ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Grenville Standard Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
8,145 results
"THE FINGER OF GOD." [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

"THE FINGER OF GOD." As King William III. of England, the Stadtholder of the Netherlands, was besieging Namur early in April, 1695, sundry soldiers from his army, through, the want which reigned in the camp, went marauding, though such a trans gression of the martial law had been forbidden on pain of death. Most of these marauders were caught by the country people and kill ed; only two of them reached the camp uhscathed, but they were sen tenced to death. They were both brave soldiers, and the General-in Chief wanted to save one of them, and thus commuted the judgment so far that they should be allowed to throw at dice for their life. On the morning appointed for the execution, the condemned were led to a drum, in order thereupon to cast the decisive throw, while at a few paces further the fatal pole already stood erect. Full of painful expecta tion, a group of officers, the regimental chaplain, and the executioner sur rounded the poor fellows. "With a trembling hand one of the cond...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WORLD'S LARGEST LIGHTHOUSE. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

WORLD'S LARGEST LIGHT HOUSE. The most important lighthouse at the present time, so far as actual operations are concerned, is the light of Heligoland, from the fact that it is centred in the very heart of the naval ■ war zone. Heligoland was ceded by Great Britain to Germany in 1890, in return for concessions made to Bri tain in East Africa. The Heligoland light is an electric one, and the most powerful in Ger many, and is claimed by the Germans to be the most powerful light in ex istence. The light consists of a clus ter of three revolving lights, having a lighting power of 40,000,000 candles, a magnitude of light which from fig ures alone is hard and difficult to re alise. The lights are on the search light principle, and the cluster is sur mounted by a single light of the same kind and size, that can be revolved independently and three times as fast as three lights. The single light is put into use in case of accident to the cluster of three. The electric I power is generated by ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BULLETS LIKE WAFERS FRENCH REPLY TO GERMAN GAS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

BULLETS LIKE WAFERS I FRENCH REPLY TO GERMAN GAS. i I A shell' which, showers razor-edged discs is the latest French answer to German inventiveness. It comes with in the category of shrapnel, and is thus within the rules of war. When ordinary shrapnel bursts, the "che misette" or outer casing is torn to fragments of varying sizes, which scatter with the shrapnel itself over an area that depends upon the force of the explosive contained in the shell. The new French shell is not shrapnel at all—it is a highly explo sive shell, the "chemisette" of which is thicker than the old type of shell, and constructed with a special kind of steel which does not break 'into fragments, but shivers into more than two thousand wafer-like pieces. A neutral observer from behind the German lines, who has communi cated the discovery to American pap ers, says a doctor showed him a piece he had taken from the body of a dead German. It was as thin as the thinnest kind of safety razor blade, and must have ac...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Cycling & Motoring. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

Cycling & Motoring. When the latest files left America great interest was being taken in the big motor cycle relay ride which was to take place across America from Washington to San Francisco, the despatch leaving the former city on July 3 8th. The schedule drawn np for the 39 relays into which the 3557 miles journey was being split, allowed 160 hours, or 6 days 16 hours, for the transcontinental trip. This gives an average for the full journey of about 22 miles an hour, which is practically the same speed at which the Australian motor cyclists carried j their despatch from Adelaide to Sydney (1149 miles) in the Dunlop Rubber Company's military despatch ride, held across the three States in 1912. Two motor cyclists were to take charge of the despatch over each relay, the ride pro gressing day and night without stop. A rehearsal test over all stages was to be held from ocean to ocean, a week previous to the big ride, so that all couriers would be well acquainted with their re...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A WAR CHANT. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

A WAR CHANT. O England! thy foe hath hated thee O England! they foe hath hated thee long, . And his hate is a deadly thing; It was held in his heart till its growth was strong, Now words have woven it into a song For little children to sing. It is hatred that fashioned shot and shell, And hatred hid death in the sea; In hatred the cannon have sounded a knell O'er the little homes where the peace ful dwell And the humble-hearted be. Thy foe hath swept the blue from the sky In a fury of smoke and flame; His guns are not stilled where the wounded lie, , He hath shown no pity to those who die For .the glory of his name. He sealed his hate with the 'blood of his men—• Oh, the young in their coats of grey They are cast aside, and in river and fen, Deep-hidden, where none, will find them again Till the last white Judgment Day. Now mirth is forgotten an'l joy is dead, The world hath accepted its pain; Still over the battlefields, newly red, The shattered ranks of an army are led In pomp and...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Complied With. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

