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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1993

September/October 1993 Candidates answer farm-related Questions (Continued from Page 2) Mary Sue Terry—Many Virginians don't have adequate access to health care because of where they live. Fifty-two of the state's 136 cities and counties —most of them rural communities —have no physicians. I will target recruitment and provide incentives for health care providers who serve communities in need I will also work with the state's three medical schools to increase the supply of primary-care physicians in underserved areas. My administration will also push for increases in the numbers of nurse practitioners and physicians' assistants in underserved areas. Our strategies will include recruiting medical students from rural communities, providing learning experiences to encourage students in the health care professions to choose primary care specialties, and providing enhanced primary care graduate training within the state. 5. What are your views on land use assessment? George Allen—Land us...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1993

Ijjjj^l^ JoeThorenton, a produce ,w ■■■^^- ;; M , : * salesman at the Southwest fVmT Uf'r # * Virginia Farmers' Market in [ -* ,■ ■ I Hitlsville, shares a fresh I wnß mt 1 f p Virginia peach with Larry B C Home and his wife Becky £ SH saw the sign for the market Hp m - on interstate 77. They yjt, * ISST stopped and bought some B mjk peaches and tomatoes. ■ e I P "* !|| n| ■ ' (See related stories, KATHY DIXONIFBN P®9®® 1 flfXl 9) Gubernatorial debate 2 Clean water hearing 3 Convention 7-10 New name 13 Gubernatorial candidates, Farmers, lobbyists and This marks the 68th year of One of Virginia Farm Mary Sue Terry and George environmentalists tell Sen. Virginia Farm Bureau Bureau's insurance compaAllen, answer questions John Warner, R-Va., what Federation's Annual nies has changed its name, relating to agriculture and they envision in an amended Convention. Read all about Find out what Early Settlers farm policy. Clean Water Act. it in this special section. is now called ► A full rang...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1993

Farm Bureau Vol 52, No. 9 Farmers keeping close eye on USDA office closings By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor WASHINGTON — U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy told the Senate Agriculture Committee Oct 6 he still plans to close or consolidate some 1,300 USDA county offices, many of them in Virginia. While not objecting to the need to streamline the USDA, Sen. David L. Boren, D-Okla., warned Espy he would work to stall any county office closings until more details were released on plans to streamline the Washington bureaucracy. Boren also pressed Espy to cull more than 800 home office jobs the secretary had promised to eliminate. Farmers are keeping a close eye. "Farmers are justifiably concerned that they could end up with a lower quality of service, greater inconvenience and less responsiveness from agencies that provide valuable programs and regulate farming practices," testified Hany Pearson, president of the Indiana Farm Bureau. Many of those changes require congressional ap...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1993

2 Washington judge hands down curious decision on Ist Amendment Since the early 1600s, Virginia apples have played a major role in the state's storied past. For example, in 1622, settlers grafted Virginia crab apple rootstocks with imported wood sent by the London Company, thus successfully creating Virginia's first orchards. In 1639, a Royal Order required landowners with a patent for 100 or more acres of land to establish a garden and an orchard. Throughout the early years, prominent Virginia leaders continued to develop the tasty, healthy fruit. Virginia Gov. William Berkeley once planted 1,500 apple trees on his farm in Charles City County. George Washington's lease agreement required tenants to maintain a four-acre orchard. And Thomas U.S. food practically disaster-proof It is hard to imagine any worse calamity for American agriculture FARM FOCUS American Farm Bureau Federation in the Southeast watched their crops shrivel up, Midwest farmers saw their crops turn to seaweed. Far...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1993

November 1993 State's grain corn acreage cut in half over last 15 years By GREG HICKS VFBF Communications Director RICHMOND—Much like the summer drought 0f1993, the Old Dominion's oncelucrative corn crop is rapidly shriveling on the stalk. Virginia's grain corn acreage, concentrated primarily in the state's eastern region and in the Shenandoah Valley, has been declining at an alarming rate since the mid-19705, with no relief in sight. And one of the state's leading agricultural economists says for all intents and purposes, "We have ... gone out of the corn business in this state." Speaking to farm leaders during the Virginia Agricultural Economic Summit Oct. 6, Dr. Wayne Purcell, professor of agriculture and applied economics at Virginia Tech, said corn for grain had plummeted from 600,000 planted acres in 1977 to less than 350,000 acres in 1992. Purcell cited four reasons for the decline. First, he said, the periodic summer droughts in Virginia make yields highly unstable. "We got ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1993

