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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1905

fis the very best field corn for the Northwest. It will cost you a little more than the ordinary ETT>3*I!I?KIMIIBM3BMSISBBEIi 2nd, but it is worth a heap more. Try a small lot this year and be convinced. Sent prepaid, |Mlls9ll|jyl|A3|23JUyKH||llg9 pit.,' 10c.; lb., 20c; 100 lbs, by freight, $8.00. E^BBffffißßnfflnHß^l»l«yy»<>l*^TFll^> M Our 110 page 1905 catalog- of seeds and plants sent free on request. ■UKssWhlllsßßVHaUkKMlsMkßßßSßMAU&^U^vsisM^k^k^r HORTICULTURAL NOTES. (Continued from Page Five.) writer that this solution might not be quite strong enough. So we have been accustomed to using the stronger so lution. We know beyond the shadow of a doubt that the stronger solution will kill every scale it touches. I have met persons here in Washington who told me that they had not been en tirely successful in killing the San Jose scale with lime-sulphur wash. I do not understand this, for we have treen repeatedly successful with this prep aration. A good deal depends,...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1905

14 LIVE STOCK Ring-bone and Spavin. (C. L. Barnes.) Since olden times the term "ring bone" has been used to indicate an enlargement around the coronary joint. This enlargement is hard, being a growth of bone, and in many cases forms a complete ring, hence the name. A ring-bone has a tendency to continue growing, and in rare cases attains the size of a man's hand. The causes are conditions which favor sprains, such as fast driving over hard or uneven roads, unequal paring of the hoof, thus causing the weight to be unequally distributed in the joints, and severe labor in early life. In addition to these may be men tioned blows, bruises, or any injuries to tendons, ligaments, or joints. There is no doubt that colts inherit a pre disposition to ring-bones. Just as soon as the covering of the bone is bruised a liquid is poured out in the region of the injury. This in flammatory liquid hardens and forms the uneven growth known as ring bone. If the covering of the bone con tinues to be inf...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1905

Wood Island, we have a herd of cat- I c valued at about $900. They are i arged with all food purchsed or oduced by labor for them, and cred id with their produce (milk at 25c. gallon; meat at market price), and tneir account shows a gain of $500 for last year. Wool Prices High. Walla Walla sheep men anticipate record breaking price for their wool i lip this year. The extreme dry weath , ■ which has prevailed in that section lias entirely exhausted the pasturage of the lowlands, and in the mountains ihe usually light snow fall has cut down to the minimum a source for -razing purposes that can nearly al ways be depended upon. Some of the wiser sheep ranchmen are beginning to consider the question of producing early lambs, which is done by means of sheds built in the big pastures close to the home ranch, [v some of these establishments lamb- ing is already going on for the ewes were bred to begin yeaning by the middle of March. We know one man who built sheds enough to lamb 3,000 ewes ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1905

16 The Tubular WILLDOIT / 4 ''■^^MJfc^M^^r^SSS&i; What more can we say? This fully covers the ground. Now, Mr. Dairyman, I ';'-;4rTFmgTiM BHwßlli'nff'lffiT it is up to you to make the move. You say that you would like to try some other make I '■» „ V^^^^^B^Mwßnlli^ l that someone has told you is better than the Tubular. All right, by all means try it. f :/^BJ^S^raRHBHHH|S^#3 But m doing" so do not be onesided. Give the Tubular a voice in the matter. It needs f- BC^frJlM -—^"MlßHßil^bl- but little attention, takes up but little space and it « will tell its own story without our K3&^ vJf wS^^^^^SS fit aid. We have placed Tubulars alongside of other makes several times this season and ' -'ISif they won out in every instance, and will do so in your case. We will give you the W"" TW^^JpS; ' W names and addresses of where these trials took place. You want a clean skimmer / " , '^iPP^W^^^Mfiff y firSt of of course' Well> THE TUBULAR WILL DO IT. You want one that is i 1 WSi^^wKS^...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1905

lrt I if* rtrtfi*X''TNi«rJ w *«Sg|Ai3r in t.I B3 I .^erwi 3A# B 1 1 P% if\ Ba 3* The Tubular WILLDOIT Jlll^ What more can we say? This fully covers the ground. Now, Mr. Dairyman, >^" *1^ • > -- ' it is up to you to make the move. You say that you would like to try some other make :'-%3&=^3ii *"'«''" ' -*•* ' • . that someone has told you is better than the Tubular. All right, by all means try it. r>W -'v^.- But in doing- so do not be onesided. Give the Tubular a voice in the matter. It needs ■ <£-■■> ■/W»-ti S^^^^^^sft^/- ; but little attention, takes up but little space and it will tell its own story without our ''^y%'' ■ : ■■•{r|;.V^lS^^i^d^Sr. aid. We have placed Tubulars alongside of other makes several times this season and *^ i ™| • they won out in ever instance, and will do so in your case. We will give you the ffm ~*"lfflf{ names and addresses of where these trials took place. You want a clean skimmer M%'^^^%- first of all of course. Well. THE TUBULAR WILL...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1905

