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Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 1,232 items from Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 8 November 1893

9 THEYJALAIHTY HOWL. Ia There Any Ground Tor It On the Part of the Farmer and Producer? Editor Advocate : Many candid and intelligent people, especially in the cities and towns, are constantly inquiring what's the matter with the farmers and of what are they complaining bo griev ously everywhere? And many others who don't read or who are so intensely bound up by party prejudice that read- ' ing don't take effect, and therefore does them no good, join in the inquiry as to what all this raoket is about, and affect to regard it as a mere calamity howl without sense or reason. Let us try to enlighten these several inquirers. As I have perhaps said before in the A dvo cats, in 1867 or 1868 a friend and neigh bor of mine in Douglass county took a four -horse load of wheat, fifty bushels, to market and received for it $2.05 a bushel, or $102.50, with whioh he went in to the street and after paying $20 taxes and $10 interest, proceeded to lay in his winter supplies, patronizing eight or ten...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 8 November 1893

10 THE ADVOOAVR A VEST MODEST SUGGrESTIQir. The New York Capitalist claims to be a "record of finance and invest ment," and is ssid to be "devoted to all large 'interests from a financial standpoint." The reader will not doubt the sincerity of these claims after reading the following from the May issue of 1893. If this isn't "de voted to a large interest from a finan cial standpoint," we do not know what is: A tewepaper, like the Capitalist, feels that Its duty is to esohew polities, as much as possible, except when any measure in the state or fedfral legislature, threatens to affect prejudicially the interests of the bank ing community, of whose well-being, and continued prosperity, the Capitalist is the recognized oonsemtor; but the Capitalist can cot avoid having opinion?, whioh oooa sionally conflict with those of the majority, and whioh it believes to rest on a sound foundation of equity and common sense. A careful perusal of the thirteenth annual re port of the Union Paoiflo R...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 8 November 1893

THE ADVOCATE, 11 MODEM PIEATE3. How They Differ Prom Those Who " Sailed the Boiling Seas." It ia seldom that the Advocate in dulges in poetry, bat the following which is credited to Harper's Weekly seems bo appropriate to the times that we are con strained to give it a place. Editor J In the days of old The pirate bold Clung to the rolling seas. St..,-" On the vast expanse Where the billows dance r-T, lie felt him most at his ease. When he scuttled a boat Or cut a throat 'Twas quite convenient then To be up in the "Roaring Forties" Or down on the Spanish Main. At least it was so in the days of old. When rogues were timid and honest men bold. Or if ever to land A pirate band To pillage and plunder came If to ransack a town Or to burn it down The devil had made It their game They'd at least hide away UnJl close of day With their rakish craft in the still lagoon Sheltered from view by a tropical growth, Lite a Dira or prey 'neatn a southern moon But. that was all in the days of old. Wh...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 8 November 1893

12 TECHS advocate. THEY II EVES SLEEP. (Continued Jrom page 1.) bribery and corruption will vanish bfore them." The paper was signed by the following: Senators W. A. Peffer, John P. Jones, William M. Stewart, James IT Kyi a and William V. Allen; Representatives John Davis, William Baker, II. E. Boen, J. C. Bell, W. A. Harris, T. J. Hudson, Lafe Fence, Jerry Simpson, C). M. Kern and W. A. McKeighan. Some History. The Ottawa Republican of October 21, published this paragraph: Remember that it was the Populist senate that defeated the Greenlee railroad bill last winter. It passed the republican house but was defeated in the senate because it pro vided for the election of railroad commis sioners by the people. The statement that the senate de feated the railroad bill because it pro vided for the election of the commission ers by the people, is false in every particular, as the journals of the senate and "Douglass" honss will show. House bill 119, an act relating to rail roads was introd...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 8 November 1893

13 Sensa and Nonseaso, Nobody suppoeee for a minute that a proclamation by a president or governor has any effect towards creating feelings of thankfulness in the breasts of the common herd. Tet in these days of stereotyped forms and methods the form of issuing thanksgiving proclamations is repeated with great regularity, and it is refreshing to see an executive official depart from the usual form and inject a little practical sense into such a docu ment, as a suggestion to the people and an all-wise Providence. Here is the latest from the official pen of President Cleveland, issued Novem ber!: A Proclamation : While the American people should every day remember with praise and thanksgiving the divine good ness and mercy which have followed them einoe their beginning as a nation, it is fit ting that one day in each year should be especially devoted to the contemplation of the blessings we have received from the hand of Ood and to the grateful acknowl edgement of His loving kindness....