4 Oxygenated fuels now required in Northern Virginia RlCHMOND—Measures requiring the sale of oxygenated fuels in Northern Virginia have been approved by the Virginia Board of Apiculture and Consumer Services. The oxygenated fuel regulations will be in effect from November through February and will cover the counties of Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, Prince William and Stafford, and Alexandria, Fairfax, Falls Church, Manassas and Manassas Park. These regulations replace the emergency rules thatwent into eflfect last year when the oxygenated fuels were required in the Northern Vuginia area for the first time. They are required because the carbon monoxide levels in Northern Virginia and Washington, D.C. exceed those approved by the Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA. The fuel program is considered integral in cutting carbon monoxide levels because stagnant air currents and cloud cover hold in carbon monoxide emissions from automobile exhaust during the winter months. Oxygenated fuel...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1993

November 1993 Combined service of board candidates totals almost 40 years RICHMOND—The five Virginia Farm Bureau Federation board members up for re-election this year have almost 40 years combined service on the board. Raymond R. Kite, who represents District 7, has served almost 17 years on the board. Gordon R Metz Jr., the District 4 director, and J.P. Davis Jr., who represents District 10, each have seven years board experience. District 1 Director E. Dick Odle has more than five years on the board; and Marvin L. Everett, the director for District 13, has served on the board for three years. At press time, the five incumbents were running unopposed. On Dec. 2, approximately 275 voting delegates to VFBF's 68th Annual Convention will elect board members from Districts 1,4, 7,10 and 13 to serve three-year terms. The following are brief backgrounds on the current directors: DISTRICT 1 E. Dick Odle, a Scott County beef cattleman and burley tobacco grower, serves the VFBF Burley Tobacc...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1993

6 DOOGE JUST CAME UP WITH 500 MORE REASONS FOR BELONGHG TO TOUR BUttftBUREAU. . ......... .. 's''m V'^Hbk \$W tflß ~J ^^i^^^j|Bl»|ifli]jiPßl||^^lßPjHjj|H|B^KK>»^^ FARM BUREAU NEWS November 1993

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1993

November 1993 Reducing minor-use crop pesticides will lower yields, increase costs PARK RIDGE, 111.—A 50-percent reduction in pesticide availability for socalled "minor crops" would mean lower yields, higher costs and significantly smaller consumer supplies of many fruits and vegetables grown in the United States, according to a study recently released by the American Farm Bureau Research Foundation. The study, "Economic Impacts of Reduced Pesticide Use on Fruits and Vegetables," quantified the supply, availability and cost consequences of reduced pesticide use on U.S. fruit and vegetable crops. The research was prompted by growing producer concerns over the loss of key chemicals because of the high cost of developing supporting health and safety data for governmental approval. The nine crops analyzed include potatoes, oranges, tomatoes, grapes, apples, lettuce, onions, sweet corn and peaches. The study focused on states that account for almost 50 percent of total U.S. production of...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1993

8 Cooling system one of many unique aspects of new Farm Bureau building Several state-of-the-art features used in construction of Goochland County facility By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor RlCHMOND—Virginia Farm Bureau's new corporate headquarters at West Creek will beat the summer heat each season by ordering air conditioning on the rocks. The new facility in Goochland County will be cooled with a unique, energy-effi-cient system that circulates air across chilled water from a dozen ice-filled tanks throughout the 130,000-square-foot building. The Ice Thermal Storage System does most of its work during off-peak energy hours—lo p.m. to 10 a.m., according to Tim Bogardus, a partner in Lanna, Dunlap, and Spriggs PC, which installed the ice system. Each of 12 storage tanks in the basement of the West Creek building contains a rolled up mat inside which are tubes filled with a glycol solution. The mats — the same kind used in ice skating rinks— are surrounded by water. During the ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1993

