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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

P'TfffiW " " "fl Till? INDIAN AlJVOCATK. I08 A dispatch from Montery, Mex., of recent date says: '.' . "Nearly forty years ago several hundred members of the tribe of Kickapoo Indians removed from the United States to Mex ico and located in the state of Coahuila. Their numbers have increased until the colony now numbers several thousand. They are engaged in agriculture and have made good citizens. A delegation of Kickapoos representing the portion of the tribe living in Indian territory, are now in the City of Mexico con ferring with officials of the Mexican government with a view of obtaining a concession for a large tract of land adjoining the other Kickapoos in Coahuila, on which it is proposed to locate the remaining members of the divided tribe. Congress has done one good thing for the Indian Territo ry, by making every Indian a citizen of the United States and therefore no longer a ward of the government. We say it is a good thing because it conforms to a law of civilization a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

109 The Indian Advocate. the government agreed to buy. The work of surveying and allotting the lands has been commenced, and when finished the land will be thrown open, and as it is very desirable for grazing and farming, home-seekers are already looking over the ground, and the whole strip will be taken up and settled upon this season. According to the instructions of the new Encyclical ex tending to the whole world the indulgences proclaimed last year for Rome, the bishop of each diocese will designate a day on which the Jubilee privilege begins; and from that date for a space of six months all the faithful even those who have already "made the Jubilee" in Rome or (as religious in their convents) in exempted places many gain a plenary indul gence by fulfilling the conditions which will be laid down in the bishop's letter. The other usual privileges of a Jubilee may also be enjoyed; for example, all regularly approved con fessors have the faculty during the six months designated of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

wTixnWNatyi wfyPtgiiipy"' ywnwmwiwi Fhe Indian Advocate. . 110 the past half-hundred years shows an ever decreasing tally, whose souls should be all the dearer to us because like the setting sun on their own boundless prairies, the disappearing children of the forest are silently, patiently, stoically sinking beneath the horizon into that bourn whence no traveller returns. Hence we let the Indians speak for themselves; artlessly and touohingly so. Their voice seems the re-echo of the ever-to-be-remembered appeal of Logan, so of ted heard -and read in our childhood. The above mentioned petition reads as follows: "We, the undersigned, etc., respectfully beg to state, that our school fund has been permanently withdrawn from us, by the Department, which was formerly given to the Sac red Heart Indian School, for the education of our children. We might send our children to Government schools, but many of our people are strictly conscientious in the faith they have been brought up in and f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

i- wffwywwiyfl; in Thi: Tndian Advocate. country. It must have cost them $150,000, because the lum ber was hauled from Atoka, a distance of 75 miles. Now we are unable, for the reason set forth, to give them our support, as our people are too poor to send their children to the Bene dictine school out of their private means, and we appeal to your Eminence to devise some ways and means that 25 or 30 of our Indian children might be sent to their school. We have also applied to Ven. Rev. F. Stephan, Director of the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions, and to Ven. Katharine Drexel to the same effect." Easter Morning. TiHAT shall 1 bring Thee, Loid: For the ciown of thorns and the jibing tongue, And Thy tender body on Calvary hung, For the gall and the cruel sword, What shall 1 bring Thee Lord? What dost Thou give me Lord? For a crown of thorns, a crown of peace, From the cross of sin a sweet release, From evil deed and word A sweet deliverance, Lord. Then shall 1 greet Thee, Lord Glad, wi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

v-r-C wmM.wmmMmmm pp3FH Thk Indian Advocate. 112 m The Resurrection of the Lord. ThricB had the sun gone down upon the earth and all as yet, was silent at the sepulchre. Death held his sceptre over Son of God. Still and silent the hours passed on, the guards stood at their posts; the rays of the midnight moon gleamed on their helmets and on their spears. The enemies of Christ ex ulted in their success; the hearts of his friends were sunk in despondency; the spirits of glory waited in anxious suspense to behold the event, and wondered at the depth at the ways of God. At length the morning star, arising in the east, announced the approach of light. The third clay began to dawn upon the world; when all of a sudden the earth trembled to its centre; and the powers of heaven were shaken; an angel of God de scended: the guards shrunk back from the terror of his pres ence, and fell prostrate on the ground. "His countenance was like lightning, and his raiment white as snow." He rolled away t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