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 8 November 1893

14 THE ADVOCATE. The Situation in Indiana. Editor Advocate: Farmers of Indi ana have had droughts to cut ehort their com, potatoes, pastures and other crops. Their wheat, ool and all live stock, hogs excepted, are lower than for many years past. Almost everything is down except interest, taxes, salaries and money. Merchants have failed. Others would gladly sell at cost, and others are trying to sell for less than cost, to meet their liabilities. There is general distrust and fear of the future. Financiers and bank ers say prospects are brighter, money easier and times better. It may be so for their business, but not to common people. The farmer, mechanic and la borer see nothing in congressional pro ceedings to encourage. The first measure proposed by the finance committee was to help national banks give them 10 per cent, more pa per money for nothing, and remove the 1 per cent, tax on their circulation. DoubtleBB this measure for the relief of the people will find cordial support w...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 8 November 1893

15 hffA ITMESS FROM any CAUSE M Lm 4 I Head Noises cured by the use of the Mioro-Audiphones. Send for Descriptive Hook, HUE toSU nO-llUlfaONliCO., I-JIS aawnlcT.Bplf.lhlcago. HAS NO Superior ft Winger's Royal Crown i Ni STEEL WIND MILL. -51 U 4 5 J. C. ILlcCLINTOCK, A.M., M.D., oxmanoN. 330 Einiu Avenue, - Topeka, Kansas Office hours, 3 to 4 p. m. U- 3 S 1 a! '. : a 0 jSPAVIM CUREi GRAY HAIR OR WHISKERS nnfiiral rvilnr hv imlncr TAN'S m..vTfi . v mil) IUVTOIIlTIl P It m. moves all dundrurT, stops hair from falling out and cures all disease of the scalp. It is no Dye, and I s war ranted absolutely harmless. Money refundedlfltdoea Dot doevery thing claimed forlt Sentto any address on :ceiptof pne, tl.OOperbottl.. Full information fre.. igonta rantad. IlXKS A CO 812 tutor Ocean Buildint, Chicao, 111. Dm Fact Hotel JNO. F. CARTER, Lessee. Coolest house In the city. Large rooms, well ventilated. Terms reasonable. Beautiful parks front and rear. TOrH3IZA i RELIABLE And Brooder Combined. I...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 8 November 1893

10 T.EGZ3 POLAND-CHINA PIG3 AND SHORT horns, bred by J. TL Taylor, Pearl Kaa KAH3AS BONDS WANTED - Highest price paid for refunding or school bonds. Topeka, Ku ( COk Agent's profltsper month. Will JmJ prove it or pay forfeit. New arti- ciesjusi out. a loo sample ana terms wee. Try as. jniaester & Hon, 23 Bond St., n. Y. FRANK HERALD, ATTORNEY AT IaAW. 410 Kansas Aye., Topeka Kan. 1 fal. Tk. ..I, KLIXIR a II.0UI item 4uL MUSTACHE Ann CAHO ..iiiur.TZr luiS urrn.r,i.uu iim rMM i. mahtrmum, HiMpIv tmi f Ih. pf.t.ff. ..4 ,kt.f timlta Jirg. l.,PlallBr, Ilk Relieved In Three Minutes. .Permanently Cured In Ten da vs. Jiv mall 0 vent. . I). i-KAXSCIS, 63 Carew Building, Cincinnati, Ohio Gllt-edga Feferencea. We make a sue- clalty of DRESS MAKING AND MILLINERY for our out-of- town friends at very low prices. MRS. V7. C SLY, 837 Kansas Avenue, North Topeka. When writing advertisers mention Advocate Ires snug Consign Your GRAIN To EloffattS Lee Commission Co. Kansas City, Ho. Top Prices. Go...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 15 November 1893

Yiibf And This Time Democracy Gets a Slap In the Face. POPULISTS MAKE GREAT GAINS While the Eepublicans Sweep Ohio, New York, Massachusetts and Iowa Nebraska Olose Kansas and Colorado Elections. The election returns from the eastern states are a source of great consolation to the republicans. They have carried Ohio and New York by overwhelming majorities and safely elected their tick ets in Massachusetts and Iowa. They elected a majority of the legislature in New Jersey and a supreme court judge in Nebraska. , The Populists carried a majority of the counties in Colorado and have made wonderful gains in Nebraska, Iowa and Virginia. In the latter state, where no active campaign has been made until this year, reports say the Populists have carried from twelve to twenty counties. This change still leaves the democrats over 30,000 majority. The county and judicial elections in Kansas did not result in a viotoryfor anybody except the successful candi dates who are to nil the different off...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 15 November 1893

2 THIS JUD'yoo.Tss: EAUEOAD TAXATION. The Present Board of Assessors Explains Its Action and Makes Some Suggestions. The board of railroad assessors, con sisting of the lieutenant governor, state auditor, treasurer, attorney general and secretary of state, completed their work some time ago, and made their returns to the county officers in time for the latter to make their tax levies on railroad property. The report of their proceed ings, however, which includes reports of the hearings given to tax commissioners, attorneys and other representatives of the different companies, is just being is sued by the state printer. In it the board gives its reasons for raising the Fggregbte valuation some $11,000,0Q0, to gether with other information, from which the following is taken: "The larger part of the time at the "hearings" was davoted to the general question of assessment and taxation, to the relative value of different kinds of property, and but little to the minor de tails or to local...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 15 November 1893

