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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE CASTOR BEAN. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

THE CASTOR BEAN. The castor bean crop of this State will be much larger this year than ever before. The conditions of the soil and climate of California seem to be particularly favorable for its culture; and there is scarcely any other crop which can be made so sure or profitable with so small an outlay of capital. The plant throws a tap-root to a considerable depth, thereby rendering it much less liable to be affected by drouth than the common bean, or, in fact, almost any other product of the garden or field. Before a person enters largely into its culture, however, he should test the same thoroughly, on a small scale. In fact this rule should be applied to all new products of the farm, or such as the farmer may not be practically acquainted with. The San Jose Mercury gives the following experience of Mr. Frank Kingston, of Santa Clara, in the culture of this bean, which will be found interesting, if not useful to all who are about entering upon its cultivation:—Mr. K. planted abo...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE HOME CIRCLE [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

THE HOME CIRCLE RY OUB LADY EDITORS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
"AS THE TWIG IS BENT THE TREE IS INCLINED." [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

"AS THE TWIG IS BENT THE TREE IS INCLINED." [Written for the Piikss.] BY MULL VAN. "Mamma" said Susie, "why did you look so stern, and speak so cross to little Eva this morning when you found her sitting under the breakfast table with the sugar bowl and a spoon eating sugar? She looked so funny with her face all smeared, and seemed so frightened to be found out, that I don't see how you could help laughing." "My dear little girl" said mamma, "we must not laugh at everything that seems funny, when the consequences of making light of such proceedings is so dangerous. Suppose I should take no heed of such funny little ways and my child should grow i up a pilferer and a thief, would not the fault rest upon my shoulders, who should j have taught her bettor by correcting her j sin before she seemed to realize the full extent of it ? Remember our greatest faults have but small beginnings, and if crushed in the outset their growth will be retarded till reason gains full sway. The contents o...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
BEAR YE ONE ANOTHERS' BURDENS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

BEAR YE ONE ANOTHERS' BURDENS. "Bear ye one anothers 1 burdens" softly it fell from the eloquent lips of the minister, floated down the dim old aisles where the sunlight lingered, as a fond benediction, rested in gold and crimson shadows, thrown from stained glass windows on the soft velvet, on the costly sable, on the rich feathers and rare old lace. But Hi' 1 sermon is over and there is a soft stir through all the church an unclasping of pearl and velvet-bound 1 ks, for this, dear reader, is a rich congregation — a very select congregation, and very suitable they should hear the text, "bear ye one anothers' burdens." And did they profit by it? yes, indeed! Yon can see that if you notice the plentiful supply of silver the beggars outside the door receive. What if the costly robes are swept aside by delicately gloved hands; money is money all the same, and that is all they (the beggars) ask. So the proud congregation go home satisfied; they have attended services; they have given to...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE LITTLE DRAWER. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

THE LITTLE DRAWER. There's a little drawer in my chamber Guarded with the tenderest cure, Where the dainty clothes are lying, That my darling never shall wear. And there, while the hours are waning, Till the house is all at rest, I sit and fancy a baby Close to my aching breast. My darling's pretty white garments! I wrought them, sitting apart, While his mystic life was throbbing Under my throbbing heart. And often my happy dreaming Breaks in a little Bong Like the murmur of birds at brooding, When the days are warm and long. I finished the dainty wardrobe, And the drawer was almost full With robes of tjio finest muslin, And robes of the whitest wool. I folded them all together, With a rose for every pair, Smiling, and saying, "Gem fragrant, Fit for my prince to wear." Ah, the radiant summer morning, So full of a mother's joy! "Thank God, he is fair and perfect, Mv beautiful, new-born boy!" Let him wear the pretty white garments I wrought while sitting apart; Lay him, so sweet and s...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
WOMANLY MODESTY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