" -'fgipffiW ' "'ip 113 . The Indian Advocate... illlY RHw'w1rk1 R(Sl!fflliPR) vJTllf ail yy-y CHILDREN IN THE MONASTERY. The heading of this article will find little sympathy with those tiat look at the Monastery as a penitentiary, who see little difference between a cloister and a prison. They may probably say: The Monastery is all right for an old man that has no home and no bread; for a penitent sinner who is afraid of God's judgments; or for a cranky person, who gets in trouble with every one around him in society. But what a foolish and cruel idea it is to deprive a young boy of what he likes best and needs most: liberty, independence, the free exercise of his mental and physical faculties. Was not once the in mate of a cloister denned by a great man: "He who is tired of the world or of whom the world i 5 tired!" How can this be said of a young lad that just begins to know what life is? World lings may talk that way. but if they are sensible men they do not condemn a thing the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

W5(SyiBSp?Bj5p5jjj fmmmwWli' H ' i vf.fr "- -" -? The Indian Advocate. 114 make us better Christians, to follow Christ more closely and to reproduce his life here on earth, it is indeed a high and no ble state of life. Now every man of sense readily admits that the higher state of life, is the more a person needs preparation to render himself fit for it. Nobody finds fault with a young man because he prepares himself to be a soldier, a doctor or a lawyer; even ous seminaries where candidates to the priest hood are educated, meet with no objection. Why then should such institutions be condemned where young people are train ed and prepared for religious life? Would it be wise to leave a tender plant, destined by Divine Providence to be one day a beautiful tree in God's garden, exposed to all the dangers of a cold and stormy world? fi Benedict guided by the spirit of God and of all the Saints, did not exclude from "the school where we learn how to serve the Lord" as he defines a Monas ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

r7 y 115 The Indian Advocate. instructed in the duties of religious life, to which they aspire. Happily shielded from most of the temptations which beset the young student in the world, they grow at once in stature, wisdom and grace. At the same time their life is made as free and joyous as possible. They are not overdosed with religion; they are true boys overflowing with fun and as fond of football, baseball and noisy games as any other healthy lads. They serve Mass in the morning, assist at the Conven tional Mass, and on feast days also at Vespers. The rest of the day is divided between study and play. During vacation they may spend a fortnight or so with their parents; but as a general rule they do not go home for the holidays. Their parents are encouraged to come and see them, and now and again they spend a few drys at home so that their vocation may be thoroughly tested. Of course some of them do not .persevere, but a good proportion do, and they make excellent religious. They...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

rw yr ip i 4 -t T--jywprT.w-ii-TpTjmKT mmmmmmmm Thk' Indian Advocate. 116 Happy indeed are these little ones of the cloister, who, after an innocent and joyous boyhood spent in the fear and love of God, offer themselves in the strength of their early manhood to the service of the King of Kings, and receive as their portion the beatitude of those who dwell in the Lord's House, and are forever praising him. Piscator. CHRISTIAN EDUCATION. The question of education is nowadays the theme of great many writers, and the subject of discussion in almost every periodical and daily production of the public mind. It is a question that never attracted so much the attention of the people at large as it does in our times, and yet it is, in every part of the world, an object of contradiction and misunder standing. This is to be regretted, for the question of education is a very delicate one, one that carries with it, in man's religious and social field of activity, the most happy or the most disas ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

117 Tun Indian Advocate. the public mind in the very domain or first principles. The loose skeptscism of latter-day philosophers has denied the existence of any definite and unchangeable truth and the champions of the so-called Reformation, by inaugurating the system of free instruction, have raised contradiction itself to the rank and dignity of principle, so that a thousand and one different sects have been the practical outcome of it. People as a consequence, have come to consider this in tellectual disease as the normal state of the public mind and make of religion a master of mere feeling, dilettantism and even fashion. No wonder then, that in matters of education we should witness the most contradictory and divergent views. We Catholics who realize the necessity of true principles, because we do not build any edifice on the sand, we alone offer to the world the grand spectacle of a united body, we make on every philosophical, religious and social question, a firm and uncomprom...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

T tw'"! "'ig-j'Tvw r-yvsy'Tyapyj-; wEfliy Tiii: Injjian Advocate. 118 to follow the suggestions of his passions. All depends on his will. If his will is directed toward the fulfillment of his duties towards God, towards his neighbor and himself, he is doing right. If on, the contrary, the tide of his passions carries him along the pathway of injustice, vice and immorality, he is doing wrong. Social life standb on public order, and as the unjust, vicious and immoral man is sapping the foundations of public order, the sentiment of self-preservation, to say nothing of the will of God, shows plainly to society its duty to give to the child who will be a man to-morrow, a sound and forceful moral training. Now do not tell me that mere learning is apt to create and develop in the child the sense of duty. For 1 ask you, what relation is there between arithmetic and the virtue of obedience, between philosophy and justice, between spelling and chastity? Says Herbert Spencer: "Are not fraudule...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