'jC'JKCB advooats. 3 AOTGOLD ADDEE3S. History of. the Great Monetary Battle in a Nut Shell. To the People of the United States: ' The conflict of the money powers bat tling for a gold oligarchy and the masses struggling for constitutional liberty is momentous and irrenressibla War and enterprise anticipated future production for the preservation of our government and the development of our resources. The world's accumulations of gold and silver formed the basis of the money volume available to pay time contracts, The aggregate debts of the world ex ceeded $100,000,000,000. Less than $3,000,- 000,000 of gold and silver constituted the available fund for the ultimate payment of debts. These enormous obligations might have been discharged without the destruction of industries if the available coin for the final payment, with its an nual increase from the mines, had re mained undiminished. The arts require an amount of gold nearly, if not quite, equal to the entire present output of the...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 15 November 1893

.4 THIS AND TOPEKA TRIBUNE. OFFICIAL STATE PAPER. N. P. JL. PUBLI8HXD BVKBI WlDNMDAT BY THE ADVOCATE PUBLISHES COMPANY, Booms 43 and 45 Knox Bulldog, topkka. . . - KANSAS. $1.00 PEB YEAR. ADVERTISING BATES. For single insertion : Display matter, 20 cents per line, 14 lines to the inch. Keadlng notices, 40 rents per line. Discount for long-time ood- tncts. ) Ind. I Ind. Rural Press Assoo'n, Chlcaao Office P. O. VanVlmt, Mgr. ) Boyee Building. Entered at the postofflce at Tnpeka, Kansas, as second ciass m&ner. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15. 1893. CHE The campaign of 1893 closed No vember 7. That of 1894 began No vember 8. Now is the time to cwry on the work of education, and the Advocate is the best educator extant. Advocate readers are not only well informed, bufthey turn out and vote on election day. Don't forget this when looking for literature for the campaign now on. Habd luok makes liars, thieves and even anarchists out of men. Peter Barker, of Kansas City, is a case in point. lie ...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 15 November 1893

THIS ADVOCATE!. 5 made the greatest per cent cf gain. The republican vote in the city o Topeka in 1890 was 3,359. In 1891 it was 2,460. In 1892 it was 4361. In 1893 it is 2,585. The republican tota vote in Shawnee county in 1890 was 5,073. In 1891 it was 4,244. In 1892 it was 6,750. In 1893 it is 4,391. The Populist vote in the city m 1890 was 248. In 1891 it was 267. In In 1892 we cannot tell what it was because the democrats voted with us at that election. In 1893 it is 622. The Populist vote outside of Topeka in 1890 was 1,007. In 1891 it was 1,019. In 1892 ' it was combined, as in the city, with the democratic vote and we cannot tell what it was. In 1893 it is 759. This shows tnat the Populist loss in this, as in other coun ties, i in the country precincts, and the republican vote which was 1,784 in 1891, 2.396 in 1892 and 1,806 in 1893 in these same precincts, has not been reinforced by the Populist votes which were not cast for the Populist ticket this year. The farmers have s...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 15 November 1893

6 TS-IEI ADVOCATE T7HITHEB ABE WE TEEOTMG? The New York Herald is responsi ble for the statement that the mil lionaires of Fifth avenue, New York, have had a force of 500 extra police men assigned to that aristocratic street to guard their persons and property. These policemen are said to have instructions not to makear rests, but to shoot down any suspi cious characters found trespassing upon this sacred thoroughfare. The president of the United States and heads of departments at the cap- tal of the nation have special police men assigned for the protection of their persons; and the same is said to be true of certain senators and repre eentatives in congress. Train robberies have become so common that many railroad compan ies have found it necessary to place armed guards upon their trains to protect passengers and property; and these precautions are not always ef fectual. Bobberies of banks and bus iness houses are on the increase, and a spirit of reckless lawlessness seems to be e...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 15 November 1893

TBCE ADVOOATB. 7 TRYING TO REVIVE THE OLD PB AUD. As has been repeatedly shown, there is nothing that a republican or a democratio politician or newspaper editor so abhors as a real living po litical issue. The campaign of 1893 is past, and, knowing that the next campaign is bound to begin where the former one left off, the next effort of the old twins will be directed to the task of finding something to kick up a dust over besides the questions of money, land and transportation. The Kansas City Journal of Novem ber 1 copies from the Pittsburg (Pa.) Tim es of ' October 16 a list of fifteen manufacturing firms in that city which one year ago employed 25,000 hands on full wages and full time. Now they employ 10,000 hands on part time; and the testimony of these firms is introduced to show the rea son of all this misfortune. Here it is: Jones & Laughlin Are doing from 50 to GO per oent. of the business of a year ago; there has been some reduction in wages. Cause asoribed f ear of t...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 15 November 1893

