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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 July 1898

10 DISEASED WHEAT AND OATS. Several specimens of diseased wheat and eats have been sent to the Oregon experi mental station for examination within the past few weeks. Mention has been made of this trouble in several papers of the state, in dicating that the disease is quite common. Concerning the matter, Prof. H. T. French, agriculturist at the station, says: "Samples have come to us from Clackamas and Marion counties, and we find the same difficulty in the field on the college farm. Upon looking up the literature on this sub ject, we find mention made < f a similar trou ble in the Journal of Mycology, published in September, 1800. The disease is described I'L-der the head of 'A New and Destructive Oat Disease.' "The description of this disease corre sponds exactly with our own observations of the trouble, as it appears in the college Melds The plants are affected when from >-ix inches te a foot high. The leaves turn brown at th« tips, or a reddish cast, and gradually die back...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 July 1898

*-phe poultry Yard. S. M. SHIPLEY, : : : : : : Editor. MORE EGG RECORDS. From the June issue of Pacific Poultryman we dip the following reports of <■££ average* for the mouth of February. 1898, as therein published over the signatures of several well known western poultrvnien. Silver Dorkings—Stephen Holbrook, the popular president of Tacoma Poultry Club, says that his three hens and three pullets, of' Silver Gray Dorkings, laid 118 eggs, an average of 182-8 per female. Huff Plymouth Hocks —Paul E. Kenir. dy, uutchkiss, 001., reports from his flock of four Huff Bocks for months of March, April and May, 1897, an ejjtf production of 82, 8:t, 82, or an average per hen for the three months of Black Minorcas —L. B. Storer, Springfield, Wash., from his prise pen of fourteen Minor cas, reports 309 eggs for one month, or 22} eggs per hen. He further says the otfjjs weighed -47 pounds, or 30 ounces per dozen. Partridge Cochins—Mrs, C. H. Forrest, Oakville, Wash., from ten Partridge Cochin...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 July 1898

12 HARKET REVIEW. SEATTLE. Jobbing quotations; what produce is sell ing at in round lots: The strawberry season is about over. They are scarcer now and getting higher in price, S5e(Y/sl. Home grown raspberries art' be ginning to come in freely. Native blackber ries have not appeared yet. Celery, 35@40c per dos; lettuce, 36c; rad ishes, 10c; new onions, $1 per hundred: new cabbage, l@l£c per lb for native; parsnips, per sack, 75@90c; cauliflower, 75c per dos; rhubarb, lie; Walla Walla asparagus, $1 per 15-lb box; hot-house cucumbers, 50@65c; gooseberries, '2{v; new turnips, l()c per dozen bunches; California cherries, 25@60c; green plums, 60@90c per box; apricots, ftl per box; black cherries, 50@66c per crate; string beans, 6@Bc per lb; raspberries, $1.50 per -4 qts; native currants. 60@75c per box; hot house tomatoes, llHc lb. Cherries are 50c for 10-11) box of good Washington cherries; peas, 4c. Potatoes —Burbanks, |7@9. There is no sale for rose potatoes. Old potatoes are almost w...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 July 1898

SAN FRANCISCO. Wheat—Shipping, |1.20@1.22i for No. 1; milling, |L35@1.4& Barley—Feed, |1.10@L15; brewing nom inal. Flour—Net cash for family extras, $sf<r/) 5.10; bakers' extras, |4.75@4.88. CHICAGO. Wheat — Damage from the excessive rama in that portion of the country where harvest ing is under way created a bullish sentiment in wheat. The weather in Great Britain was unfavorable. Paris, Antwerp and Budapest complained of continuous rain and Great Britain joined in the same complaint. In ad dition reports of poor yields, compared with previous expectations, came from almost ev ery quarter of the American winter wheat region, wiiere harvesting had been completed. A slight rise in price was the result. June wheat is 78Jc; July, 78cj September, G7^c; December, ()7ijr</()7^c. Cattle—Choice steers, |4.90@5.30; me- Many Of Our Customers Have Been Buying "DEMENTS BEST" FLOUR From us during the past eight years. As an extra inducement to those who are unfamiliar with this superb ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 July 1898