WOMANLY MODESTY. Mao loves the mysterious. A cloudless sky, the full-blown rose, leaves him unmoved; but the violet which hides its blushing beauties behind the bush; the moon when she emerges from behind v .loud are t<> him sources of inspiration and pleasure. Modesty is to murk what shade is to figure in painting it gives to it boldness and prominence. Nothing adds more to female beauty that modesty; it sheds around the oountenanoe a halo of lighi which is borrowed from virtue. Jiotantists have given the rosy hue which tinges the cup of the white roses, the. name of "maiden blush." This pure and delicate, hue is the only paint Christian virgins should use, it is the richest ornament. A woman without modesty is like a faded flower diffusing an unwholesome odor, which the prudent gardener will throw from him. Her destiny i« melancholy, for it terminates in shame and repentance. Beauty passes like the tlowers of the albo, which blooms and dies in a few hours, bu...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
DOMESTIC ECONOMY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

DOMESTIC ECONOMY.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Healthful Economy in Bread. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

Healthful Economy in Bread. Many people who now use fine flour altogether, would employ unbolted flour universally if it could be as readily obtained as the former and perhaps a little cheaper, as they would thus bo able to oombine economy with the true principles of dietetics. Millers generally chargo as much for unbolted flour, as for that which is bolted; but there is no reason why they should do 80. Unbolted meal ought to be considerably cheaper per sack or barrel, than that which is subjected to extra labor, and diminution by having a large proportion of that which possesses the least pecuniary value taken from it. ]Jut there it a way to avoid this imposition—by simply buying the middlings (best shorts) and good bran which have been taken out by the miller, and mixing them together, in the same proportions in which they would exist if the wheat had been ground up without bolting. There is but little labor in mixing, while the cost of the mixture to make a given quantity of brea...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
How to Buy Meat. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

How to Buy Meat. Dr. Letheby gives the following description of good and bud meats. Avith which his duties as sanitary officer in the city of London have required him to be very familiar: Good meat is neither of a pale pinkish nor a deep purple tint. It has a marbled appearance, from a ramification of little veins of intercellular fat; and the at of tin 1 internal organs especially is firm, hard and suety, and is never wet, whereas that of diseased meat is soft and watery. The feel of healthy meat is somewhat elastic and hardly moistens the finger. Diseased meat is soft and wet. Good meat has but little odor, and this is not disagreeable; whereas diseased meat smells faintly cadaverous, (iood meat bears cooking without much shrinking or losing much of its weight; but bad meat shrivels up and boils to pieces; this is due to tho larger proportion of watery and gelatinous material, and the absence of fat and true muscular substance in the meat. Under tho microscope the fibre should be ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Delicate Hands. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

Delicate Hands. "Why don't my hands look and feel, as it would seem that the perfect Author of all things would have them V" —How many a young man and woman have asked this question; and are troubled to know why it is that some persons have such bloodless hands, perfect nails—so free from hang nails, as they are called —while their own hands look so much like duck's feet or bird's claws. All sorts of cosmetics, the most penetrating oils, rubbing and scouring the hands, pareing and scraping the nails, and cutting round the root of the nails, are resorted to, in hopes of being able to make their hands appear natural; but all avails nothing, and many a poor hand is made to perform all its manipulations incognito. About the piano, in the social party, in the house and in the street, the hand—the most exquisite, or what should be the most beautiful and useful part of the human frame —is gloved; and why? Because it is not fit to be seen. Now, we ai'e about to tell you of a positive cure. ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Soups. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

Soups. Generally the American people are not fond of soups; perhaps because they are seldom well made, and Avhen they are, they are often complicated and expensive, requiring much money, time and attention to prepare them. These difficulties are avoided in the following recoipts, and a few trials will enable any one of ordinai-y understanding, who will follow the directions, to produce cheap, wholesome and agreeable soups, without shins, knuckles, scrags, bacon or drippings. Pea Soup.—Put one pint of split peas, which have been previously soaked in cold water four hours, into two quarts of pure soft water. Distilled, or filtered rainwater is preferable when it can be obtained. Let them boil for one hour, then add one carrot, one parsnip, one turnip, two onions, ;i small head of celery and a little mint, all cut small, and boil the whole another hour. Strain the soup from the vegetables, and thicken it with a little Indian meal, previously mixed in cold water; boil the whole for ten ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Domestic Receipts. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

