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Elephind.com contains 15,083 items from Preston Leader, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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WASTED YEARS OR JULIA'S DISCOVERY. I. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 2 May 1914

WASTED YEARS OR JULIA'S DISCOVERY. "Confusion worse con founded" had reigned all day in the handsome estab lishment of Mr. Clavering. Upholster ors had been busy removing furniture anld arranging ornaments; gardeners were boearing in exotic plants and towering pyramids of flowors; confec tionors, French cooks, bakers, vint ners had, in their turn, haunted the precincts; and now, at right in tile evening, there was a general lull, broken only by the exclamations of the troop of worthies wllho were tumbl ing over eacll other in their zeal to give the last finish to the arrange montMs or a splendid entortainment. With an aching hload and limbs "both weary and worn," the mistress of the house was busied witll her hasty toilet, while her daughter, the beautiful Grace C'lavering, for whose especial advantage all this tronble and expenso had been incurred, having complleted hers, had thrown herself, perfectly exhausted, into an armehair before her boudoir lire. "Hall, queen of this fairy r...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Quite Enough. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 2 May 1914

Quite Enough. Mr. Irvin S. Cobb, the American writer of short stories, returning from a trip in the Western States, found that a close friend of his had fliell into the hands of the law. lie hurit'ed down to the friend's lawyers. "Why, Jack is the dearest, kindesl, most honest man in the world!" he said. "You must call me as ic wit neos to his character." "Not while I'm his lawyer," wcas the reply. "I know just what would Iap. pen. The other man's lawyer would ask your occupation. And you would say, 'I'm a writer of fiction.' And tile lawyer would get up and stand over you and look into the dark recesses of your heart for a time. And by and by, despairing of finding one1 sweet, aspiring thoughlt in you, h' would turn to the jury. And ihe would exchange an intelligent, libellou?i smile wth the twelve, Anid thin'l ht' would sit down, tll I, without e'veln trotibling to look in your dhirectlii, lie would say, 'Tlht is quite enough, Mr. Cobb. You mnay stand down.' "Now, Chatrles, let us...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"One for the General." [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 2 May 1914

"One for the General." A few years, ago, at a ('olonial sta tion, a very pompous general was mak iug his annual inspection of a famous Irish regiment; now, although he bore a great reputation as a martinet, heI had soon no active service, and was one of those who judged a soldier'a worth by his conduct sheet. There was serving in tihe reginmenlt one Patrick O'l)oherty, who hadl beeni through three arduous canpaigns, and who was the proud possessor of five war medals, lnchlidllig one for "dis tinguilsied conduct on the field." Uni fortunately for Patrick tie pipIng times of peace had reigned for six years, and, owing to hli weakness for strong drink 'and the allurenuenti of the pretty girls in the garrison town, he was constantly in trouble, and only that morning had been dleolrived of his last good colnduct badge, on tlh usual charge of "driunik land out of bounds." As the gelneral passed down thi' ranks he was attracted by the magni flcent physique of the gallant but ini corrigible...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TO GET GOOD POTATOES. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 2 May 1914

TO GET GOOD POTATOES. A piece of old pasture is tine soil for potatoes, The better the turf, the better the crop. A clover sod is about the best. Put a good team on the plough and set the share deep down. Potatoes need a loose, deep-set bed. it is at leg-weary business to tramp back and forth across ploughed ground all day; and yet this is the price of good potatoes. Take your time to it, and be thorough. You will nave time in the long run. The moro harrowing the less cultivating. Get the seed well down, It may not come up so soon, but when it does come it will shoot ahoad fast. A four inch covering is about right.

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FARM JOTTINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 2 May 1914

FARM JOTTINGS. The "'discipline of the farm" is the asset of the farm boy that markcs hii through later life. The endless round of planting and harvesting, the daily care of animals, the regular toil of which there is no cessation, to him so often a dull routine, form altogether an inestimable training in systematic hab. its and thoughts that accounts for his superior achievement in the industries, commerce, and statemanship in late: life. The real opportunity for satisfac tory living in farming comes not so much from the nature of the work as from the fact that the farm is a bust. ness and a home, intricately interwo ven. Life and work united, which is the natural thing. It is much easier to maintain soil in a satisfactory condition of elliciency by crop rotation and the appilication of artificlal manures than to restore it. after it has once been impoverished by the loss of fertilisng constituents. In pasturing lucerne it must not be over-stocked, and the animals will in; jure the...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FARM IMPLEMENTS. How to Run a Reaper. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 2 May 1914