14 WHATCOM COUNTY. It is reported thai there arc at lon si 130 more individual farm owners in Whatcom count v than there were in 1897j and the tend ency to divide the farms into trails of from 10 to 40 acres is now well established. The v.ool clip will be 36 per cent, greater this year than in 1897, and the fruit crop will be at least 26 per cent, greater than that of IS!>7. which was the banner fruit year of Whatcom county's history. It is estimated from much definite information that 45,0(10 fruit trees have been planted in Whatcom county since the season of 1807 and that fully 4,000 new trees will tome into bearing this year. 50 per cent, of them being apple trees, 36 per cent, cherry trees, and 15 per cent pear trees, practically all confined to a few standard varieties. BINDER TWINE. Farmers are tfoin^ to feel war prices very Strongly in buying binder twine this year, according to the Northwest Agriculturist The war \v the Philippine Islands affects twine seriously. We have ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 July 1898

VALPHA-DE LAVAL" CREAM SEPARATORS. a^-^. De TjAtsA Alpha 111 ill rtM "Baby" Cream S«i»h --<? I In -J'MT I rutortt were first ana rF 1 '■ Jmt™ have ever been kept. ri||J if best and cheapest. The} are J %jM guaranlced superior to all ip imitations and infriiiße- incuts. Endorsed by till au >!»iwH^ thoritlCß. More than 1-5,000 aX* Jl'aß Jm in use. Sales ten to one of all flfs|!§Ms§l others combined. All styles %jrwHmWEi Save $•">.- to $10.- per cow tK IhHL«s\ per year over any setting P5-sioiu, and $3.- to -SklßmC^^ — tatinf? separator. <<rfT^3GlP^^>^^ New and improved . >^^?3K§Sr*"^ loguo containing h fund of up-to-date dairy information. THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR GO. RandTh.ca C go LBTB- i 74 ANVO R SREE Aggers & Parker Produce and Commission. Cash paid for POULTRY and EGGS, also all Produce shipped to our Alaska Branch. All consignments receive prompt attention. 911 Western Avenue • Seattle, Wash. B KEEPERS! SEND FOR sample copy of GLEANIN6S IN BEE CULTURE. A ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 July 1898

16 ..TWO CHAMPIONS.. CSJoSofroifr^f^s. J«mL w> 1 1 1 El? E5 /»l» j>*--^ J »^^^Ml\ll\)i)llr!'N^\ « THE WHEELS WILL NOT LIFT FROM THE GROUND. J Champion Draw Cut Mower. Champion Wobble Gear Mower. Adapted to prairie on straight smooth cutting. Adapted to cutting in timbered sections where there are some stumps. The Two Best Mowers on Earth! Write For Catalogue. of. New Champion Binder " %*„,*,' Also Catalogue of Dllluer Dandy." MITCHELL, LEWIS & STAYER CO., FißandTalorSs Portlan B l h ?!;w and s eatl c v% «^ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ *^ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦ The Milwaukee Leads! •-""■^^ifyY^rtrps^^St^Si^^ 2*^ nil WAI BINDER. --^N^^g^^^g^--^"^****--^**^— •«■»• ' llLWAUlvtltl L>li>LJClv« -i-^ujrfWttfm^■ ■ *~~ Furnished in three cut widths, 5 foot, 6 foot or 7 fIILWAUKEE fIOWER. Steel is the principal material in the Milwaukee. ■■.■/■ i ;;/', s;- -■'_■, -. c There is scarcely any wood but tongue, reel-slats Furnished in four cut widths; 4% foot, 5 foot, 6 and...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 July 1898

