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Title: Princeton Union, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 15,376 items from Princeton Union, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 24 March 1881

XV"*"f ,t-f GOSSIP FOB THE LADIES. Tbe Tongue of tne maid of Athens. Maid of Athena, we must part! Tour will is strong, your temper's tart And, when I go and when I come, Tour tongue swings like a pendulum. Hear my prayer before I go, Remember 'tis my last request, And, if you can for an hour or BO. Keep it still and let me rest By those banged locks all unconftned, Blown all about by every wind By that curled nose all out of joint, Like an interrogation point, Check that tongue's eternal flow. Oh, heed, I beg, this one behest, And, if you can for an hour or so, Keep it still and let me rest. By those lips that never close By those crossed eyeswhich daunt their foes By my bald head, so prompt to tell What Words can never speak so well, Tour tongue is darting to and fro Tou pour forth words like one possessed But, if you can for an hour so, Please keep it still and let me rest. Maid of Athens, I am goneI Ill be at peace when I'm alone. Yet, though I fly to Istambol, Tour strident ton...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 24 March 1881

Lifijht MY WrNOWJD-IVT. MBS. MART MAPE8 DODGE. Over my window the ivy climbs, Its roots are in homely jars But all day long it looks at the sun, And at night it looks at the stars. The dust of the room may dim its green, But I call to the breezy air 'Come in, come in, good friend of mine! And make my window fair." 80 the ivy thrives from morn to morn, Its leaves all turned to the light And it gladdens my soul with its tender green, And teaches me day and night. What though my lot is in lowly place, And my spirit behind the bars All the long day I may look at the sun, And at night look out at the stars. What though the dust of earth would dim There's a glorious outer air That will sweep through my soul if I let it in, And make it fresh and fair. Bear God! let me grow from day to day, Clinging and sunny and bright! Though planted in shade, thy window is near, And my leaves may turn to the light. A PYRAMID OF CABBAGES. [From Harper's Weekly.] "Why, where are you going, Isabel Eastman* ...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 24 March 1881

I Zf4 THJB IFOBLD SHALL JEKD "XJT 1881." DORA BSAD GOODAXE. To stranger, follower, or friend, In this perpetual round of strife, Of life In death, of death in life, Tha world shall really reach its end. Although it never shift within Its endless circle round the sun, Six thousand years ago begun, Yet daily shall the world begin. In health or plague, in war or peace, Despair or hope, abroad or home, At last for each the end shall come, For each the world forever cease. And even so, in peace ov war, In chamber noble or forlorn, The world for Wm most newly born, Shall be renewed forevermore. For this our prophet and her kin, The world was ended long ago, But for the strong, the steadfast, The waiting world may yet begin! -Ms lo! WEDDING GUESTS. An Episodeof PioneerLife in Colorada. I. All the hills were melting in the opal dimness of the soft October haze, through which, among the pines, aspen groves shone like yellow flames. The air, in its mingled brightness and vigor, rekindled that...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 24 March 1881

BBOTHER BARTHOLOHIEW, Brother Bartholomew, working time, Would fall into musing and drop his tool* Brother Bartholomew cared for rhyme More than for theses of the schools For gatr. or losing, for weal or woe, God made him a poet, long ago. At matins he sat, the book on his knees, And his thoughts were wandering far, I wis: The brotherhood chanted the Manies, /While he had no praying to do but this: I: Watching through arched windows high The birds that sailed o'er the morning sky. At complin hour, in the chapel dim, He went to his stall and knelt with the rest And oft, on the wings of the evening hymn, Would his BOUI Host out to the night's fair breast, And ever to him the starry host Flamed bright as the tongue at Pentecost. A foolish rhymester and nothing more: The idle fellow a cell can hold 80 judged the worthy Isidor, Prior of ancient Nithiswold Yet somehow, with dispraise content, Signed not the culprit's banishment Meanwhile Bartholomew went his way. And patiently wrote In hi...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 24 March 1881