Complied With. A very self-important little man ap proached a tall policeman one morn ing with indignation glistening in his eyas. "I demand to know," he said, in a firm voice, "why I am forced to re main on this side of the street when my business calls me to the other?" The policeman looked a trifle star tled for a second or so, but recover ing himself, he replied: "Well, who's keepin' you from go in' ?" , "The traffic, sir—the traffic of vehi cles; yet pedestrians are supposed to have the right of way." '"Well," gruffly responded the policeman, "what are you going to do about it?" "I am going to insist on my rights, sir," said the responsible citizen. "That's easy," said the man of law. "And see that I get them.' "That will be harder." "You are a public servant in the public pay and at the call of the pub lic. I therefore demand a safe pass age across this thoroughfare. It is your duty to see that my demands are complied with." The big policeman looked at the man, then, seeming t...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Both of One Mind. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

Both of One Mind. Mrs. Stormyweather, who had been engaged in a somewhat prolonged and heated dialogue with her husband, j beat a dignified retreat so soon as 5 she found she was getting the worst of the argument, and turned her at I tention to culioary matters as a balm i for her ruffled soul. J "Jane," she said, "I want you to put ! on your things at once, and go out Iand see if you can get me a plaice." "Yes'm," replied Jane, with alac Irity. "And while I'm about it I may as well look for one for myself, too, for I'm blest if I can stand the mas ter any more than you I"

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Obituary. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

Obituary. « : The funeral of the late Mrs Ann Dixon, who died at Skipton, took place at the Carngham Cemetery on 23rd inst. The deceased was 87 years old. The coffin-bearers were Messrs R. Dixon, W. Shaw, J. S. Douglas, and W. Murray. The Rev. R. E. Sannders officiated at the grave. James Kelson, of Linton, was the undertaker.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Are the Allies Really Winning? [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

Once more, in " Life " for August, Dr. Fitchett gives us a wonderful review of the fighting of the month in Europe and on the Sea. In the coarse of one section of this review Dr* Eitchett frankly ad mits that the month has been one of disappointments. In his usual vigorous and picturesque style, Dr. Fitchett then outlines the fighting of the month on both fronts and at Gallipoli. Having done so, he pro ceeds to point out the bright spots in the landscape and to analyse the disappoint ments. The result is that he shows us very clearly that in reality the balance during the month has tipped in the Allies favor. It is a practical and heartening pronouncement that gives the reader a wonderfully clear-eyed view of the war. Readers of this August issue of '• Life " will notice that the Editor is by no means devoting his entire space to the war ; on the contrary, we find such illustrated articles as " Morrissey of the Snakes," illustrated with some remark albe photographs, and telling some...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

The bride wasgowoed in nattier blue, With shoes arid toque of •' tango" hue The bridegroom, in a suit of brown;. Looked quite the smartest " sport " in town And while confetti filled the air. A tearful mater kissed the pair, And sobbed, " My love ! be always s ura To take your Wood's Peppermint Cure." ; g- - nn «• mmmm campaign. RUSK ARE WANTED I WHAT THE W0R1EN CABS ©0. The women of Australia have already done, and are doing, much splendid work in the way of raising war funds for various objects, and of supplying valuable equipment to our boys bound to' the front. Nor? an even greater and harder task faces them—to assist in stimulating enlistment. Yet that is what every woman of Victoria who realises her true duty to State and Empire must do to day, and do quickly and unflinchingly. While there are many who have given their husbands and sons to the great cause, there are many who are either indifferent or who shrink from making the great sacrifice. Yet in this stupendous life or de...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Skipton News. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 31 July 1915