Ranch And Range 7^ ISSUED EVERY WEEK *f|fr \aL 4, No. 15 fSi . X 1! 7f^T^III\T fii H —• AA/tJ HI r\r •= B I EVERYONE'S REACH, I ||| . , iiiihii iifag, A DeLaval Cream Separator M i^ IBmI Hillljllliilb ililil I■' The Baby No. 0, of 200 lbs capacity per hour, that is to say, one that will sep- ||||| IS J^KJf !™iilip iliii I • '■ arate 200 lbs of milk in that given time, has now been put on the market by !ps| "%$$ !^H| i: % Blfll the manufacturers for the sum- of SIXTY-FIVE DOLLARS, all complete and iff! iSe- it ii'iiii 1111 l ready to run. At such a price, no one with from 4to 10 cows need go on los- £^Ji f|g| - I^HI &• Siiliil|W Ifiill ing mont by dairying under the old wasteful methods; for a 10-cow to 15-cow ■ §p^ fes . Il__-jjJp - dairy, the Baby No. 1, with a capacity of 300 lbs of milk Tier hour is just the '^j| |m| ■ 'irf "^^ thing. Fora 15 to 25-cow dairy, we have the Baby No. -. capacity 400 lbs of |||| ''■ SI il milk per hour; over that size, we recommend the Baby No. 3,...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 July 1898

2 The Wind Bloweth Where it Listeth Tin? T?TT«?KFT/i\r inMPnTTNr>TRACTTON saying holds good, but with the RUSSELL - : T^S^ i COMPOUND TRACTION CYCLONE and MASSJLLON FARMERS' ENGINE is the most powerful Engine built. FRIEND WIND STACKER it does not, for It saves one-third to one-half in fuel and we regulate the blasts to blow where they ! water, is of less weight than the single cyliu- will do the most good. Our Machines for ; . der style, and the price is right. If you con- 1898 are models of perfection. They are built template buying an ENGINE, BOILER, especially for the Pacific Coast trade, have '. THRESHER, SAW MILL or HORSE , . extra large shoe and are substantial in all 4; POWER write for our 1898 catalogue, and - their parts. The CYCLONE will thresh the when in Portland call and see us and examine fastest, clean the best, run the lightest and \'. our line of machinery. * . last the longest. •; If You Contemplate Buying, Write us for Catalogue. : Russell & Co., Portland,...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 July 1898

RANCH AND RANGE- Vol. 4, No. 15 TILLINGHAST IS RIGHT. Editor Ranch and Range: There is much good sense in the letter of Mr. Tillinghast in your issue of June 18. I wish to reinforce gome of his remarks by reciting our expe rience at the experiment station. We have learned that many kinds of seeds brought from distant parts of the United States do not do nearly so well here the first year as home grown seeds. This is especially true of corn. We have planted many varieties of corn, and have had seed from nearly every where, twit our silage crop is always planted from seeds grown near us. A few years ago we got 50 varieties of wheat from the Kansas experiment station. The first year the average yield of these 50 varieties was 75 per cent, of the yield of home grown Little Club. But these same varieties, after growing here one year, yielded 104 per cent, of the yield of Little Club. Another most serious difficulty that must be contended with is weeds. We have bought seeds that turned ou...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 July 1898

4 they could be shipped farther than we now ship them, and thus enlarge our market and help the Seattle market." "What variety is the next best?" "The Jessie and the Sharpless are the next best sellers, on account of their high color.'' '•How about shipping?" "They arc not good shippers. The only good shipper is the (Mark's Seedling. The Wilson is pretty good for shipping, but it is a small berry. This has not been a profit able year for the growers. Not on account of the large quantity of berries offered, but on account of the weather. The first week weather that they water soaked. These are unprofitable features of strawberry growing for which there appears to be no remedy. 1' "Have you anything to say in regard to cherries?" "Good cherries are just commencing to come in, but if the wet, cool weather con tinues it is going to be bad for cherries as well as strawberries. We would advise all there was so much sunshine and warm weather that the berries were sunburned; then following ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 July 1898