THE RANCH . VOL. XXII. NO. 8. BARGAINS IN Mill and Mining Machinery S ' ' *- ' \ HFPF yfr SECOND AYE. SO. \ IILI^L a LL _ v =r\k =\s\ RIGHT *."— _sy_-> <f^>tel |w| |<o| . HFDF ORADESAoM AYE. nCKC 6TYLES^<rpmv~^yw\jr prices \s^^\tnS\lUM\lK -&mW prices \%v\ m igiiEr P^n<sr o^o assasssss^ssals V^ >H FIRST E AYE. SO. A* I *>/ \~lflFl3l liillllil li lilT Occidental Avc, \^_lU_J >^Mg!J? L == JiJ L±_ SEATTLE With a Full Line of UP-TO-DATE VEHICLES Including the Celebrated Babcock Happy Thoughts; Mitchell Farm, Spring and Delivery Wagons; Agricultural Implements. Wholesale and Retail. Come and see us—if you can't come write. MITCHELL, LEWIS & STAYER CO. 213 OCCIDENTAL AVENUE, SEATTLE SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, APRIL 15, 1905. 50c per Year; 5c the Copy.

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1905

THE RANCH A Journal of tm Land-and the Home in the New West L. XXII. \< ». - BARGAINS IN Mill and Mining Machinery s' -" J - J \ HFPF yfr SECOND AYE. SO. \ IILIXL _____ y^ ...•-"-1 r^~\ r\ WE ARE, /^o W >-Lf™L_J'°i j^L—.. HFPF GRADES /</, a<^ A avi:. "LRL STYLES^' I '" •" *^!l%\ a w S^ -O \ \ // \a. «^!>s^ iH \\ r <^' \o i Izl ! IZi -«£MN§ PRICES VN&r /-v^• ,* rrr~mor~" i *™*> \ < ra~' ni ry rn;ivE>i3 V\^\ /*^ &* l\ h-^ 'central <§g O JS^I k LLI I 1! I^l r™Hyl§§l /IS 1 Xt^ y FIRST ? AVL Si 4h*l^ X" Hill 2 r Will 12 [ II IT Occidental Aye., V-J — > L-e-^j ?i- ,_. |^ ? SEATTLE With a Full Line of UP-TO-DATE VEHICLES Including the Celebrated Babcock Happy Thoughts; Mitchell Farm, Spring and Delivery Wagons; Agricultural Implements. Wholesale and Retail. Come and see us—if you can't come write. MITCHELL, LEWIS & STAYER Ca 213 OCCIDENTAL AVENUE, SEATTLE SKATTLE. \V.\sill\«, l» -\. .\I'!;M. IT, I<)D5 50c, per Y<\i v . "■

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1905

2 More About Strawberry Nomencla- ture. (C. E. Flint, Blame.) In (he April Ist number of The Ranch F. A. Cowell has an article in which he refers several times to state ments made by an "originator" and also criticises him for those state ments. In the first place he refers to an article that said "originator" had in the Northwest Horticulturist, in which the statement was made that the Kansas was a perfect blooming sort. Well, I did say it, for I am the party he means. When I wrote that article I was thinking more of the point I wished to bring out than of the fact in xegard to the strawberry bloom. The point I wished to make was that it made a difference even with perfect blooming sorts by the side of what variety they were planted. I do know that the Kansas is imperfect, and I also know that it makes a great difference what variety is used to pollenize it. With us the Kansas was pollenized by several different varieties and was still not a valuable berry. Accident ally a neighbor...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1905

THE RANCH Office: 376 Col man Building: MILLER FREEMAN Editor and Proprietor Associate Editors F. WALDBN, H. L. BL.ANCHARD MRS. S. O. WEBSTER. Issued the First and Fifteenth Each Month Subscription, in advance, one year 50 cents; six months, 30 cents. If on time, subscriptions will be $1. Seattle subscrib ers are required to pay $1.00 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscriptions. Oood commissions and sal aries paid to hustlers. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notified in wr'ting. by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning; the paper will not answer as we cannot find it nn our list from the name alone on the paper. We must have both name and ad dross, and all arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expira tion Is shown on your paper by address label containing your name. Falling to receive the paper regu...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1905

