'iiibers of the working class, are ? to ??:11 intents and purposes non ? producers. Workers en...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
I.W.W. Preamble. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 16 October 1915

I.W.W. Preamble. ? O ? The working class and the employing class have nothing in common. There can be no peace so long as hunger and want are found among millions of working people, and the few who make up the employing class have all the good things of life. Between these two classes a struggle must go on until the workers of the world organise as a class, take possession of tlie earth -and the machinery of production, and abolish the wage system. * We find that the centreing of the management of industries into fewer and fewer hands makes the trade unions unable to cope 'with the ever-growing power of the employing class. The trade unions foster a state of affairs which allows one set of .workers to be pitted against another set of workers in the same industry, thereby helping to defeat one another in wage wars. Moreover, the trade unions aid the employing class to mislead the workers into the belief that the working-class have interests in common with their em ployers. These cond...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 16 October 1915

Do you know more about the war in Europe than the war on the job? Which affectB you most? H ? ? ? H Make the job last, if you don't want ? to joiu the unemployed.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 16 October 1915

I MELBOURNE ACTIVITIES. I Lotr.'. No. 8, 243 William-street — I Monday, 8 p.m., Business Meeting. I Thursday, Propaganda Committee I Meets. I Friday, 8 p.m. — Propaganda Meeting at I South Melbourne Market. I Saturday, 8 p.m. — Educational Lecture I at Hall. I Saturday, 8 p.m. — Propaganda Meeting I at Flinders Park (Yarra Bank). I Library and Beading Room Open ? every night. Working-class Papers on I file. Industrial Union Literature on I sale. All rebels are asked to blow I along and make themselves known. AH I slaves will be welcome. I J. LAWRENCE, I Secretary-Treasurer. I BROKEN HILL ACTIVITIES. I .Rooms, Palace Buildings, Sulphide-.. I street. I Wednesday Evening, at 7.30 p.m. — Edu- I cational Class. I Alternate Sundays, at 3 p.m. — Business I Meeting. I Alternate Sundays, at 3 p.m.— Econo- I nomic Class. Sunday, at 7.30 p.m. — Outdoor Propa ganda Meeting, near Post Office, in Argent-street. Good Library. Also good collection of Literature for sale. All live rebels welcome. E....

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BARKER DEFENCE FUND. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 23 October 1915

BARKER DEFENCE FUND. In acknowledging sub from J. Wilson in our last issue, 1/- should have read £1. A sub. of 1/- from J. Luitjens was also omitted. Tom McMillan has sent in £3. Since the case concluded the fol lowing sums have been received and returned : — Amalgamated Society of Car penters and Joiners, Broken Hill, £1 : Australian Meat Industry Em ployees' Union, Melbourne, £2 2s.; Amount previously acknow ledged, £118 11s. 8|d. Total of Fund, £122 12s. 8*d. ' A balance-sheet will be issued when expenses in connection with the case are finally wound up.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT DOES HE MEAN? Notes from a Hobo. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 23 October 1915

WHAT DOES HE MEAN? Notes from a Hobo. After some of the slaves got fired from the Boulder, W.A., they made down to the agricultural dis tricts for the harvest. I beat it from the Cross to Northam, and left. I.W.W. dope and papers all along the line. At Northam, we fell in with some Swedish fellow workers, and we put in good pro paganda all the way to Gormal ling ; here we struck F. W. ' Pie man,' and a couple of Swiss slaves. TC jI _ i -I i ir me master ciass Keep us on the move this year, I.W.W. propa ganda will begin to spread. When you meet a fellow-worker now, the first question he asks is, 'Is Tom Barker still in gaol?' Some of the Federal Senators have large farms in this State. Nuff sed. 'THE KITTEN.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The South African Hubbub. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 23 October 1915

The South African Hubbub. Latest advices ' 'from South' Africa would appear to indicate that the political regime of Botha, Smuts & Co., is in serious jeo pardy. Coalition with the Mine owners party for electioneering purposes against the 'rabid Dutch section, combined with the Labor party, will hardly save them. ' Although there are many aspects ui. uiu lauur qutouiuu ill ouulu Africa, it is not difficult to pre dict the outcome of all this politi cal pandemonium from a working class standpoint. The fact that the Labor Party, which is supposedly iu favour of the workers' interests against all political and industrial factions, finds itself co-operating with the Hertzogites, a remnant of the Kruger caste, with all that caste's conservatism, its religious, poli tical and economic superstitions, is one more illustration of the side issues and irrelevaneies into which the workers are led once they take up the so-called Aveapon of politi cal action. The position iu South Africa ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MELBOURNE ACTIVITIES. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 23 October 1915