PREPARING SHEEP FOR SHOWS. lii the selection of suitable subjects for preparation for exhibition, even the veteran showman at times finds himself deep down in the vale of embarrassment; especially is this true in the mating of pairs, or pens of either sex; and the one who can put up a pen with the combination of high quality, and true flock likeness is a true shepherd. How often we find a lamb in our flock that is of such extraordinary merit as to entirely outclass anything we have on the farm in this line; and whilst he is a sure winner as a single entry, his high merits would not count much if shown with a mate as a pair—whose type and general characteristics were at variance. Hence, great importance should be paid to selection of suitable subjects nnd careful mating, or pairing. Having selected our show Hock, we are ready for the preliminary fit ting. In the first place, we will shear all, except ing the lambs. Very many exhibitors violate the rules set forth in the premium lists...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 July 1898

6 BINDER TWINE. The binder twine market is in such a shape now adays that we concluded to get some information concerning it for the benefit of our readers. For this purpose we had an interview with Mr. Poison, of the Poison-Wilton Company, Seattle. Mr. Pol son says that it looks now as though there was going to be a shortage of binding twine. At pres ent he has not more than half enough to meet the calls which are certain to be made for it. A ball of pure manila twine, which contains 650 feet, is retailing in job lots at 15 cents per pound. In fact, almost every kind of twine is selling for the same price. It apparently makes but little difference whether it is pure manila twine or not, just so i* is twine. Mr. Poison says he does not want to make the scare in regard to twine any worse than it is, for the present situation may be only a scheme of the jobbers to force the market up as much as they possibly can. The war and its influence in shutting out the shipping of manila from th...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 July 1898

ji stock nicely, but neither is the equal in yield or general appearance to the French varieties. The German prunes are discarded altogether by northern growers. The rule is to plant prune trees 18 feet apart, each way. This gives spreading room and room sufficient to cultivate during the younger growth of the tree. The mistake of allowing the orchard to go uncultivated at any time should not, however, be made, ('lover may be grown among the trees, and turned under after cutting a crop for hay, but after the trees become well grown only a hand scythe may be used near the rows of I ices, says a writer in the Oregonian. In the vicinity of La Grande the farmers are plant ing .vugar beets among the new orchards and mid their cultivation excellent for the fruit trees. This is possible only where the trees are small. Major Humphrey has 35 acres planted to pi unes. The trees* in his orchard are now 9 years old, and from his 5,000 trees the major expects to harvest 10,000 bushels of prunes....

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 July 1898

8 Ranch and Range ISSUED F.VKKY SATURDAY. 11l the interests of the Farmers, Horticulturists, and Stockmen of Washington' Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah, British Columbia. published by thk RANCH AND RANGE COMPANY. t'ONiiucTßl) by - MILLEH FKEKMAN Assistant Editor - 11. M. WALLACE, B. A. Editorial Offices, .... Seattle, Wash. BITBINESB OFFICES! Seattle, ... 315-316 Pioneer building. Spokane, - - Suite F Hypotheek bank building. SIinSf.'RIPTION, IN ADVANCE, - $1.00 PKR YEAR. Address all communications to Ranch and Range, 315-316 Pioneer building, Seattle, Washington. At Anacortes a representative saw last week two 100-ton schooners loading hay from the Skagit flats for San Francisco. Two schoonerloads have already been sent out from this port, and new contracts being made indicate that several more are to follow shortly. The drouth in California is responsible for this demand and will clean up all of the surplus of last year. Anacortes, by the way, is becoming one of the most important s...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 July 1898

be beggars and preachers. Haying has commenced and there is a great coat of it on the ground now. If the sound weather will hold up we will harvest the best crop of hay ever known here, and grain is promising a full yield. Stock is doing finely. By the way, I sold a 15-months-old Berkshire boar to Thompson & Callandar, of Orting, weighed 405 pounds. I had intended him for the state fair, but 1 have younger ones that will make a small black spot wherever they may be, and the Shorthorns are coming along in good shape, but the railroad freight plays the devil with shipping. Fourth of July over here. Only think of it! Two celebrations, one at Page's Grove, west side, and one in the city. Don't we grow? WM. A. CONANT. A NEW WAY TO PRESERVE MEAT. Consul J. D. Hughes reports to the State Depart ment from Sonneberg as follows: "A new method of preserving freshly killed meats has been discovered by the Danish zoologist, Au gust Fjelstrup, already well known through his method of condensi...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 July 1898