FACTS FOB THE CURIOUS. THE skin contains more than 2,000,000 minute openings, the outlets of sweat glands. THE ancients believed that emeralds worn in a ring protected the wearer from dysentery, epilepsy and. malignant fe vers. The occult power of the gem was supposed to be increased by engraving some astrological device upon it. WHEN "Pickwick" was first published in numbers it was for a time a failure. Of 1,500 copies of each of the first five parts sent to various parts of Great Brit ain, there was an average sale of fifty copies a part. It was not until after the introduction of Sam Weller that the work became popular. THE size attained by icebergs is some times prodigious. From measurements made on one Dr. Haves estimated it to contain about 27,000*000,000 feet, while its weight must have been not less than 1,000,000,000 tons. It was grounded in water nearly half a mile in depth. What, then, must have been the thickness and the size of the glacier from which this mass had been ...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 24 March 1881

ANNUAL FINANCIALSTATEMEN OF THE RECEIPTS EXPENDITURES -OF flflZZJE Z^GS COUNTY /Vu POU THE YKAB ENDIMO February 28tli, 1881. Feb. 28,1880. Balance in coun ty treasury, all funds... .1 Total taxes collected during the year: State taxes County taxes, interest and costs, Princeton town taxes 44183 road taxes 1091 53 Green bush town taxes road taxes Milo town taxes road taxes, Special school district No. 1. 1149 05 658 90 3575 66 61 74 143 93 69 28 16 40 725 44 39 36 90 17 59 19 4 26 24 72 19 40 286 47 7 64 66 19 435 57 3 Building fund, 4.. 5.. 6.. 7.. 1.. 3.. 5.. 6., County poor fund Couuty road 142 20 Received of State treasurer, school fund 670 50 Received of S. L. Staples 806 49 Received of Bank of Princeton, interest on deposits 27 89 Keceived of J. L. Cater, for re demption fund 38 20 $10587 27 Feb. 28,1881. Balance in county treasury $ 955 24 Feb. 28,1881. Paid State treas urer during the year.. County orders, warrants, probate orders and juror's certifi cates canceled 3705 00 Pa...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 31 March 1881

N, MAIN STREE1 %*$- Jft-A Spring Opening. We are Now Getting In Our Spring and Summer Goods. We Have a Large Stock of as FINE GENT'S CLOTHING As Can be Found this Side of St. Paul, and at Low Prices. WE HAVE SOME CHEAP AND NOBBY SUITS FOR YOT'N^ MEN. IN THE BOOT AND SHOE LINE We Have the Finest Display of Nice Goods Ever Shown in Princeton. Have Ladies" French Kid Boots, in Button and Side Lace, also French Calf. Pebble Goatee and Cheaper Grades. OUR LADIES' AND MISSES' LINE Of Empress Ties, Newport Button and Tie Shoes Cannot be Excelled. Ladies Who Want a Fine Boot or Shoe Can Find Them at Our Stote, Without Sending to Minneapolis for Them. We Would Respectfully Invite the Ladies to Call and Examine Our i^oods. as We are Confident the Goods Will Please All. Wfc HAVE A FULL STOCK OF DRY GOODS AND GROCERIES And Everything the Farmers Require, and Still Buy and Pay the Highest Cash Prices for All Kinds of Farmers' Produce. We Shall Still Try to Keep up the Reputation of Our Store and...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 31 March 1881

ht Wxwnitm ^luiou. R. C. DUNN, Publisher. Terms:$2.00 per year in advance. CURPwENT TOPICS. R. D. L. MOODY is going abroad during the autumn. Mr. Moody can find a number of fields ripe for the harvest in the old country. THE late Lewis Clapp, of Lee county, Illinois, bequeathed $150,000 for the establishment of an agricul tural college. O. W. Clapp, of Chicago, a son of the legatee, has secured the setting aside of the will. 4 Dr. GEORGE LEW IS of Evansville, Ind., has married his mother-in-law, Mrs. Jane Dyson, of Lincoln, 111. He had previously married two of her daughters. They are bound he shall not go out of that family. TnE Charleston News has apparently seen the folly of longer kicking against the pricks, and says: If the south wants the federal government to be its friend, and treat the south as it does other sections, the south ern people themselves must manifest a national spirit." ANOTHER addition to the inquiry regaicling the origin of the word bliz zard is made by the C...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 31 March 1881