Domestic Receipts. Ointment to Soften the Hands. —One and a-Jialf pound of mutton tallow, one ounce of tallow, one ounce of camphor gum, one ounce of glycerine, melted; when thoroughly mixed put away to coal. Rub on at night. Toxotje Toast.—Take cold boiled tongue, mince it line, mix it with cream, and to every half pint of the mixture allow the well beaten yolks of two eggs. Place over the fire and let it simmer a minute or two. Have ready some nicely toasted bread; butter it, place it on a hot dish, and pour the mixture over. Send to table hot. A Good Dish may be made, for those who like pork, as follows: —Take slices of home-fed pork and set them over a good frying fire in the spider with a little salt. Core and quarter some nice tart apples and add them to the pork, covering the spider with a lid. Cook till all is of a nice brown and serve hot, with the apples spread upon the slices. To Preserve Figs.—Take the fruit when not quite ripe. Soak for ten or fifteen minutes in weak, w...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Mechanical Hints. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

Mechanical Hints. Gilders' Composition for Frames. — The composition at present in use is composed of best black glue, common resin and linseed oil. Some use resin oil, others boiled linseed oil. Nearly every manufacturer has a little change in the proportions. It is a useful material for many other purposes to which it might be applied were its mode of manufacture known. Take 10 lbs. of best black glue, boil it in the usual manner, but with very little water. It should be at least four times as thick as the glue used for general purposes. Take 0 lbs. of common resin, and pound to dust; add linseed oil, or resin oil, to form a thick paste with the dust; dissolve with heat, allow it to (tool to about 212°, then add the hot glue together; combine it well. Have sifted whiting prepared, and combine the whole as in making bread; form it into cakes, and allow it to cool; at any time by the application of steam or heat, this composition may be brought into use. Well Wokth Knowing.—lt is a ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
LIFE THOUGHTS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

LIFE THOUGHTS. Endeavor for the best, and provide against the worst. How to be Nobody.—Spend your leisure hours in a drinking saloon. The best humor is that which contains the most humanity. Life is hardly respectable when it has no generous task, no duties or affections that constitute an object for loving. In youth we should cultivate mind and character, that we may reap the ripened fruit thereof in old age. Heroes may destroy tyrants, but it is wisdom and law that prevent tyranny and oppression. In every pursuit, whatever gives strength and energy to the mind is favorable to the interests of knowledge and virtue. Whatever limits or enfeebles the power of the mind, is hostile to the best interests of human life. The best way to acquire the faculty of being at home in the best society, is to stay at home with one's wife and children. Kefined homes are the end of civilization. The work of all races for thousands of years is represented by the difference between a wigwam and a lady's...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
What is Life? [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

What is Life? As we sit at our table to-night, thoughts of the past, present, or future crowd upon our mind, and we naturally ask, what is life ? What is there in this world of sin and sorrow that should claim our attention, or cause us to have one wish to continue here ? We look around, and we behold suffering and scrrow; there lies the infant baby, who never committed one sin, writhing in pain; over it bends the kind mother weeping and feeling as none but a mother can feel. Yonder we hear a wailing which comes from around the couch of the dead. Bickness sorrow, anxiety, and fear stalk over the earth and meet us on every hand. Why should we not ask, what is life? and the answer comes from the heart, life is one continual scene of sorrow. But the grave awaits us, and in that house which God has prepared for all his suffering children the weary can find rest. What is a Man ? —No man is a man till he is tried; till he has passed through the ordeal: through deep water and scorching fir...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
KIND WORDS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

KIND WORDS. Editors Press: —In common with many others on the Pacific Coast, your readers in Stanislaus County hail with delight the advent of your new paper—the PACIFIC RURAL Press. It snpplies a want long felt on this coast; for all of US, it is an important step towards the advancement of practical knowledge and science in the departments of the field, the garden, and the barn; the orchard, the vineyard, the pasture, the dairy, and the poultry-yard. While it IS readily conceded that the various excellent periodicals on these subjects in the Eastern States, such as the American Agriculturist, of New York City, and others which might be named, contain much valuable information, for all who wish to see these branches of knowledge keep pace with the rapid advancement of other interests, in this age of steam and lightning, they certainty do not tupply the wants of our people of the west, as does your admirable journal, in which you so successfully make our special wants your particula...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SANTA CRUZ FARMERS' CLUB. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