10 VIEW OF CALVES IN RAPE FIELD. This illustration was taken on the Hazelwood Dairy Co.'s farm, near Spokane, and shows a num ber of fine looking calves that have been raised largely on buttermilk, the feeding value of which is so frequently questioned. The calves appear to be thriving on the buttermilk with the addition of rape pasturage. Mr. Smith is in the foreground, and is making some remarks on rape. Listen: "As a fodder plant I would say I think it one of the finest green feeds we have ever tried. Cows do as well on it as on any green feed we have tried, and when fed right after milking the milk will be free from the taste. We have turned the cows on the patch without any bad results. Sheep, hogs and poultry do equally well on it. It seems to be par ticularly adapted for fattening sheep, and with a light grain feed hogs will fatten rapidly. For poul try it cannot be excelled, both for egg production and growing the young chicks." FRUIT CANNING PROGRESS. An immense amount of s...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 July 1898

*Y*he poultry Y arc S. M. SHIPLEY, : : : : : : Editor. REARING YOUNG TURKEYS. "It is best to confine the brood for a week, at least, after hatching," says Mrs. George Smith, of Pennsylvania, in the American Agriculturist. Should the mother hen then become restless, she may be let out during the middle of the day. As the turkey retires early and dislikes being disturbed after set tling down for the night, be sure and coop them before the sun sets. The young turkeys will eat but little the first week. Feed sepa rate from the mother, for she will devour all the"food within reach. For downright greed iness an old turkey hen has few equals. Dry bread soaked in sweet milk is one of the best foods for the young, as is curd from fresh buttermilk. A whole flock has been raised on warm curd. A custard made of one egg to a pint of milk, thickened with bread (no sugar), is a good food. When about two months old feed whole wheat part of the time, and mix corn meal with their food. This should no...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 July 1898

1L» HARKET REVIEW. SEATTLE. Jobbing quotations; what produce is selling at in round lots: I here are only a few cases of strawberries coming in each day. The raspberry market is stiffening as straw berries oecome fewer, because 'there are not enough to supply the market. The cherry market is good for good stock, but most of the cherries coming in tiave been split by rains and sell for hard.y more than enough to pay the freight. Native blackberries have not appeared yet. Celery, 35(y4ue per aoz; lettuce, toe; radishes, 10c; new onions, *1 per hundred; new cabbage, KjilVic per lb for native; parsnips, per sack, 75^90c; cauliflower, 75c per doz; rhubarb, lV^c; Walla Walla asparagus, $1 per 15-lb box; hot-house cucumbers, sixy.6sc; gooseberries, 2*4 c; new turnips, 10c per dozen bunches; green plums, WM&> yOc per box; apricots, 75(Li9Oc per box; olack cherries, 50 (<<tJsc per crate; string beans, ti(s7c per lb; raspberries, $1.25^(1.50 per 24 qts; naitive currants, 6O(et<...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 July 1898

Sales of Wool. Wool—Oregon'! stock-raisers are in no hurry to accept the prices for wool offered by eastern buyers. They have money and can afford to put their clip in warehouse and await the upward movement in the mar ket. Soles, while few in number and small in quantity, indicate that fair prices will rule later/ The Eugene Register says that wool is selling at 17c a pound, but gives no details as to sales. The Register very truth fully remarks that it has been a long time Many Of Our Customers Have Been Buying "DEMENTS BEST" FLOUR From us during the past eight years. As an extra inducement to those who are unfamiliar with this superb brand of Flour and whom we desire to become customers for it, we will, for a limited time, make the following price: $3-95 per Barrel. $1.00 Per Sack. This is fully 50 cents per" barrel below its actual market value. Every sack guaranteed. If not satisfac tory, money back. Better order at once. • • • Cooper SLevy, Wholesale and Retail Grocers, Seattl...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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