THE DEAD CZAR. Graphic Description of the Impos ing Funeral Ceremonies. A Pageant Unsurpassed fer Splendor and Os tentation. The last sad rites were paid to the memory of the murdered Alexander at St. Petersburg, 1 March 22. George, Augustus Sa'a telegra h= the following regarding the Im losing spl iy: I have just been a spectator of one of the mo&t magnificent, most impressive and most patriotic pageants on which in the oirs of a lengthened career, ac customed to the pomp and vanities of re gality, from royal bridals and feasts to royal funerals, I have ever been privileged to set eyes on Three cannon fired from the fortress iirected the various mourners to get ready to take their places. A similiar salvo about midday gave the signal to start. When the sable standard, bearing in white the initials of the MURDERED MONARCH, was unfurled over the fortress the artillery began tiring minute guns and all the bells in the city began to toll. The whole route was lined by troops of the ...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 31 March 1881

CONQUEST OF TEXAS. The Famous Characters who Met on the Mexican Border in 1884A Remarkable Story of the Rescue of Vickshnrg from Cat Throats. From the Philadelphia Times. Histojry' furnishes no more romantic story tljah the conques^ of Texas. A sgjieme born in the brain of a vision ary, natnlred by the desperate and reckless ambition of a handful of adventurers, and consummated by victory of an undisciplined rabble over trained troops, led by a veteran and skilled commander, its fruit to day is seen in a territory which in ex tent and resources rivals an empire, and which is now on of the most im portant and progressive states of the Union. In dealing with this subject, orjd in giving my reminiscences of the principal actors the drama it will be understood that I am Kistorical ot attempting anything like a sketch of the wresting of Texas from Mexican domination. It is rather my purpose to recall some of the events connected with that brief but wonderful struggle to contribute a page...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 31 March 1881

How the Assassins of Abraham Lincoln Were Tracked by the Provost Marshal of the District of Colombia. The Trail Followed Through Dense Swamps, Across Riven, and into the Enemy's Country. fhe Part Played by Booth's Crutch in the His* tory of His Pursuit and Capture. Gen. O'Beirne, Marshal of the Dis trict of Columbia in 1865, at the time of President Lincoln's assassination, publishes a series of chapters giving the hitherto unknown details and in terests connected therewith. After de scribing the immediate incidents con nected with the death of the martyred President, Gen. O'Beirne gives the particulars of the pursuit of the assas sins, of which as Marshal, he had con trol. With the determination and increas ing activity and vigilance which had actuated the provost marshal and his competent force of detectives from the very start, it was resolved to run down the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln, and his companion, without any delay. The different clues were turn rapidly exhaust...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 31 March 1881

MULTUM ITT PARVO. My love i just five-and-twenty. Pretty A matter of taste ween there be rosier cheeks, Tom Perhaps, too, an ampler waist. Bat what do yon need with the earth, Tom, When a hemisphere fills the bill? Tis the idiot calls for Niagara. When happiness lurks in a gilL Remember.the Titian Danae That girl in a thower of starsT Got a lion's physiqueit alarms me That she isn't behind the bars. I'd like to see Jove, the Immortal, Aroused from an afternoon nap, And brought face to face with the problem Of holding that girl on his lap I Then look at the Angelo frescoes There isn't a sea-dog that swims But would leap at the flattering prospect Of owning such mastodon limbs. And what of the Venus de Milo? Respects to the classical dame, Andmy wish that the rascal who found her Had broken a third of her frame. There might, in the ages agone, Tom, Before men attended the club, Be demand for these muscular females To govern their lords and the tub, And to wield in the gardens primeval...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 31 March 1881