SANTA CRUZ FARMERS' CLUB. Nothing of interest to the readers of the Piu'ss transpired at the last meeting OJ the Club; held at the Court House, on Saturday, April Ist. The Club passed tho, following resolutions which restores harmony among the members. Resolved, That the President may vote on all questions coming before the Club. The proposition to strike out the words "Any Farmer" and insert the words "Any Person" was adopted. Hereafter the Club will devote itself to discussing subjects pertaining solely to the agricultural interests of the county and State. I trust T shall be able to send you an interesting report next time. 80088 CoNANT. Seeds, etc., Wanted at the Dbpabthent or A(siu< ri/ruKE. —We have received a letter from Commissioner Capron, of the Department of Agriculture, at Washington, asking among other things, for reference to " parties in California who would furnish plants, seeds or cuttings for the propagation of the tea, olive or malagu grape." Many appli...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
NEW BOOKS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

NEW BOOKS. Pabm Imi'u'.mk.nts and Fabm Maohhtert, iindHi.' Principles <>f their Construction and l'w : with pimple and practical Illustrations of the Laws of Motion and Force n* applied <>n the Farm. With 887 Illustration* By John ■). Thomas. New York: Orange, Judd & Co., MB Broadway. Bvo. i>i>. 809. This publication contains very much of general interest and value while intended more ('specially for the farmer. It, commences with the leading principles of mechanics which are applied everyday by the farmer, and presents these in a simple and interesting form. They are important in teaching the reasons of success and failure, thai the practical agriculturist may not bo guided by random guessing. Then follow pages of excellent matter concerning farm implements. The practical, every day value of such a book as this is very great, and we cheerfully recommend it. It is by the possession of such knowledge as is ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Meteorological Observations. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

Meteorological Observations. At Sacramento, Oat,., BY THOfi. M. LOGAN, M. D. Permanent .Secretary of State Board of Health. IM. WM'tl" N., Long. 12r29'H"W. HightatLevee above mean low tide, at Ban Francisco, 71 feet. HtKht o lower Hurl'ace of mercury, 94 feet. The amount of cloudiness is designated by flares, 10 beinK entire cloudiness; ft. half cloudiness, il, entire clearneH-; and Intermediate numbers In proportion. The force of thn wind is also registered in the same manner; (I beinii a calm, 1 a very litflit breeze, and II) a hurricane. The means are derived from three daily reading! at 7 a. m., 2 v. m., nnd M P. M., in uniformity with the arrangement! of the Smithsonian Institute. * Thermometograph. t Rain. Bbmabks.—Although the weather of tin? week has been fraught with disappointment and dismay to the a«riculturist, on aOOOUnt of the fieroe, desiccating winds that have prevailed, we see no reason yet for despairing of an arerage harvest. The younKKrain is not so much injured ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Meteorological Report—San Joaquin Valley. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

Meteorological Report—San Joaquin Valley. Jtnin tablet for a portion of San Jonquin Valley. Prepared for the Pm-.Hs by J. \V. A. Wbiohx, from observation! since September, l«»iH, between Tiiolun.no and Merced lliverg, nine miles south of Empire City and tea miles cunt of the San Joaquln, in T. 5 s., R. 10 X., Mt. Diablo to meridian mid base line. Lat., 87« :)8 P N.j long., 120" 55' W. Height above Ml, about 100 feet. Months. 1868. 18». 1870. September 0.00 0.00 0.00 October Sprinkle 1.19 O.'J. r > November 0.95 0.49 0.32 December 2.83 O.'J9 1.89 Total for each year to Jan. 15t.... 3.78 2.G7 2.40 Months. 18G9. 1870. 1871. January 2.02 0.89 0.90 February 3.53 2.79 1.44 March 3.51 1.17 0.31 April 0.99 1.00 May 0.05 0.00 June 0.00 0.12 July 0.00 0.00 August 0.00 0.00 Total 15.11 8.C.4 ItKMABKH.-It will bo observed that the amount of rain, to April Ist, this seuson, is 5.11 inches, while to same date, 1870, it was 7.52; and to same date, 18C9, it was 13.47 inches. Yet so well ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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