r 119 Tiirc Indian Advocate. the tendency to trespass against fellow-creatures? In what way can the accuracy in spelling and parsing, etc., make the sentiment of justice more powerful than it was? or why, from stores of geographical knowledge, perseveringly gained is there likely to come increased regard for truth. Learning, my dear friends, is a weapon. It all depends on how we use it. If used to promote the intellectual and moral advancement of the individual and the community, it is a power for good; if used for an unjust accumulation, of capital, for the oppression of the working people or the the corruption of public conscience, it is an instrument of evil. But it will never have by itself, a direct and positive moralizing effect. Learning will refine but never reform vice. It will conceal crime and will make of a vicious man, both a criminal and ahypocrit. An educated criminal will multiply crime a hundred fold under the shape of scientific process, and will find a thousand wa...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

The Indian Advocate i 20 " IN MEMORIAML God's ways are not ours. In his inscrutable Providence He often disposes of our affairs, in a way the least expected. He gives and takes away as He pleases. Ever blessed be his holy name! We had not as yet recovered from the sad impression caused by the disastrous fire of Jau. 15th, viz: the total destruction of our Institution, when our dear Fr. Sylvester was taken away from us by an untimely and inexorable death. Rev. D. (Bernard) Sylvester Castera was born at Lucq-de-Bearn, Diocese of Bayoune, France, February 15, 1875. His parents being deeply imbued with Christian piety, instilled into the heart of young Bernard the first principles of our holy Religion, preaching to him as much by their example as by their words. From a tender age he showed a great love for study and an ardent desire of be coming a priest, Great was his happiness when his good parents, after his first Communion, yielded to his pious aspirations and allowed him to en ter ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

'ffPftiy''''wwi"i'jir' ""m'P" WW 'a''"t"W"""w vQi.wmvn'ri-i 121 The Indian Advocatk. In recreation he was never heard to make remarks against holy Charity. Nevertheless, his conversation was genial and interesting. He was very punctual to all the regular exercises of the community. He loved silence as a means of advancement in piety and in learning. These virtues were not the momentary effect of the fervor of his Novitiate; he practiced them in a progressive scale, after his holy profession and till his death. His simple profession took place Aug. 22,1864. His Superiors, recognizing in him more than ordinary talents and relying on further usefulness, sent him to St. Benedict's College, Atchison, Kansas, to perfect himself in some special studies, and be fitted to teach in our College of Sacred Heart. His progress was very gratifying; after two years he returned with a Diploma. He then studied Philosophy and Theology. As he was gifted with a serious and thoughtful mind, he ad vanced ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

rr---pTnr i jv"t!'-;v'!Pf""'Jf "t"9H The Indian Advocate. 122 LOCALS, Rev. Fr. Aloysius, O. S. B. is stationed pro tern, at Antlers, Indian Territory. Born to Mr.' and Mrs. August Zoeller, a son. Hail the the new born soldier of Christ. Rev. Fr. Vincent, O. S. B., is assisting Rev. Fr. Crowley, of Denison, Texas, during lenten season. Rev. Fr. Gratian, O. S. B., is acting Rector, of Weather ford, Texas, during the illness if its pastor, Rev. Fr. Burns. The Kiaw Indian reservation has been detached from Pawnee county, and attached to Kay county, for judicial purposes. Rev. Father Hippolyte of Lehigh, I. T., paid us a flying visit, he was accompanied by one of his Alumni, Master Johnny Harley. We are glad to see Rev. Fr. Germanus' health restored again. That he may enjoy it for the remainder of his earthly pilgrimage is the wish of his many friends. D, Maurus officiated for the first time, in his native place, Macon, 111. V. Rev. Prior represented the Communi ty on the solemn occasion...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

123 Thk Indian Advocate. Died, in St. Anthony's Hospital, Oklahoma City, Okla., &ev, Fr. Sylvester Castera, O. S. B., at the age of twenty six years and 20 days. A notice of his short life is published in another part of this issue. R. 1. P. The thanks of the Community are extended to the Rev. Fr. Isadore, and the good sisters of Anadarko, for their charity towards our brethren. May Almighty God reward them a hundred-fold in this world and in the next. March 21 Rt. Rev. Bishop Meerschaert raised R. R. Fathers Stanislaus, Aloysius, Maurusand Timothy to the sublime dig nity of the 'Priesthood; Dom Hilderbrand Zoeller. O. S. B., received the Sub-Deaconship on the same day. According to "Official Report" the Indian Catholic popu lation of the Vicariate of Indian Territory is 3,085. They worship in 15 churches attended by 6 priests; 152 children and 30 adults were baptized last year, and 745 children are in the 12 schools set apart for them. March 17th, St. Gregory's Mission celebrat...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 33 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

