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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

""'V ff "jpgpiIJiJdfi "HfT '.r r-r 'IP"? l""i- j-"-. w, JT"" 'km1' V'"H"i-f('!ml'WfSWv'"i "" '' ' ""' " r"' ' go The Indian Advocate. round by saints; and he could see on every side nunneries and monasteries and churches, immortal pillars of the faith that he had planted and nurtured through the toil of tddious years. Nor did Patrick's death put a period to his Apostolic labors. Of him, more than of any other man, it may be said t that he lived immortally, in his spiritual descendants, For more than a thousand years, the work of the Irish saints was the glory of Christendom. From the 5th to the 10th centuries, Ireland was the teacher of the nations. All the world went to school in Erin. The whole island was covered with schools and monasteries, in which learned men, the intellectual giants of their age received the countless thousands of students who flocked to them from every land. Whole cities were given up to them. Talk of free, public schools as a modern idea. Why the Irish Monk...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

The Indian Advocate. gi some palates, it is yet a fact which the raercilees scrutiny of history has placed beyond all question, that England owes more to Ireland and Irishmen than to any other nation on God's footstool. Nearly 1,300 years have passed since Patrick sighed out his joyful "nunc dimittis." Many a sad 'change has passed upon the land he loved. Language, laws, customs, all have changed. But one thing has not changed the faith of the Irish race, Yes, through good report and evil report, the sons of Patrick have clung to the faith that Patrick planted. It has been their one consolation amid their many miseries, their one comfort when there was no comfort elsewhere. Our fathers braved death and torture for the faith of the Saint they loved; fire and the sword, the gibbet and the prison were tried in vain, to shake their allegiance to their God; the waves of persecu tian rolled over them, as the sea-waves beat upon the shore, and left them like the rock unmoved. There is not ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

92 The Indian Advocate. 1901. X CALENDAR. MARCH. 1901. X i. Ember Day, Sacred Lance and Nails D. N. J. C. D. maj. 2. Ember Day, St. 'Switbert Bp. C. O. S. B. D. 3. Second Sunday in Lent (St. Anselm Abbot) Semid 4. St. Casimir King C. Semid. 5. St. Chunegundis Empress V. O. S. B. D. 6. Bl. Joan M. Bonomo V. O. S. B. D. 7. St. Thomas Aquinas C. D. D. 8. Sacred Winding Sheet D. N. J. C. D. maj. 9. St. Frances of Rome Wid. O. S. B. D. 10. Third Sunday in Lent, (LX Mm.) Semid. 11. St. Vincent Abbot, M. O. S. B. D. 12. St. Gregory, the Great, Pp. C. D. O. S. B. D. 2 cl. 13. S. S. Ramirus and Comp. Mm. O. S. B. D. 14. St. John of God, C, D. 13. Sacred V. Wounds, D. N. J. C. D. maj. 16. Bl. Lawrence the Hermit, C, O. S. B. D. 17. Fourth Sunday in Lent, (St. Patrick) Semid 18. St. Gabriel the Archangel, D. maj. 19. St. Joseph, Patron of the Univ Church, D. 1 cl. 20. St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Bp. C. D. D. 2i. St. Benedict Abbot, D. 1 cl with Oct. 22. St. Mathias, Ap, (Feb. 24,) D. 2 cl. 23. Of ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 33 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

o fl o a o a 93 CUD 93 &0 60 S' -s -, - 5 O 0) o S c8 u o tX tuD a) o o J3 3 s o o en en o c u bo . o en 5 JZ Ji o u ,! v o s en s s o Souls m o co CM HI m vo en CO CO CO in Xx & CO o m tj- "" "-! VO Communicants at the Schools o VO o en Total No. Members St, Mary's Society CO vo CO en vo vO o Ov o O CO VO m vo o St. Joseph's Society I'SS-SStnc-fl " j I en n No. I. H. Communs n m n co m1 I vo o co F n in ci oo en vo No of H ComranniniT! u- oo en c t n m co en m i.ty. ui ii. uiuuuiu o en -- n N c en en id vO . " Funerals " 'S m !? ' c en 2 . i Marriages I o n n I n cf Families Total E O in O m en "4" IH N "1- M CO CO m m r fe -2. S 3 Gfl . s en M CO O en m m n en S o E tf CO W H H 1 Q Pk . co 3 5 "0 0 .2 3 0 . 2 rH "33 3 07 cq e CO o u e .2 e 13 rt C u 0) n o e to C fe c "5. s o u O P J3 u o " 5j" u fe cq j-. 55 2 j3 " C3 a o c c rt u o o J5 fe en o U u c en eu 6 ca O JO o O 0) -3 CQ a) -3 cq h fe P is -w S a) (U X5 . .s - a en U a O .a u -. xs U w .2 en 0) "C C rt o J3 o u U...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