FARM IMPLEMENTS. How to Run a Reaper. With the modern binder, and in a moderately even crop, there should be practically no waste. ,Much un necessary waste is occasioned by not giving the machine the right amount of tilt. Many binder experts argue that the machine should be run quite level-that is to say, the knife bar should not be tilted in any way, but tho whole machine should be horizon tal, their argument being that the bear ings will run more easily owing chiefly to their parts getting more perfectly lubricated. Now, while it must be admitted that there is a certain amount of reason in this, it neverthe less cannot be followed to the letter. The practical driver knows from ex perience that to run the binder abso lutely level means a bad-shaped sheaf with an enormous amount of waste, which is greatly increased if there is a slight hbad breeze, or if the horses should get on a little extra pace.

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHY SILAGE IS ESSENTIAL. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 2 May 1914

WHY SILAGE IS ESSENTIAL. There are several. reasons for the popularity of silage, More feed can be stored in a given space in the form of sllggo than in the form of fodder or hay. There is a smaller loss of food ma terial when a crop is made into silage than when cured as fodder or hay. Corn silage Is a more eomfficient feed than corn fodder, An acre of corIn/can be placed in the silo at less cost than the same area can be husked and shredded. Crops can wbe put in 'the silo dur. lng weather that could not be util* ised in making hay or curing fodder. More stock can be kept on a given area of land when silage is the basis of the ration, There is less waste in feeding silage than in feeding fodder, Good silage properly fed is all consumed, Silage is very palatable, Silage, like other succulent feeds, has a beneficial effect upon the dlges. tive organs, Silage is the best and cheapest form in which a succulent feed can be pro. vided for winter use. Silage can be "used for supplement in...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Imagination. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 2 May 1914

Imagination, The doctor was baffled and the case seemed almost hopeless, and after many different prescriptions the pa tlent still said that his health was not improving. The complant was not of a serious character, and after much thought a happy idea seized the doc tor. lie would try his patient's pow ers of imagination, and approached him in this manner. "Now, my friend, when I call upon you again will you say '1 Imagine I amn a little better to-day,' when I in quire after your health?" The patient replied In the anlirma. tvoe. 'rhe doctor called in a day or two and asked the patient as to lile con. ditlon. Ile replied, "I iImIagilno I ani a little better to-day, sir." "That's right," sald the doctor. "Now the next time I call, will you 'ay '1 Imagine I am a great deal better lthan I was the last time you called,' which, accordingly, the patient did.

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Checkmated. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 2 May 1914

Checkmated, As most peqple know, when travel lng by train In America, the passen ger at the depot of departure hands over his luggage to the ofliciajs, and on payment of a fee receives a metal check, which he returns in exchange for his trunks on arrival at his des tinatlon. The system has its advan tages, but also its drawbacks prob ably, the fatal one of loss of the checks, for the baggage master will only hand over the luggage on receipt of the vouchers, A leading light of English Comic Opera, Miss C,P., was going from New York to Philadelphia to join a cotm pattny. Like a prudent young lady, shite packed away her dollar bills in her swanbill corsets, but her baggage cheecks she had left in her pocket, Pre sently she fell asleep and did not ful ly awake till, in a "semi-dozy" state, she fancied she felt a slight pull at her dress, Opening her eyes she found that a very gentlematnly looking man was sitting next to her. She put her hand in her pocket. The clhecks were gone. . At- t...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW TO AVOID NEURALGIA. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 2 May 1914

HOW TO AVOID NEURALGIA, Two of the conalonest causes of neuralgia are neglected decaying teeth and eye-strain, it may be thae no one parteular tooth is badly decayed, there may be no actual toothache that the sufferer can point to as the rea son for those shooting pains about the cheek or jaw, which "9 endures almost nightly. Nevertheless, in about 50 per cent. of the cases the teeth are at the root of the trouble. Clearly the dentist in such cases is the right doctor, and as a rule a me. dical man will send his patient to the dentist. Many people whose neu ral .gia is due to eye-strain are not con scious of anything the matter with their sight, it may be only when they seek medical advice that the sugges tion of eye trouble is made to them; they go to the oculist, glasses are pro scribed, and the neuralgia disappears. twve may be in a certain physical condition which renders us particular ly ready for neuralgia, the scale being turned by comparatively such small things as a draught...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE ARAB'S SIGN. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 2 May 1914