November 1993 Ag tour teaches aides about g By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor Government mandates may one day cost farmers their livelihoods. And the only way that will change is if lawmakers become agriculturally literate. To help educate politicians, the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation took congressional agriculture aides from Virginia on an intense, two-day tour of farms across the state. During the Legislative Aides Tour, five aides were able to increase their understanding of agriculture and the problems plaguing farmers. At the same time, they were able to sample some agricultural products that may be in jeopardy. At Brickrow Farm in Westmoreland County, Woody Hynson Jr. served the aides fresh watermelon and cantaloupe slices, and they took Hynson's plea to save the family farm seriously. "I need your help," Hynson said. "Before any legislation is passed, it's got to be weighed. If it costs the farmer money, let it go. "You can call me and get an old country version, but ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1993

10 Future looks bright for Agin the Classroom By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor and SHERRY SHUYLER VFBF Intern RICHMOND —Virginia's Agriculture in the Classroom program is poised to takeoff. With a new full-time ATTC coordinator, a tax-free foundation and a new sixthgrade curriculum, the future looks bright to educate youngsters about agriculture. That's good news, said Dr. Clinton Turner, Virginia Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer Services, because recent generations of Virginians have lost touch with their farm roots. "We've got to get the kids and their parents to understand that agriculture is extremely important" to Virginia's economy and national security, Turner told an audience at the annual Ag in the Classroom Awareness Day Aug. 10. Since today's children will be tomorrow's decision-makers, Turner said they need to understand how a successful agriculture industry is the foundation of our nation's wealth. A stable food supply is almost as important as a strong milita...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1993

November 1993 Women making progress raising funds for Ag in the Classroom Foundation It's been almost two years since the Agriculture in the Classroom Foundation was formed, and we're making progress. We have raised more than $58,000 since we began soliciting donations on behalf ofthe foundation in December 1991. The foundation's purpose is to raise money for Virginia's Agriculture in the Classroom program, which educates America's youth about agriculture. And members of our Virginia Farm Bureau Federation women's committees are constantly sponsoring events and projects to raise money for the cause. The Northern District women raised $400 this year with an auction at their district workshop. This was the second year the auction has been held. And, for the first time, the Midwest District women held an auction at their meeting and managed to raise $382. At this year's VFBF Annual Convention in Roanoke Nov. 29-Dec. 2, USDA closings closely watched by farmers (Continued from Page 1) Pa...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1993

12 Sometimes You Find The Answer a In The Strangest f Places! Who would ever think of looking in a / V Farm Bureau office for the answer to ( their health insurance needs? f ( $1,700 \z' /~ I Savings )T Mrs. V.S..of Russell County, Va. did — and she found the answer: 3 "I saved over $1,700 in annual premiums■ . . So did more than 25,000 Virginians — and they found the answers to their health insurance problems. We know the average American is finding it tough to find adequate health insurance and to pay his medical bills. That's why the VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU has teamed up with BLUE CROSS and BLUE SHIELD OF VIRGINIA to offer several health insurance programs designed to fit your needs. SO CHECK US OUT IF YOUR PROBLEM IS OR IF YOU WANT • I don't have health insurance • Wide range of coverage in and • Insurance costs too much out of the hospital • Insurance I have doesn't give • Savings on your health insurance me good coverage • Prescription drug coverage • Doctor and hospital bills ar...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1993

November 1993 Convention to cover a wide variety of topics, both agricultural and political (Continued from Page 1) Jr., a Virginia Tech Extension animal scientist and project leader, will then talk about 'livestock Production Into the 21st Century." The second session will wrap up with Dr. Harry L. Haney Jr., a Virginia Tech forestry professor and Extension specialist. He will give his viewpoints on "Management Practices to Maximize Income on Timberlands." Prior to the commodity conferences, former U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan will give Farm Bureau members and guests the "inside scoop" on the U.S. Department of Agriculture and its food safety inspection program. Madigan is the keynote speaker for the convention's opening day luncheon Nov. 29. In his address, "Safer Food, More Regs and Less Budget," Madigan will talk about what's currently being done by the government to ensure a safe food supply and what's planned for the future. Microbiologic inspection is one new ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1993