* The following have enlisted from the Skipton and Streatham district H. F. Thompson, H. Pett. S. Caldwell, E. Marshall, E. Milleti, T. Mulholland, A. Croxon, J. VYalker, Alf. Smith, W. A. Morriss, S. Dangar, R. aud S. Cairns, !N. Wallace, B. Templar, W. Ferguson, J. M'Quire L. aud B. Hussey, and J. L. Barnden. Messrs J. M. 'Reid and E. Pittard are in the officers' instruction camp. The Skipton Masonic Lodge presented Mr Reid with a razor set in a suitably inscribed silver case. Mr R. C. Bell, of Mooramong, has presented the Red Coss Committee with n roll of flannel, oontaning 150 yards. Mr E. G. Austin, of Borriyalloak, has given a valuable Greener rifle to be raf fled in aid of the fund. The. Streatham school children raised £5 at a concert.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Grenvilleshire Council. THURSDAY, 5TH AUGUST, 1915. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 7 August 1915

Grenvillesfiire Council. Thursday, 5th august, 19151 Present—Crs Kennedy (president), I Clarke, Shepherd, Douglas, Vaughan, j Wallis, and Poynton, Nunn, and Blake ley. ^ TENDEBS. No. 38/15—Supply of 250 c. yds. quartz and 100 c. yds. surface gravel be tween Bull Inn and Sago Bill, Haddon. Da vies and Go. , ... £23 ,6 8 Alf. Nunn (accepted) .19! 19 0 H. J. Tudor 25 9 0 John Urch 32 0 0 W. Henderson ... 43 10 0 . No. 34/15—Supply of 150 c. yds. sur face gravel at Piggoreet. P.Nolan.. £21 0 0 J. Higgans ... ... 18 2 6 J. G. Allan (accepted) 18 0 0 John Urch 40 0 0 I P. Hynes 15 5 0 CORRESPONDENCE. From Country. Roads Board, stating that all contracts under the Act should be numbered consecutively.—Attended to. From same, in regard to extras and deductions on contracts.—Received. From same, stating tftat^rovlsidii' money on contracts shall be Sfixed oh a basis of 2-Jr per cent, of the contract amount.—Received. ;' From same, asking for a return of works carried out for the year ended J ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WEAK EYESIGHT. The Eyes Benefited by Army Training. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 7 August 1915

WEAK EYESIGHT. The Eyes Benefited by Army Training. Among the many "surprises'' whicn the war has revealed none has been more striking than the. one showing the enormous number of young men compelled to wear glasses on ac count of weak eyesight. Prior to the war no men who were under the necessity of wearing glasses were accepted in the Regu lar Army. With the formation of "Pals" battalions and other specially constituted corps, drawn in very large measure from the ranks of city workers of the middle class, aad used, for the most part, to desk work or other sedentary occupations, the rule prohibiting glasses was relaxed. As a consequence, many men who had become accustomed to wearing spec tacles or pince-nez, after passing the regulation Army tests to prove their sight was not defective, were allow ed to retain and continue the use of glasses. .The interesting sequel is that, after undergoing a few months' training, many of these young men find they can dispense altogether with any ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Saving the Battery. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 7 August 1915

Saving the. Battery. An incident (luring the fight of March 14 on the La Bassie road, in which a Welsh gunner, of the Royal Field Artillery, played a gallant part, is related by Sergeant Greenaway. "One of cur batteries," he says, "was going straight into the German lines* when the captain saw them. 'They must be warned at all costs,' he said, and asked for volunteers. Gunner P. Russell, 20th Battery, R.F.A., immed iately stepped to the front, and al though he was forty-three, the cap tain let him go. Jumping on a horse, Russell galloped over a ploughed field, with the German big uns send ing their shells in every direction. We thought every moment would be Russell's last, but he returned safe and sound, without a scratch, and saved the battery."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Aviation Heroes. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 7 August 1915

