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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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A VALUABLE INVENTION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

A VALUABLE INVENTION. % —«— An American genius, by name William Eddy, ot Bayonne, N.J., after considerable scientific research of the kite in all its forms, has (say* a United States contemporary) discovered its use ton a study of air currents, celestial magnetism, and other similar subject*. In aerial photography, by mean* of cameras suspended from kites, it is said he has produced valuable results in various fields. Lately he has directed his attention to the flag as an anemometer, and it would appear that he has reached a practical conclusion which should be of great service to yachtsmen. Aocordlng to his observations, when a flag on some high point hangs nearly vertical, rising and falling two or three times in a minute, the wind Is hut three to six knots; when it flies out horizontally, but frequently drops below the horisonta! position, the wind is blowing from eight to ten knots; when it flies evenly and steadily in an horizontal posi tion, the wind is blowing from 15 to 20 k...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Week in a Coffin WITHOUT FOOD OR DRINK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

A Week in a Coffin WITHOUT FOOD OR DRINK. r>fffYfrr#f"f"r-Ff PAPUSS, IN HIS "CRYSTAL URN." M. Georges Papuas ended bis great fast at the ( Royal Aquarium, London, at half-past ten on , the night of December 7. Aa far as the duration < of it is concerned, there is nothing remarkable ( ) about bis performance, for it has only lasted a ) week; but the condl tiona of It are so severe as to ? attract more than ordinary attention. ( For a week past he bae succeeded in hoodwink ( ing himself that there are no such things as hua \ ger and thirst, for you muet know that he is \ that strange product of a freakish age—an auto ) suggestor. And it must be said that he is mak ) ing rather a grim aort of jest at his own ex pense. He muet have developed a good many horse power of auto-suggestion, for he began his faat by putting himself into a cataleptic trance for 48 hours. He was no sooner "off" than he was plac ed in a sealed crystal coffin, into which air is pumped by an electric ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHILI AND ARGENTINA. THEIR FIGHTING FORCES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

CHILI AND ARGENTINA. THEIR FIGHTING FORCES. In a recent issue of "The World's News" some interesting particulars were given of the strain ed relations between Chili and Argentina. As these two Republics are not yet absolutely out of the wood so far as war is concerned, a glance at their respective fighting forces gives food for reflection. Both Chili and Argentina are bristling with arms, and each could place an army of 100,000 perfectly-traiined men in the field. The racial differences are very distinctly marked. In Argentina the dominant blood is Italian, with an admixture of Indian blood; in Chili Spanish, with a large mingling of Eng lish. In the south of Chili, however, the Spaniards have married Indians. If war came Chili would have to bring her army round from Valparaiso on the Pacific coast to Bahia Blanca, a port on the South Atlantic. The Chilians, however, are all moun taineers, and would send troops into Mendoza. For some years army administration in Chili has been contr...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MOVING PLATFORM IN PARIS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

MOVING PLATFORM IN PARIS. M. Casalonga, as engineer, has tubmitted to the civil engineers of Paris a echemo for an under ground moving platform similar to that which was used at the Paris Exhibition. The platform will, according to the scheme, be established between the Place de la Concorde and the Bastille, the route corresponding to the main boulevard*. The motion will attain a speed of 12 miles in the middle, and there will be access every 200 yards. The scheme is approved by the engineers, and may one day be adopted.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHERE "GUARDIAN ANGELS" WATCH OVER DRUNKARDS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

> WHERE "GUARDIAN ANGELS" ) ; WATCH OVER DRUNKARDS. 1 ■ ) > ) Considering that Great Britain'is described as < ) the most drunken nation in the world, it Is < ) strange that what are known as "guardian an- < > gels" have not made their appearance in the old S > country. On the Continent "guardian angels" 1 * earn quite a remunerative livelihood. When the ; j evening is fairly advanced, a "guardian •angel" ) ' will take up his position outside a wine shop ) 1 tillhis services are required to assist any mem- ) 1 ber of the company tome, whose potations may ) i have rendered him incapable of performing that S ) office himself. ) i It will be seeti from this that "guardian S i angels." however great their poverty, must be \ i men of proved honesty and courage, a good dose ( , of the latter quality being necessary to protect ( , the helpless one from the assaults of those who c war on society. * c In Prance there are "guardian angels" and ? "g...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
B.-P. INVENTS A DEVICE FOR PREVENTING STAMPEDES IN ACTION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