14 THE FARMERS MARKET A Free Service to Members Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $4.50 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge (15 words). member must pay TOTAL number of words Single letters or figures and groups of figures in ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) t Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. CLASSIFIED ADS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. > Deadline: Ads must be received by the 15th of each month prior to the month of publication. For the combined Sept./ Oct. issue, the deadline is Aug. 15. For the Dec./ Jan. issue, the deadline is Nov. 15. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadlin...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1993

November 1993 Non-profit organization seeks donations, deer BIG ISLAND — At a time when Virginia is overpopulated with deer, and hunters are eager to donate kills to feed the hungry, it is ironic that a program to do just that is short on cash 'Those deer havetobe skinned, they have to be cut up, wrapped, frozen and then transported to that distribute it to the needy," explained David Home, director of the Hunters for the Hungry Program. Even though meat processors perfcmi this service at a discount* costs are stall high, Home said. Based on funds raised to date, he expects Hunters for the Hungry will forward about9o,ooopounds of donated venison. If more funding was available, Home estimated that Virginia hunters could easily donate 125,000 pounds of deer meat "We're appealing as strongly as we can to individuals, smaller donors, small businesses, hunt clubs, hunting related organizations to generate revenue," he said "Ifevery deer hunter in Virginia just gave $10, it would be enoug...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1993

Vol 52, No. 9 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA'S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS November 1993 HP , «, '. BPH :^H^K KATHYDIXON/FBN Lessons to be learned Aides to Virginia's congressional delegation, along with Virginia Farm Bureau staff, listen as Essex County farmer Bill Taliaferro (far right) explains how environmental regulations affected the creation of his farm pond. Taliaferro's diverse operation was part of a two-day agricultural tour on the Northern Neck that brought big-city lawmakers in closer touch with the realities of the farm. (Details, see Page 9.) Three C's 1 Shriveling ears 3 West Creek 8 Big catch 10 Cloggers, commodities and Virginia's grain corn Farm Bureau's new corporate Find out what's new with comedians are just three of acreage has been shrinking office comes complete with a the state's aquaculture many Virginia Farm for years and there is no stateof-the-art cooling system industry. Bureau Federation Annual relief in sight. and other unique features. Convention highlights. ► A ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1993

a- . ' Vol 52, No. 10 Mechanization is one key to successful tobacco production By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor Three of Virginia's top tobacco growers say mechanization and diversification are the keys to successful tobacco production in an industry fraught with unknowns. "I can't predict the future, but I think tobacco farming will stick around," said Lunenburg County flue-cured tobacco farmer Mark L. Palmer. If a former diversifies, he can make it." Palmer, who owns a 95-acre farm and leases land on three others, recently purchased 20 head of beef cattle to supplement his tobacco income. J. "Timmy" Ferrell, who grows more than 10,000 pounds of flue-cured tobacco, believes mechanization is the key to successful tobacco production. "Between taxes and the EPA, if s tough going," said the Charlotte County farmer. "So we're trying to cut our high labor costs by putting a harvester into play." And WA "Wally" Roberts, who grows 40,000 pounds of flue-cured tobacco in Brunswick Cou...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1993

2 More agricultural funding tops Farm Bureau legislative agenda Despite impending changes in the makeup of the 1994 General Assembly, Farm Bureau's basic agenda remains the same: To represent farmers from all corners of the state, and to make their wants and needs known to those who represent them. This year's Farm Bureau legislative pri- ority package includes requests for more funding of agricultural programs and highways, better protection of private property rights, preservation of the important land use taxation program, and improvements to the rural health care situation. The 1994 list also includes our views on workers' compensation, livestock permits, tobacco taxes and cost-share funding for environmental mandates. Here are our priority issues for the 1994 Virginia General Assembly: Ag program funding Since fiscal 1989, Virginia agricultural programs have lost millions of dollars in budgetary cuts, resulting in the loss of hundreds of agricultural specialists in instruction,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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