Aviation Heroes. Daring indeed was the feat per formed by Lieutenant George Ivan Carmichael, of the Royal Artillery and Royal Flying Corps, which won for him the D.S.O. It was on March 11 that he went up to reconnoitre. In spite of artillery and anti-aircraft guns, he came down as low as 120ft. and, dropping a bomb weighing 1001b., succeeded in destroying the rails at Menin. . The risks Lieutenant Carmi chael ran may be gathered from the fact that on the return journey his engine was damaged by a bullet, which necessitated his flying at a height of less than 200 feet. Equally daring was the feat of Lieutenant E. F. Pretyman, of the Somerset Light Infantry and Royal Flying Corps, who the day after Lieu tenant Carmichael's feat also won the D.S.O. The clouds being low, he had to fly very low for a considerable per iod all along the German positions to ascertain their movements, being ex posed the whole time to a very heavy fire. Escaping this peril, the follow ing day he blew up the c...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"Mabel's" Heroism. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 7 August 1915

"Mabel's" Heroism. They called him "Mabel" in the 3rd Battalion, London Regiment/ f?oyal Fusiliers (Territorials). His "real name was Lieutenant C. A. W. Crichton, and the story of how he fell at Neuve Chapelle provides a stirring page' in the history of this great war. To the 3rd came the com mand late in the afternoon to take a German trench on the right. With a yell they were over the breastworks ■ and on to the. open ground, swept by a pitiless fire. The 3rd reached the trench, and the Germans surrender ed; but the price of conquest ~vas dear. Lieutenant Crichton was among the dying. When the order to advance was given the lieutenant stepped in front of his platoon and with the cry, "Follow me!" was first on the exposed ground. Before be had gone many yards a bullet struck his leg and he stumbled. One or two of the men following oil went to help him, but he was too quick for them. Struggling to bis feet he shouted the "Charge" again, and stumbled on. An other bullet caught him, ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 7 August 1915

For children's hacking cough at night, WoodB' Great Peppermint Care, Is 6d

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FROM THE FIRING LINE. "Bravest Man I Ever Saw." [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 7 August 1915

FROM THE FIRING LINE. "Bravest Man I Ever Saw." That is the tribute -which an offi cer of the Welsh Fusiliers. pays to Walter George Fletcher, an Eton master, who was killed in the trench es recently. The Germans had cap tured a French flag, and in derision, apparently, hung it in their lines on a tree. Fletcher determined to recap ture it. He crawled all night between the flare-lights, secured the flag and brought it back to our lines. "Now it waves in our trenches," writes the officer. "Fletcher ought to have been given the Victoria Cross and a court martial; but it was worth doing. No thing delighted and inspirited the 'Tommies' more." Alas! Fletcher, who was attached to the Welsh Fusi liers, was wounded in the bead while in the trenches, and never recovered consciousness.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Veteran Councillor. CR. J. SHEPHERD RESIGNS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 7 August 1915

*' i - & SHEPHERD RESIGNS. At Thursday's meeting of the Gren ville Shire Conncil, when a vote of thanks was moved to the retiring coun cillors, Cr Joseph Shepherd stated that owing to th8 natural infirmities of bis time of life he was not as capable as he had been of carrying out the duties of his position, and he would therefore not seek re-election* The news came as a shock to the meeting, and efforts were made to indnce Cr Shepherd to re-con sider his decision, but without a/ail. Cr-Wallis said, they should >ake more than passing notice of Cr. Shepherd's retirement; He, as well as other niem l?rsrfa/?d fl biffh regard for Cr Shepherd always keen in the in terests of the 'West riding, and who fought for what he believed to be right and just. He was a veteran councillor who was looked up to with pride and pleasure, and he (the speaker) had been pleased at all times to be associated with such'an old and experienced colleague* He wished Cr Shepherd in his retirement happin...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Quietened. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 7 August 1915

Quietened. At a music-hall a young "knut" and his lady-love caused some annoyance to those sitting near "by continually talking and giggling. Hints to quiet them were of no avail, until a work ing-man, who, with his "missus," oc cupied a seat jufet behind the amor ous couple, determined to end it. Speaking quite loudly, -the man said: "I call it a shame, making such a row as people can't hear." At this the young man turned around, and in an affected manner said: "I hope I a.m not annoying you, sir." . "Oh, no," answered the man. "You are not annoying me. You go on with your little tales; I likes 'em. But I was just sayin' to my missis, that it's a jolly shame for that young wo man on the stage to make such a noise, so that I can't properly 'ear all that you're saying!" The young man was quiet after thie.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x