MELBOURNE ACTIVITIES. Local No. 8, 243 William-street— Monday, S p.m., Business Meeting. Thursday, Propaganda Committee Meets. Friday, 8 p.m. — Propaganda Meeting at South Melbourne Market. Saturday, S p.m. — Educational Lecture at Hall. Saturday, S p.m. — Propaganda Meeting at Flinders Park (Yarra Bank). Library and Beading Boom Open every night. 'Working-class Papers on file. Industrial Union Literature on sale. All rebels are asked to blow along and make themselves known. All slaves will be welcome. J. LAWRENCE, Secretary-Treasurer.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Good "Reason" [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 23 October 1915

A Good 'Reason' The following is an excerpt from our contemporary, the 'Maoriland. Worker,' dated October 6, 1915: 'The I. W.W. has been ten years in existence in America, having originated as the result of a huge Congress iu 1905. To commemorate the birthday, a special number 'of 'Solidarity' was issutju. jll was an excellent production, and miles ahead of the usual I.W.W. journalistic standard. A perusal of its mat ter would really make the Wil liam-Joseph Fusion, of Maori land, wonder why they had vetoed its admission into this country. ' ' We have, therefore, learned at last why the boss objects to the I.W.W. Press in Maoriland. At last the cat is out of the bag. The Massey-Ward Government objects* to the journalistic get-up of our papers. Perhaps we are not a good advertising medium for Messrs. Fat and Company, and maybe we are too prone to leave the clouds of Fabianism and the worship of G.B. Shaw, and get down to the mundane prosaic work of organising on the iob. 'The Maorila...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Our Standpoint. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 23 October 1915

Our Standpoint. . — » ? The recent stink created in Par liament over the payment of mem bers ' expenses, who were engaged in the late recruiting campaign, reminds one forcibly of Dr. John son's definition of Patriotism. It is easy to be a good and loyal citizen on a couple of quid a day. The workers should now be able to judge at its true value the perfer vid oratory of the paid patriots on the street corners. The assumed indigation of the politicians who caused the row is not likely to de ceive anvbodv. Jealousy, because of their exclusion from the 'be- ano' had more to do with their protests than any virtues of hon esty they themselves possess. The question occurs: Why are men jailed for making statements like ly to prejudice recruiting when the New South Wales politicians are allowed to be at large? The clique of rooks and crooks behind Holiuan should never see the out side walls of a prison if justice wcr nov as scarce a commodity in New South Wales as water is in hell. ? # # Th...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HARVESTERS! [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 23 October 1915

HARVESTERS! Members striking out for the harvest fields should arm themselves with a supply of Subscription Cards for 'Direct Action.' Don't miss such a splendid opportunity for Propoganda. Make the job last, if you don 't want to join the unemployed.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"Stickers" and a Story. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 23 October 1915

'Stickers' and a Story. _ ? * ? We shearing men are a nomadic lot. We blow, as it were, wherever the wind of employment listetk. During the course of my recent travels in search of a master, I spent a night in that town which lias the misfortune to be repre sented by the chief villian of the N.S.W. Labour Party; and what more natural than, in my peregrinations of the even ing, I should seek to counteract the evil effects thereof, with the aid of that quiet, but effective means of getting in. the dope, namely 'stickers.' The office window of the local rag I found to foe decorated with a medley of war cartoons, recruiting posters, and be lated war repprts, and, having an eye for the artistic, I sought to relieve its monotony by placing thereon a few of the aforesaid stickers. On passing the office next morning, I was attracted by a bareheaded old fellow, minus a coat, who, I surmised, was the Annanias responsible for the rag. He held a large, open pocket-knife in one hand, and was ges...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Scabbery at Mittagong. (To "Direct Action.") [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 23 October 1915