0 ANOTHEB WAVE. (Continued from page 1.) Kent, Campbell, Caroline, Prince George, Greenville, Powhattan, Prince Edward, Sussex, Thomas and Fioyd gave majorities for Cocke and Beverly, Populist candidates for governor and lieutenant governor. C. T. O'Ferrell demoorat is elected governor. The dem ocrats did not pole their usual strength although in many localities the republi cans voted with them solidly. A ma joritv of both houses of the legislature will be democratic. IOWA. The election throughout the state of Iowa shows a Populist gain and a falling off in both the republican and demo cratic votes. The first returns received at Das Moines make a decidedly good showing. Taking them juat as they come, without making any selections, the Farmer's Tribune finds them as follows "Fifteen precincts give the Populists a net gain of 129, the republicans net loss of 237, the democrats net loss 200, compared with vote of 1802 in same pre cincts. "Fifty-three precincts, including twenty-two in ...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 15 November 1893

i-JSID ADVOCATE. 9 Clemens' View of It. "Against whom do ye sport yourselves? against whom make ye a wide mouth, and draw out the tongue? Are ye not the chil dren of transgression, a seed of falsehood? -Isaiah." Amidst the tumult of republican re joicings, one Populiat, at least, has been serene. I have read history too much, and too seriously have conned its les sons, to be disturbed by the ephemeral triumphs of iniquity. In his "History of Our Own Times," Justin McCarthy tells of the speedy discomfiture of a cer tain Englishman who, at a "jollification" gloried that Chartism was dead. Bis marck long ago announced to the de lighted bargeois of Germany that social ism had been "stamped out;" yet even while he still lives its success bids fair to make infamous the deeds he had ex pected would give him immortal fame. The very Boston streets through which a mob followed Wendell Phillips to his home in I860 for praising John Brown, trembled in 1861 with the tread of north ern soldiers s...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 15 November 1893

10 THE ADVOCATE, FOESEES A CONFLICT Ber. Thomas Dixon Talks of the Discon tent Among the Laboring MassesDu ties of the Ohnrch. In a sermon delivered in New York, October 22, Rev. Thomas Dixon took as hia subject "The Coming Revolution " He declared that the issue at stake for conservatism in the approach ing conflict were nothing less that the existence of the present economic sys tem, the idea of caste in the social order and the foundations which make it pos sible, the existence of the present gov erning political powers as well as the existence of the church itself. On the part of radicalism, he declared the is sues believed by millions to be involved were nothing less than the right to life and work, liberty, individualism, a tol erable human existence and justice in the distribution of the world's economic goods. The text chosen was from Matthow xxiv,7, "For nation shall rise against na tion and kingdom against kingdom." ; The history of the past centuries has given us the fulf...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 15 November 1893

THE ADVOCATE, 11 til finally he drove him almost a pauper from the estate and from the neighbor hood. He kept telling his friends that some day he would get what was dae him from the Bulwer-Lytton estate. When Owen Meredith came to the title and was home on leave of absence as English embassador to France, this laborer met him on the road one day. "You are Lord Lytton, I believe," he said respectfully. "Yes." "Then, if you please, I should like you to pay an account which has been due me for a long time." Lord Lytton looked at the account, and at his request the man told the whole story. The poet was very much affected and disturbed. Then he said: "Well, I will do what I can to make it up to you." He was as good as his word. He built a house at the gates of the park, put the man and his family into it and gave it to them, rent free, with other perquisites, so that he was entirely comfortable for the remainder of his days. DUTY OF THE EICH. If out powerful classes of today would only...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 15 November 1893

12 Published November 15, 1893. in Court Svlii 9169. The State of Kansas vs. A. W. Patterson. Appeal from Cowley County. AFFIRMED. yllabus. By the Court. Hoeton.C. J. L.The case of the State vs. Cassady, 12 Kas. 550 followed: 8. The case of State vs. Mosley, 31 Kas 8i referred to and commented upon. 8. Under the statutes of this state, one who Jirocures counsels or commands a criminal of ense may be considered as principal, and may be punished as the principal, and it is not nec essary to name such principal in the informa tion or indictment. ... 4. As an accessory before the fact may be charged, tried and convicted in the same man ner as if he were principal, it necessarily fol lows that he may be convicted of that degree of the crime, which the evidence against him establishes, and the fact that the principal through failure or proof or caprice of the Jury, has been convicted of a lower grade, or even acquitted, cannot affect the question of his guilt or innocence. State vs. Bogue...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
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