PAWS FOR THE CURIOUS. FIFTY years ago tomatoes were called love apples and were considered poison ous. IT is calculated that sixty tons of steel are annually consumed in the manufact ure of steel pens. ONE of the wonder of the Cathedral of Cologne is the chapel of the three Magi, which contains the skulls of the "three wise men of the East," set in precious stones. THERE is no tide perceptible in the Mississippi river after you have passed up about thirty miles from its mouth, and the tide only rises from one and a-half to two feet at Balize. The num ber of tributaries (the Ohio, Missouri, and so on) which help to flood the Mis sissippi and swell its volume of water, gives it that downward current which overcomes every resisting influence, even the tidal. CATGUT, it is stated, was used in the earlier watches in place of chains, the latter, it would seem, being first at tached to such mechanisms in the golden egg or acorn-shaped watches of Hans Johns, of Konigsberg. Some of tins make...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 31 March 1881

ANNUAL FINANCIALSTATEMENT or ma RECEIPTS EXPENDITURES OK- MULE L4CS COUNTY VOil THE YIAR ENDIHG February 2$tli, 11. Feb. 28, 1880. Balance in coun ty treasury, all funds 1149 05 Total taxes collected during the year. State taxes 658 90 County taxes, interest and costs, 3575 66 Princeton town taxes 441 83 road taxes 109153 'Greenbush town taxes. road taxes... Milo town taxes.. road taxes Special school district No. Building fund, County poor fund 435 57 County road 142 20 Keceived of State treasurei, school fund 670 50 Received of S. L. Staples 806 49 Keceived of Bank of Princeton, interest on deposits 27 89 Keceived of J. L. Cater, for re demption fund.. 38 20 Paid $10587 27 Feb. 23,1881. Balance in county treasury $ 955 24 Feb. 28,1881. Paid State treas urer during the year. ..$ County orders, warrants, probate orders and juror's certifi cates canceled 3705 00 town of Princeton, town funds 539 03 town of Princeton, road funds... 1324 12 Paid town of Greenbush, town funds 81 60 Paid...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 7 April 1881

mmmm :i9 v..I THE VOL. V. Spnn MAIN STREET, A torpid liver and comes dull and clou" nits and pleasnres spirits. *t' penm W are No Getting in Our Spring and Summer Goods. W Have a Larg Stock of as FINE G!ENT?Se As Can be Found this Side of St. Paul, and at Lo Prices. W E HAVE SOME CHEAP AND NOBBY SUITS FOR YOUNG MEN. IN' THE BOOT AND SHOE LINE W Have the Finest Display of Nice Goods Ever Shown in Princeton. W Have Ladies' French Kid Boots, in Button and Side Lace, also French Calf. Pebble Goatee and Cheaper Grades. OUR LADIES' A Dealer in 3ENERAL MERCHANDISE:,, A JLarge Stcl of taple and Fancy Groceiies, General and Fancy Dry Goods, Notions, Men and Boys'Ready Made Clothing, Hats and Caps, Boots and Shoes, Glassware, China and Stoneware, Cigars and Tobacco. The Finest Stock of Choice. Candies, Confectionery and Fruits in Piinceton. Call and ?n SSy Fries?. So Wis to Stow Bosk Will Hot Be Undersold f^"AU Kinds of Farmers' Produce Taken in Exchange for Merchandise. D. A. CALEY Prescript...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 7 April 1881

Ibe Wnmtitm ^uion. R. C. DUNN, Publisher. Terms:13.00 per year in advance. CURRENT TOPICS. EVERY member of the imperial family of Germany is the possessor of a knowledge of some trade, and speci mens of their skill in the mechanical arts abound in the royal residence. THE total cost of the Afghan war to the British has been, so far, $97,500,- 000. This includes $22,500,000 ex pended in the construction of frontier railroads which will be useless for a long time to come. GARFIELD, Blaine. Allison and James Wilson were sworn in as members of congress for the first time in the darkest hour of the rebellion. Mr. Windom, who had served one term, at the same time was sworn in for his second term. DANIEL BASHIEL WARNER, the president of Liberia, is dead. He was born near Baltimore, Md., in 1815, of slave parents, who, however, obtained their freedom shortly after his birth. He had been in Liberia ever since and was a statesman of considerable ability. THE REV. MR. JASPER, of Rich mond, col...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 7 April 1881