Scabbery at Mittagong. (To 'Direct Action.') I wish to bring cutting enclosed, from the official organ of the R.W. and G.L.A. ('Navvy,' 4th Oct.), under your no tice, and point out to you the sort of men that we have got at the head of our union. I might say it has been a great shock to our members, and I have not the least doubt but our President and General Secretary will be called to account for it. I take my hat off to the 57 men who refused to be led by the no.se to work with a scab, and to mj jiiiiiu, wiicre uicib was one scao before, Rosser and Bodkin succeeded in adding 79 more. In answer to Ros ser, I might state that tsie Union is on a better footing to-day than ever, and the labour market is not in such a bad state, as there is any amount of har vesting and other public works, where the men could get employment if the worst happened. The real reason Ros ser and Co. do not want trouble is be cause they do not want to disturb the accumlated funds, but to conserve same for t...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Racial Antipathy. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 23 October 1915

Racial Antipathy. In organising all workers into One Big Union, the chief diffi culty lies in racial antipathy. This antipathy has an influence upon the relations of the races which is something to be. reckoned with, and may prove to be the chief ob stacle in the harmony of the whites, browns and yellows of the genus homo. Pni'cfmal fiimfiam fllwnvs t.pviris to make a difference between in dividuals into something appear ing to be a sign of superiority to members of opposite races ; thus we find the white worker thinking himself superior to the yellow, and the yellow worker thinking him self superior to either white or black ; whereas they are all on' the same economic footing, being victims, or jwssible victims, of the capitalistic exploiter, who is craf ty enough to use racial differences to promote dissension and check, if: not prevent; the world wide un ion necessary for the existence of a stable, united and happy society. One thing favorable to the pro motion of united action b...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 23 October 1915

NOTICE. Any member knowing the where abouts of R, J. (Dick) Welch is re quested to communicate with J. W. Welch, 144 Auburn-street, Goulbnrn. ' EXPIRED.' Subscribers who find a stamp 'Ex- pired,' upon their paper, are notified ?thereby that, their subscription will ex pire during the following month. That I will give subscribers ample time to re new their subscriptions. Terms, 4/- per year, 2/- per half-year. Address, ' ' Man

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL No. 6. HALL, LANE ST., BOULDER, W.A. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 23 October 1915

ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL No. 6. HALL, LANE ST., BOULDER, W.A. Wednesday Evenings, in Hall — Class Meeting. Friday Evening, Boulder Post Office — Propaganda Meeting. Saturday Evening, Kalgoorlie — Propa- ganda Meeting. Sunday Morning, 10.30 a.m., Hall — Business Meeting. Sunday Afternoon, Keane's Goldfields Hotel, Athletic Club, at 2.30— Lec- ture. Sunday Evening, Boulder — Propaganda Meeting. Good Library at Hall. All Keds are Invited to dig in and make Industrial 'Unionism the Topic of the Day. R H. LUNN. Push the sale of 'Direct Action.' The boss loves it.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
State Socialism at Wonthaggi. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 23 October 1915

State Socialism at Wonthaggi. The slaves of the State coal mine at Wonthaggi, Victoria, have been having a very trying time of late. Distress and hardships have made their marks upon the lives of the coalies, in that Statecon trolled town, discontent and strife is in the air, and there is rumor of strike. The coal-miners are in a fog as to what methods* they can adopt for* the best, but it looks as if the Arbitration Court will be asked to settle their trouble for them. If the eoal miners want to gain bet ter conditions, they must leave all courts of law seriously alone, and resort to direct action on the job. The spectacle of an Arbitration Court should make the working class vomit with disgust. The safest and surest way to settle any dispute is by using direct action and sabotage. If the miners know what they want, why go to a judge to hear all about it? The employees of the State mine are treated with the utmost con lempt when they appeal to the Commissioners for better condi tio...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Innisfail, N. Q. Doings at the Sugar Mills. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 23 October 1915

Innisfail, N. Q. ? ♦ — . — Doings at the Sugar Mills. The season's crushing at Goondi I Mills has been marked by unusual B activity of the workers.' A num. B ber of enlightened slaves have at fl least, partially, succeeded in r0Us. H ing the worker to a truer realise B tion of the position of master and B man. ;B At the outset of the crushi™ B the officials of the A.W.U. endear' B ored to aeoar tne Japanese work- S er the right to live, but without fl success. ^m In the two adjoining milk^B South Johnstone and Mourilyaa ^bI the workers, without the sauctioi-^B of the A.W.U. officials, succeeds ^B by direct action in gaining an in. ^m crease of w,ages and other conces^^H sions. ^m The Goondi workers sought to B follow the example. With the H complete solidarity of all sections, BJ including Japanese, they were ?? about to use the same methods of ^B direct action, when the officials oi^^^B the A.W.U. succeeded in nullify- fl ing their power, with the result fl that the conditions rema...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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