ruL . fVwgriw''ifir :i t. I- The Indian Advocate. Vol. XIII. APRIL, 1901. No. 4. ATRLTJTA. MAKE, happy clay, to joy once more, And hid thy sunshine flood the hills: Break, shining waves, along the shore, Be jubilant, ye sparkling rills; For the King Whom they scourged and crowned as an abject thing' Whom they mocked on His bloody throne, The King hath come to His own! Alleluia! Blow, gentle winds, through silent vales, Bear the sweet tidings far and near; Glow, pure soft blossoms of the dales Lift, tender grass, each dewy spear, For the Lord, Whom they nailed to the cross and pierced with a sword, Hath passed the gates of Death's dark prison The buried Christ hath risen! Alleluia! Sing, little birds, in forests deep, And ye who cheer the haunts of men, Ring, joyous chimes, from turrets steep, Toll, toll no more, be glad again, For the God Whose footprints reddened the way He trod, , Who for his own was slain, Hath conquered Death and pain. Alleluia! Shall only men be silent? Nay, Aw...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

95 The Indian Advocate. OUTLINE OF SPANISH-ZUNI HISTORY. HY FRANK HAMILTON CUSHING. It is true that the Zunis of to-day are as eager as were their forefathers for baptism and for baptismal names addi tional to their own. But it must be remembered that baptism the purification of the head by sprinkling or of the face by washing with medicine-water, was a very old institution with this people even before the Spaniards found them. With them anyone being named anew or assuming a new person ality or office is invariably sprinkled or washed "that he be the more cleanly revealed and the better recommended in his new guise and character to the gods of spirits" invoked for the occasion, "and thus be constantly recognized by them as their child, named of themselves, and so be made a special recipient of theit favor." This custom is observed, indeed, on many occasions,, as on reaching puberity or before any great change in life, or before initiation into the sacred socie ties, as well as both ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

?Si!fyiii' ? "r"P"f'"v nw.wwywy. 'ly'y''fflpipip Tub Indian Auvucati:. 96 seemed not only familliar to the Zunis, but also eminently proper and desirable on occasion of their accepting the bene fits of initiation into what they supposed was the Ka ka, or one of the general sacred societies of these other people. No wonder, then, that when about to be baptized they insisted on giving their own sacred names of the Ka ka, if only as a sure ty of their full recognition under them in this new Ka ka. no less than under the new names they are about to receive.' It is also true that the Zunis do not again burn the dead and cast their ashes into the river, nor bury the bodies of the clan elders, or the priests of the tribal septuarchy, in their own houses, as they did ere the time of Corotiado, or "under the ladders," as their rituals continue nevertheless to say they do. They bury all, now, in the little strip of consecrated ground out in front of the church; ground already so overfilled wi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

The Indian Advocate. no matter what his rank, condition, or haste, to a sequestered room, where, although courteously treated and hospitably en tertained without charge, he is securely locked up and rigor ously guarded until after the dance or other observance is over. "The fathers of these Mexicans did violence to our fathers," say the Indians in explanation, "when that our fathers of old called the sacred Ka ka. Therefore, in those days our fathers sought to hide the dancers from their eyes. Our fathers come nigh in breath, when now we call the Ka ka, and they aid our songs and prayers to the beloved gods of Rain and Wind. Kow, if they see we have departed from their customs, and reveal these things? Then will they be sad at our forgetfulness of their ways, and filled with fear lest these evil people, beholding, do sacrilege to their precious Ka ka, and will flee away, nor aid our songs and prayers for rain, nor our calls for their beloved presence!" The Zuni faith, as revealed in...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