4 HORTICULTURE r. WALDEN It seems from the papers that Cali fornia has a new insect pest that is proving serious. They call it the "thrip." It is present in the Santa Clara valley about San Jose and no where else yet. I have not beenable to find a description of this insect but from what I have seen in the fruit papers of that state I learn that it attacks the fruit buds of the prune, peach, apricot and cherry. I judge it does this before the bloom appears. In some cases the damage seems to be slight but in others it results in the entire destruction of the crop. One man in reporting to the California Fruit Grower says: "Last year in a 45-acre patch of prunes I gathered only 60 boxes of fruit, the damage be ing due to thrips. In the past few days I have seen whole prune orch ards that will not bloom." The pest is a new one and so far as I can learn no one has yet found out how to suc cessfully combat it. But we may con fidently expect that such men as Woodworth and Clarke, who have ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1905

the carrying of the pollen of one flower to another. There are two es sential parts in every perfect flower —the pistils and the stamens. There are some subdivisions but these need not be considered now. The stamens produce pollen and are often called the male parts of the flower, while the pistils receive it and are called the female parts of the flower. The pis tils must receive pollen or the fruit will not develop. Now, in a perfect flower, as already stated, both pistils and stamens are to be found. Where this is the case and the pollen from the same flower falls on the pistils— (hat is pollenation, but it is not "cross pollenation." A flower that can pro duce its own pollen is called fertile, but when it does not and the pollen must come from some other flower, it is said to be sterile. Some flowers produce pollen but not enough. Such are not absolutely sterile but do lack in fertility. There are more of this kind of flowers than we are aware of. Here is need of cross pollenati...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1905

« THE DAIRY License for Retailing Milk. A Whatcom county reader asks if it is necessary to "get a permit to sell milk in town to be retailed out." The question is not entirely clear, but, tak ing it literally, we presume the cor respondent wants to know if a man liv ing outside the city limits, keeping cows and selling milk to a dealer or peddler in the city, must have a per mit to do so. So long as he furnishes milk to one party and does not attempt to peddle it out himself he need not secure a permit. The man who takes the milk and sells it from house to house must secure a permit or license from the city before he can proceed legally. The same correspondent asks if there is a state dairy inspector in Washington. The duties of such an official have devolved upon the state dairy and pure food commissioner heretofore, and the present incumbent is E. A. McDonald, whose office is at 58-59 Downs block, Seattle. If our cor respondent will write him and state fully what he wants to know,...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1905

[ e nt grass or other forage plants stim ulate the production of milk much „,ore than the same forage would if tod to cows after being dried. It is die same way with silage, for silage contains all the natural juices of the plant, and it stimulates the production of milk just the same as though the plants were cut fresh and green in ihe field for the cows. Cows should never be fed exclusive ly on silage. They need some dry for age to go with it; they need a variety. Besides this, silage is a carbonaceous food and needs some more nitrogen ous food to go with it, to make a well balanced ration. About 30, or at most, 4ii pounds a day of silage is as much as should be fed to each cow. It should be fed from the top of the silo, hiking off about two inches in depth from the entire surface each day, for, ii it is long exposed to the air, it will ue damaged. If the feeding com mences immediately after filling the silo —and this is a good way to do there will be no damaged silage at all. Car...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1905

8 HOUSEHOLD MBS. 8. O. WKBBTEK Send communications for this department to Mrs. 6. Q. Webster, 259 Colman Block, Seattle, or direct to The Ranch. All ques tions will be carefully answered; contribu tions for publication are welcome. The Monotony of Country Life. When 1 was a young girl 1 lived in a small inland Facihe coast town, i mougnt it was a terribly narrow life, thai i liad no opportunities; Uiat it was -pokey and that 1 was 'vege tating, lam sorry that 1 did not Know at the time tnat it was one oi the oest growing times oi my lite. 1 read all me good books i could get hold ot; 1 practiced vocal and instru mental music, trying to do things well. 1 belonged to a little club where all the girls were trying to learn things aoout writers —1 learned how to sew and cook, and when 1 look back on how wide awake all the young people were, how they read the magazines, how quick they were to all try together any new study and new occupations; it makes me almost cry to think 1 did not enj...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1905

Chapped Skiii: Equal parts Of glycerine and water mixed together i and a lew drops rubbed over the 1 uands and lace aiter wasuiug, but be! lore drying, will greaily Improve rough skin, and keep it In good con dition. Kheuniatisni: Lemon juice added 10 milk until it curds and these curds then bound upon the parts swollen from rheumatism will bring relief. Answers to Correspondets. Bride—A pretty hat lor traveling I would be a brown straw polo turban trimmed with loops of ribbon in the back. This is a new turban, straight] up and down and perlectly round in^ siiape. It is just a collar box and ( rather trying, but very stylish. As your lace is slender and not long, i ■ think you would look well in it. Then ' mere is a flaring brimmed hat, with the brim bent to make three points, I which is very pretty trimmed with; quills, and perhaps you would like that better. 1 would get a light weight tobacco brown broadcloth, made with a pleated skirt and a little jacket. 1 A pretty brown silk wa...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1905