THE ARAB'S SIGN, During the Egyptian War of 1882 the warship holding the high road to Jerusalem at Kantara, in the Suez Canal, was surrounded by- an atmo sphere of hostility, The one and only, hotel in the place seemed to be the re fuge of all the denizens of the desert, A careful watch had over to be kept, the men were under arms at night as well as day, wild shouts and rushing of feet, strange bugle calls and whist, ling were heard at night; the fresh provisions coming from Port Said every night were rushed by tile prowl ing Bedouins on the banks, the whole or part of them taken. At time'o tihe desert seemed to be alive with smnall parlties of Arabs on thie prowl, always at a safe distance, but nevertheloes near enough to get on the inmen's 11nrves. 'Thlis state of things continued for a mnonth, when suddenly an ovent oc curred which changed the whole 1a pect of the situation. One night the proprietor of the h. tel came on board wringing his lhands with grief, An important 'operat...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
STRANGE COINCIDENCES. Scientific and Literary Parallels. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 2 May 1914

STRANGE COINCIDENCES Scientific and Literary Parallels, In the lives of most of us colnneli dence has played a part, Probably nine out of every ten people can re call events and dates which, co-incid ing with one another, are a source of wonderment. There are some coinci denuces, however, which are of such a character as to call 'for more than casual comment, In the November lssue of the "Strand Magazine," for Instance, there i1 a photograph illustrating a phen omenon only visible in the tropics that of sunshine at noon when no sha. dow is thrown by objects exposed to the sun's rays, the explanation being that the ship upon which the photo. graph was taken was at the moment in the exact nadir of the sun's zenith. The lenonrenon was observed and re. corded by Mr. W. B. Gibbs in latitude 15 dog. South, in February of last year, and it is a singular coincidence that precisely tile same phenomenon was witnessed in 1881 or 1882 by Cap tain W, M. Gibbs, of Cardiff, at about the same time ...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
If You See [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 2 May 1914

If You 8ee Father wearing a purple necktie with pink dots and yellow stripes (on the tie, not on father), you may wager your hat that father doesn't. want to hurt mother's feelings. Your neighbor put all the wlldows up and volumes of smoke pour out, It Is a slgn he-had the nerve to smoke one of his holiday cigars in the house.

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Lesser Evil. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 2 May 1914

The Lesaer Evil. Brigges: You must have a lot of trouble keeping your wife dressed up in the height of style, Origgs: Yes, but it's nothing to thte troublA I'd have it I didn't, UO1ly those who think of nolhing have need of distraction;

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Harmless Ghost. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 2 May 1914

A Harmless Ghost. A stone-cutter, in the days when men wore noeeobreeches and wigs, one evening wished to. add a few letters to an epitaph on a gravestone recently set up. He obtained permission, and went with his tools and lantern to complete the task. The churchyard was .cool and gloomy, and very soon he lighted an extra candle to give more light. Suddenly, as he stooped over the work, he heard a curlous rustling hiss-"Hushl" He lifted his head and looked round but saw nothing. lie tell to work again; but no sooner was his head bowed over the stone than the faint, mysterious "hush!" was heard again. He could stand it no longer, but got up and tied for his life, and was not consoled until he was in bed and fast asleep. The next morning lihe was sitting with his wife at breakfast, when she said suddenly, "loPeter, what is the matter with your wig? It is all hurnt on one side." He gave a cry of joy, to his wife's surprise, The mystery was explain ed-the" strange "hush" was nothing mo...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ONLY JOKING. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 2 May 1914