'73 $- ise POLITICAL AGBICVIiTtnEtE. -H a fagot et fagotMoliere. The farmer through the freshly-furrowed land Btrode to and fro and at each step his hand Took from a Back and scattered on the plain Handfuls, to left and right, of wheaten grain. What is he doing 7" asked a ohild, whom there His tutor had led forth to breathe the air Between two lessons of arithmetic. "Just what thou see'st him do," the tutor, sick fcOf the child's frequent questions, peevishly Beplied to this one"sowing his field.' "Why?* That he may reap." What Corn," the tu tor saidr, 4 4 To make fo thee, child, black, unbuttered bread When thou hast misbehaved thyself.'^ The child, Somewhat abashed, but mill unreconciled To silentignorance, paused, blushed, and then Is sowing difficult V" he asked again. To which last question, vainly more than one* Belterated, not the least response The tutor deigned. Some days afterward, Flaying alone about the garden-sward. This child upon the gravel, with a stake Plucked from ...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 7 April 1881

KP/ XHB WAMILY RECORD. This notched stick, suspended here Beside the great hall door, Hides many a quaint and curious page Of unwrit family lore. It holds the record of our lives, Each notch a story tells, And in its mystic marks and signs Our family history dwells. 'Twas not as now, when we were young, Our schools were precious few, And also very far between Our county numbered two And fifteen miles in winter time Was rather far to go Bemembering that the winters then Were not devoid of snow. And so the schooling we obtained (Myself and husband Dick), Consisted all in marks and signs And notches ona stick. I blush not here to own this fact, The blame, if blame there be, Must all attach to circumstance, And not to Dick and me. This preface on the end, we notched Just sixty years ago, Where we had built our little hut And moved in, through the snow. The worldly wealth we then possessed, I'll not essay to hide, Consisted in a yoke of steers, A log-chain, ax and slide. "But we were you...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 7 April 1881

BEQQINQ AWAY. There was an old shoemaker, sturdy as steel, Of great wealth and repute in hisday, Who, if questioned his secretofJuck to reveal, Would chirp like a bird on a spray, It isn't so much the vocation you're in, Or your liking for it," he would say, As it is that forever, through thick and through thin, You should keep up a pegging away." I have found it a maxim ofvalue, whose truth Observation has proved in the main And which well might be vaunted a watch word by youth In the labor of hand and of brain For even if genius and talent are cast Into work with the strongest display, You can never be sure of achievement at last Unless you keep pegging away. There are shopmen who might into states men have grown, Politicians for handiwork made, 8ome poets who better in workshops had shown. And mechanics best suited in trade But when once in the harness, however it fit, Buckle down to your work night and day, Secure in the triumph of hand or of wit, If you only keep pegging away. ...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 7 April 1881

THE DBOV6HT I N TURKEY* There was in Turkey, years ago, A fearful drought as all must know. The Turks to Allah prayed for rain. On hands and knees, but all In vain. Of weather-prophets quite a score "Were strangledstill it wouldn't pour. At last the Turks met in despair, When one arosethe wisest there. And said: We need more help, we do Let's start the Jews a-praying, too!" No sooner said than done. That day Each Jew was ordered out to pray, But, like .the Turks, tney prayed in vain The sun grew hotter, and the ground "Was burned tor miles and miles around. The thirsty Turks, despairing more, Assembled as they had before. If this keeps on," the wise man said, "In my opinion, we'll be dead. But there's another card to play: Make all the dogs of Christians pray." At once each Christian was at work A-praying, guarded by a Turk, Who on the Prophet's beard had sworn To kill each dog of them by morn Unless it rained. So all that night The Christians prayed with main and might. The morning...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
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