yiM...jjW;TW.IPfi H ii. nipjT.-.-r. -ft .M-tW'.?' II .J E Jip I MIU IM') Thk Indian Auvocatk." , ' 9? " I ', ! !. ,-,..-. I I - native culture, neither discolors nor displaces his original lore. All of the foregoing suggests what might be more fully shown by further examples, the aboriginal and uncontaminated character so far as a modern like myself can represent it of the myths delineated in the following series of outlines. Yet a casual visitor to Zuni, seeing but unable to analyze the signs above noted, would be led to infer quite the contrary by other and more patent signs. He would see horses, cattle and don keys, sheep and goats, to say nothing of swine and a few scrawny chickens. He would see peach orchards and wheat fields, carts (and wagons now), and tools of metal; would find, too, in queer out-of-the-way little rooms, native silversmiths plying their primitive bellows and deftly using a few crude tools of iron and stone to turn their scant silver coins into bright buttons...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

tFvvr v -WFK&rT'm ' q-Tr? -- gg The Indian Advocate. of the soil when wheat and peaches were given him. To this day he plants and irrigates his peach trees and wheat crops much as he anciently planted and watered his corn in hills, hoeing all with equal assidity; and he does not reap his wheat, but gathers it in as he gathers his corn in the ear. Thus, only the kind of grain is new. The art of rearing it and ways of husbanding and using it remain unchanged. The Zuni was already a herder when sheep and goats were given him. He had not only extensive preserves of rabbits and dear, but also herds rather than flocks of turkeys, which by day were driven out over the plains and mesas for feeding, and at night housed near the towns or in distant shelters and corrals. It is probable that his ancestry had even other domescated animals. And he used the flesh of these animal as food, their feathers and fur as the materials for his wonderfully knitted, woven, and twilled garments and robes,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

'Try?"" 7Titwiwrg'"iRVAiy''j.'j The Indian Advocate. ioo This applies equally to their handling of the hoes, hatchets and knives of civilized man. They use their hoes the heavi est they can get as if weighted, like the wooden and bone hoes of antiquity, vertically, not horizontally. They use their hatchets or axes and knives more for hacking and scraping and chipping than for chopping, hewing, and whittling, and in such operations they prefer working toward themselves to working from thdmselves, as we work. Finally, their garments of calico and muslin are new only iii material. They are cut after the old fashion of the ancestral buckskin breeches and shirts, poncho coats of feathers and fur or fiber, and down or cotton breech clouts, while in the silver rings and bracelets of to-day, not only the shapes but even the half-natural mark ings of the original shell rings and bracelets survive, and the silver buttons and bosses but perpetuate and multiply those once made of copper as well...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

The Indian Advocate. 102 Crazy Snake and his band of Creeks and Choctaws will cut a rather small figure in the history of the Indian troubles of the past twenty-five or thirty years in comparison with that of some of the other red men. When Geronimo and Natchez, the Apaches, broke out of their reservation in Arizona, in the' early 80s they left a trail of blood and fire behind 'them for several hundred miles along the frontier. It took the whole of the soldiers who could be spared for duty in the Southwest about three years to capture and subdue them. Some of the most skilled Indian fighters in the army, including Crook and Miles, were in the campaigns against Geronimo. Scores of lives wene lost among the soldiers and hundreds of white settlers were killed. Sitting Bull, who was conspicuous in the Custer campaign, and who made trouble on the frontier for many years, participated in the last Indian war of any conse quence which flie United States is ever likely to see, that in the ne...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

k i Tr5K"viV,y -. J-- . '.-" "i t V. f "' ,k 103 The Indian Advocate. THE SEMINOLES. OUR DUTY TO THESE WARDS OF THE NATION. Under the present status the Seminoles are prosperous, happy and contented. But the vanguard of civilization is marching on, and thinking friendly minds must solve the question of the protection- of this remnant of a tribe we have dispossessed of their national right. Dwellers of every land from Scandinavia to Japan have a christian welcome to our shores. The -slums of Europe pour in upon us to fill our almshouses and to be supported by our taxes. We have dur ing the past quarter of a century contributed more than $5,000 000 to the education of the freedmen; yet, except in individual cases, the improvement is scarcely noticeable. Men and wo men are sacrificing their lives for the heathen of other lands. Christianity is donating millions of money to this md, while our own "wards" too many of them are yet living in the super stitions of their fathers. It is possi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