ONLY JOKING. The following incident occurred re cently on the down mail train between Lahore and Amballa, There were five European passengers in a first-class reserved carriage. The guard of the train was an Eurasian of pronouncedly dark complexion, but a smart and in. telligent man at his work for all that. One of the first class passengers, who was a bounder, thought he would take a rise out of the guard, so, calling him to the carriag, said: "I say, guard, I've got a hat bere, a real silk how. ler, complete in case which I recently purchased from an outfitter's of iorn' bay, It cost mae 30 rupees, and the only fault aboqt it Is that it is a trifle too smalls for me. Judging by the size of your head, it will probably fit you. Would you mind accepting it?" The guard, gratllied at the prospect of such a presant, readily expressed acceptance. The passenger, holding the hat over the panel of the carriage, said, "Here you are, guard; here's the hat, case and all, but just as the guard ...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A GOOD VIOLIN STORY. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 2 May 1914

A GOOD VIOLIN STORY. A young man, poorly clothed, pre. sented himself before a dealer hi curiosities near the Palals Royal. "Sir," said he, showing a violin that he carried, "I am a musical artist; this is the. season of balls and parties, I have Just had a long illness which has exhausted amy purse, my only blacr coat is In pawn; I shall be much oblig. ed if you will lend me ten francs to redeem it. I will leave as security one of the violins you see, for I have two; it is an excellent instrument. shall return for it as soon as, thanks to my coat, I shall have earned enough money for the purpose.": The young man had such an honest bearing that the dealer lent him ten francs, and kept ihe violin, which lihe hung up in the shop. The next day a gentleman, well dressed, wearing at hls button hole the riband of the Legion of Honor, was choosing from the dealer's stock of goods some shell work, Seeing the violin, lie took it up, examining it nar rowly. "What is the price of that igstru m...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHURCH NEWS. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 2 May 1914

CHURCH NEWS. The special preacher at All Saints', Preston, to-morrow morning andl even ing will be Rev. C. H. V. Eva, B.A. The Rev. B. L. Semmens will be ten dered a farewell social in the South Preston Methodist school hall this even ing. At Holy Trinity, Thornbury, on Sun day, the Rev. L. Beveridge, of Horsham, will conduct the services, morning and evening. The Rev. R. W. Rock's subject at the Northeote Presbyterian Church to-mor row morning will be "The Purpose of Life." The Rev, J, H. Marshall, B.A., will occupy the pulpit in the evening. Anniversary services of the Prince of Wales' Park Methodist S.S. will be con tinued to-morrow, the preachers being -Rev. L. Tait (11 a.m.)I J. H. Cain (3 p.m.), and Hon. W. H. Edgar (7 p.m.) At the Northcote Congregational Church on Sunday evening the Rev. A. R. Bunton will deliver a special address to young men on the subject, "The Came of Life." Footballers are specially invited. Excellent music will be provi ded, The ladies of the Preston M...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A STAR OF THE STAGE. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 9 May 1914

A STAR OFITHE STAGE. I By H. J. BICKILE, The man halted on the threshold of the studio, his eyes wandering from the living model to the picture that was growing 'beneath the inspired touches of the famous artist, then back again his gaze returned to the child who was posing for the single figure that looked out fromnt the can. vas--the "Glow-worn Queen"-tho fairy figure of a little girl anlidset somne flowers, on which, through the ovo\'ollllg llsts, glow-wortlu were falnt, ly shining. Philip Slade drew a deep, silent breath, and the color obbed away fromn beneath thie sun blackened features. He could feel it rush to his heart, with a swift, bewildering emotion that shook hls whole being, What face was this, so like the face of a woman belonging to the past-this lovely, childish face that, even as he v;atched, himself unseen, seemed slowly to whiten, and surely that slight, frail form swayed unsteadily? Slade strode across the room, just in time to catch the little girl as she colla...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Cook and the Coachman. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 9 May 1914

The Cook and the Coachman, A dispute had long existed in a getntleuiman's family between the cook and the coach nmn, about bringing the cream from the farm for breakfast, Their master one morning called them both before him that he might hear what they had to say. The cook pleaded tlhat the coach man was lounging about the kitchen the best part of tile morning, yet he was so Ill.natured that he would not (otch the cream for her, though he saw she had not a moment to spare. Th coachman said it was not his busi. ness, "Very well," said the master; "'but what do you call your business?" "To take care of the horses and clean and drive the carriage," replied the coachman. "You say right," answered the mas. ter, "and I do not expect you to do more than that for which I pay you; but this I Insist upon-that every morning before breakfast you got the carriage ready, and drive the cook to the farmer's for the cream; and I hope that you will allow that to be part of your business," The stout p...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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