10 POULTRY H. L. BLANCHARD Communications for this department are Kolicited. Personal experiences details* and questions prove of great benefit. Write to H. L. Blanchard at Hadlock, Wash., or direct to The Ranch, Seattle. Diseases of Pigeons. (By E. L. Reber.) A man who has a small squab plant in eastern Washington wants to know the cause of canker and whether or not there is a cure for it*. Practical squab breeders of years of experience have wrested with this disease for years, but have never been able to definitely ascertain the cause. The disease will come up at times in the best regulated lofts, although birds that have their liberty seem to escape it pretty well. T!»e disease is caused by filthiness, some writers say, but that is answered by others who state that in the cleanest and most careful ly conducted lofts they hava seen canker in its worst form. Keep your lofts in the very best of condition, see that your birds get pure water, plenty of salt, charcoal, oyster shell, g...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1905

BREEDERS' CARDS T«o Cents a Word Each Insertion. Special Rate by the Year. ■ <)R SALE —Buff Rock eggs, $1.25 per set ting. Q. E. Munn, Turn water, Wash^ BUFF ORPINGTON EGGS for hatching, at $2.50 per fifteen. Thomas Boundy, Kent \V ash. ' n\RK BRAHMAS are the best for all pur poses. Eggs $2 for 13; $3 for 26; pure blood. W. A. MarUn, JWash. (4TALOGUE FREE of the best Brown, White and Buff Leghorns, Black Mlnorcas, B P. Rocks and Buff Cochin Bantams. Fred A Johnson, 518 S. 35th St., Tacoma, Wash. THOROUGHBRED White Rock eggs for hatching, $1.00 per 13; excellent livers; satisfaction guaranteed. Miss Mary B. Bowen, R. F. D. No. 1, Renton, Was h. , SHOEMAKER'S White Plymouth Rocks are guaranteed to please you. Farm raised; bred exclusively for six years. Eggs $1.50 v»pr 13, $2.50 per 26. Your money back If not satisfied. S. W. Shoemaker, R. F. D. No, 2, Garfield, Wash TRY IT NEXT TIME Mlp Shoi^t Line and union Pacific The Short Route to all points East. See Salt Lake and Denver—lt c...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1905

12 THE FIELD The Winter Killing of Clover. In many sections where the raising of clover is carried on extensively farmers often find, after a winter has passed, that (heir clover has died through what is known as "winter killing." In some parts of the mid dle west the cause was generally attributed to the severity of the win ter, acting upon the soil in freezing and destroying the afe of the clover roots. This matter came to the atten tion of Prof. W. J. Spillman, agrostol ogist of the department of agriculture, through an inquiry in Wallace's Farm er, of Dcs Moines, lowa, and he took it upon himself to give the readers of that paper some information which was not generally known in coiXnec tion with the winter killing of clover. Prof. Spillman's article is reproduced below, and The Ranch would suggest that those who have clover patches which do not seem to be doing well at this time should examine them and see if the fungus mentioned by the professor exists in their fields. Prof. S...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1905

S per cent, phosphoric acid and 10 per ' cent, potash should be used. This should be sown broadcast at the rate o f i,OOO lbs. per acre. If the land has be cii in a high state of cultivation ,)],» commercial fertilizer may replace t ho barnyard manure. Onion soil. l iowe ver, cannot be too rich. The most successful growers use, in addition to the above, from 250 to 500 lbs. per ac re of nitrate of soda, applied broad cast in three or four different applica tions during the season. The cost „f growing and cultivating onions is V ( y high, and it must be borne in mind that it costs no more to cul tivate a crop that yields 800 bushels per acre than it does to cultivate a crop that yields only 300 bushels. When land is once in good condition onions may be grown on it from year to year. Seed should be sown as early in the spring as the land can j be worked, as it is very hardy. If intended for hand cultivation sow in rows 12 to 14 inches apart, and if for horse cultivation about 30 inche...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1905

14 LIVE STOCK Prof. Coffey on Sheep. At the recent stockmen's conven tion at the Illinois College of Agricul ture Prof. W. C. Coffey, instructor in the sheep department of that institu tion, said in his address: "A review of the sheep markets for the past year shows that prices have been very satisfactory to sheep growers and feeders. Production has been far short of demand, as exemplified by the short age in lamb feeding lots. While prices have been good, the range between the tops and culls has been very wide, and the necessity for good breeding and feeding is more manifest than ever. Most American farmers can profita bly handle a flock of sfteep, but he should maintain ewes which will pro duce first-class market lambs. Such a flock of ewes should be strong in con stitution and show general thrift; they should be deep in body, well sprung in rib and specially long, to provide room for the growing lamb; they should show quality and freedom from coarseness about the face, head and n...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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