S--wjr i Tk-- ' -i-- wGn"!&nr " JW " ' . J. - u.ji-fMh Ait tha . : t Tnc Indian Advocatk. 104 - - rising generation for the order of events that must come. Be cause these bands ol the Seminoles are prouder, more Invin cible than the old Saxons, because they are savages, yet heroes many of them, all the good of life should not be withheld frrm them. It has taken years of labor to obtain the shining of even the few rays of light that relieve the gloom of.the heathen coun tries of the. Orient. It would be unreasonable to expect the" offspring of savages to attain in a short time to anything like the thrift of a Nation like ours. Yet, with a few years of hu mane treatment, unviolated pledges, with christian and patri otic examples set before them, this little band of Florida In dians would become worthy representatives of this fair land. Were any future danger to threaten the United States, the Seminoles would be found to be brave allies. The pledge to General Worth, by this remnant...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

105 The Indian Advocate. isy YA :v; i u r "We cannot undo the past, but the future is in the hands of the people. In Canada there are 100,000 Indians. They' are called the Indian subjectsof His Majesty; all held amen able to the law and protected by it. Statistics show that on one side of the line the nation has spent millions of money in Indian wars, while on the other, with the same greedy Anglo Saxon race, not one dollar has been spent and there has never been a massacre. The caustic remark that the only good Indian is a dead Tndian, might apply to the savage Apache; but when one has studied the home life of the Seminoles, observed their domes tic felicity from which many white men might take example, noted their peaceful, contented character, he can only see in them an attractive race, and worthy the proud lineage they 'claim. Surely if ever the strong were bound to aid the weak, wa-are bound to help them, to treat them as human beings, possessed of human rights and deserving th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

s . - f'- - A fa' RfcV .'. ;r " " :, v. - V TOfa.-' : '; X-'. ' V' 'L v AMs&gft iji "'$ 'A , r ). J- ' v .v.. ' .;. ..''?. - ? : ' ''5 t'iiMtjjjam lijS9Sfl Tallahasee, Late Chief of the Seminoles, and his Family. '4 . v.- r- '; - ' " :- .--!;..--' ' ' - " , v .-. v., V .- ,r, '. ' - -!' ' r - i,-.3 V -V - ,' , -" , y .-..-d J .1 .3 , Vl ' . v ( ,'! . . jn '' - ?t -'-::1 iLlt. ftfc.'

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

R.5. - ' 'KMfa - "' : c.- 'V - -4 -V ,f . . rp ' ' n, -J ' . P6f' ',Krt ,Tf , r.W. ' Fs -'r yfsf : &". 7 ;' - &v Two Seminole Youths. Billy Bowlegs. Tom Bogles. ': 'N-.. - ':;; ' v.y ' T ' " r''V i' 9 .. -V 1 , . ' -f ;" '- '"'.' ;'v'C'i .' '

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

""9 r tib. 1'hc Indian Advocati,. 106 8 - 1 A 'J& -ri'ki.-. be like parting from his kindred. No, under the shadows of the live oak and the magnolia has he lived, under their shad ows let him die. As the patient Seminoles, with swelling heart "moves a little farther, and yet a little farther," he goes vnot willingly, but with a sad heart and a slow step. Micanopy, when told by the officers, that he might choose between emi gration and death; answered, "kill me here then kill me quickly," The same spirit is manifested by the Seminoles to-day, when he says; "We have never done anything to dis grace the land of our birth, nor the honor of an Indian. For fifty years and more the pledge to our great father has been kept inviolate. Our tongues are not forked and our feet tread not in the white man's path. We threw away the rifle and grasped hands with the white skin. We know the wliite man's power and though we love peace, we fear not death. We will not leave the land of our biith. Th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1901

BBHsE22ff25333353!!!!!55!HHH3!!5HH5HHi58iHHB!HMBBBBi wSjgpt'fjiiijmiiiiif fflp' 'JWJwwifwjF j1?' ws'TT IO7 The Indian Advocate. ., THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 3?tJBIiISIIED BY TIIM BTaNKDIOTINK FATHEKS OP SACKED HEART MISSION, OKX.AIIOMA. 'A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved by Rt. Rev. Theo. Mcerschacrt. Vicar-Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian Territories. TERMS OF SUBSOR.ITriO'Xi Single Copies 15c Annual Si. 00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each 750. Foreign : $1.25. - Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart, Oklahoma. j. Every Subscriber and Benefactor will participate in all the merits, prayer, and pood works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. 2. A solemn High Mass is sung every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Su...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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