, i . l a.I.3., 1 i- ii fiM'MA , ' . The Indian Advocate. 124 community chanted the "Veni Creator." In spite of the pressing circumstances, Rev. F. Aloysius had the good for tune of being able to sing a solemn High Mass, at which he was assssted by Rev. Elias Fink, O. S. B., as Deacon and Dom Hildebrand Zoeller, O. S. B., as Sub-Deacon, the latter having also been elevated to this dignity on the 21st of March. Rev. Adelbert Haffner, O. S. B., gave an eloquent and beautiful sermon, in which he stated that the new priest had chosen this day of sorrow and mourning for his first Mass "because he is a true Monk, whose sworn duty was to follow 'Christ and Him crucified' because he is a son of St. Bene dict, who had such a gteat devotion to the Cross because he is a child of our saintly Father Muard, who willed that his followers be victims of expiation for the sins of the world because he is a Missionary of the Sacred Heart; of that Heart pierced by a Lance, 'how many alas! he exclaimed, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 34 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

125 The Indian Advocate. CALENDAR. 1901. AJPRIL, 1901, 1. Of the Feria, (Ss. Vincent and Anastase Mm) semid. 2. Of the Feria, (St. Francis of Paula C.) semid. 3. Of the Feria, semid. 4. Maunday Thursday. . '. D. ist. cl. 5. Good Friday, D. ist. cl. 6. Holy Saturday, D. ist. cl. 7. Easter Sunday, D. ist. cl. with Oct. 8. Easter Monday, D. ist. cl. 9. Easter Tuesday, D. ist. cl. 10. Of the Octave, , semid. 11. Of the Octave, semid. 12. Of the Octave semid. 13. Of the Octave, (Bl. Ida, V. O. S. B.) semid. 14. Low Sunday, (St. Justin, M. ) D. 15. St. Hermenegild King M semid. 16. St. Turibius, Bp. C. O. S. B.! D. 17. Bl. John de Surdis, Bp. C. O. S. B D. 18. VII Founders of the Order of the Servites, D. 19. St. Leo IX, Pp. C. O. S. B D. 20. St. Adelbert, Bp. M. O. S, B D. 21. Second Sunday after Easter, St. Anselm, Bp. C. D. . .D 22. Ss. Soter and Caius, Pps. Mm semid. 23. St-. George, M, semid. 24. St. Mellitus, Bp. C. O. S. B., D. 25. St. Marc, the Evangelist, D. 2d, cl. 26. Ss. Clet ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

jjMgiMMMttiiiBJiil "-'-- The Indian Advocate Vol. XIII. MAY, 1901. No. 5 TITK INDIANS. JpIS not a century since they, The red men, traversed here, And over these pleasant hills and vales " 1 jrursuea tne Dounamg aeer; , Here, too, that eloquence was poured Around the council light, That made the sturdy warrior bold, And ready for the fight' And oft they came exulting back, The husband, sire and son, To vaunt before their savage shrines The ill their hands had done! Yet, of their mortal weal or woe, No trace is left to-day, For like the foam upon the wae, They all have passed away. Yes, foi the red man dare 1 plead; We bow to Heaven's recorded laws, Jit turned to Nature for a creed. Beneath a pillar'd dome We seek our God in prayer; Through boundless woods loved to roam, And the Great Spirit worshiped there.

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1901

127 The Indian Advocate. AN APPEAL IN HICHAM- Ol"" CATHOLIC MISSION SCHOOLS, At this moment a perplexing problem confronts the Pre lates of the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions. The oldest and most highly cherished missionary enterprise in the coun try is threatened with destruction we refer to the Catholic Indian schools, which have ever been the chief factor in Christianizing and.civilizing the North American Indian. In the past these schools were supported with money ap propriated by the United States Government, and were known as contract schools. In 1895 there were 3,000 Indian boys and girls in our contract schools. For these 3,000 children the Government appropriated 359,215, in consideration of which the boarding schools were, in the language of the agreement with the Com missioner of Indian Affairs, -to care for and educate" their pupils; to supply them with "suitable and sufficient clothing, subsistence, lodging accommodations, medical attendance, school books, stationer...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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