! B.-P. INVENTS I ) ( > i nr i > A DEVICE FOR PREVENTING < I STAMPEDES IN ACTION. ' i B.-P.'s brain Is never- still. His versatile j ( nature is for ever improvising and improving. J ( The stern needs of war have shown him many 5 S plans to help cavalrymen in action, and one ) ) of the most important is a method to hold I ) horses in action against stampede. ( ) He has Just been asked to submit his plan ( \ to the War Office. The idea is simplicity itself, J ( and, seeing that it allows every man to go into ) ( action, has been favorably received by the War J ( Office officials. ) ( The system is that of leaving the reins V ) simply undone on the off side of the horse's ( ) bit, the nearest side being left fastened. The ( i rein is then fastened to the near aide stirrup, t 1 so as to give just sufficient pulling power on > the horse*8 mouth to keep it moving in a small > circle, if it is inclined to move at all. In this i way, it will be seen that all possibil...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE TAHITI FIREWALK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

THE TAHITI FIRE WALK. —+—. The "firewalk" ceremony of Tahiti has at last received something of an investigation such as may satisfy folks who have never been slow to challenge the inability of science to explain what they have hitherto regarded as a modern miracle. The ceremony consists in the natives, led by a priest, walking without injury over stones said to be in a red-hot condition, produced by their being Seated in a fire which has been kept burn ing for many hours. Professor S. P. Langley, of the Smithsonian In stitution, in Washington, visited Tahiti, saw the ceremony, and contributed a lucid account of the whole proceedings to "Nature." The investiga tions disclosed the fact that the stones walked on appear to be so hot that no human foot could safely tread their fiery way. We do not, in reality, possess a temperature which, the native feet cannot withstand. Certain Europeans walked over the stones in Professor Langley's presence in their shoes. The soles were not burnt at ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE TWO SEASONS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

THE TWO SEASONS. She: "You men claim to be the salt of the earth!" ' He (mildly): "But. my dear, we-have never de- ; Bied your claim to beins the fewer."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MOST VALUABLE THING THIS WORLD AFFORDS. THE KING'S BIBLE AT THE CORONATION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

! MOST VALUABLE THING i THIS WOULD AFFORDS. * THE KINO'S BIBLE AT THE CORONATION. The King having already intimated that ha will accept, for his personal use at the Corona tion a Bible to be specially prepared and pre sented by the British and Foreign Bible Society, steps are now being taken by the . society to design a suitably elaborate copy of the Scrip tures for the Royal hands. We understand that the directors have been able to. Inspect the actual Bible used by the late Queen at the Abbey on her Coronation Day is 1338. This treasured Book is in the possession of Mrs. Sumner, who resides in the Channel Isles, and who it> a relative of Bishop Sumner, Of Worces ter, the prelate who carried the Queen's Bible at the ceremony, and subsequently handed it to her Majesty. The Queen afterwards presented the Boole to the Bishop,; and bis lordship's descendants naturally treasure it-proudly. The Kuig's Bible,, which will, of . course, em brace tfcfe' Authorised Version, wiU-Jte. partial...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SITTING BURIALS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

SITTING BURIALS. Tho pleasantly-situated village of PJomborn, in the district of Alzei, Grand Ducby-of Hesse, with its still existing mediaeval fortifications, was recently the objective point .of * a" number of leading archaeologists, amobg thenfc-Professor Virchow, of the University of Berlin. In extending the cemetery of the burg, a number of remarkable graves were found, which were soon identified by experts as "sitting burials." Thirteen of the graves were opened to the visitors for inspection. The •well-preserved skeletons have, according to a recent report on the subject, an age estimated at abbut 5000 to 6000 years, and hence belong to the pure stone age. All the skeletons were in a sitting posir tion, arms and legs tightly pressed against the body. The skeletons show an exceedingly robust build. The other archaeological., output of the graves (says the "Family Doctor") was very meagre, only one stone hatchet of grey schistose elate was found. Between these sitting burials w...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEW YORK FLOODED. BIG WATER MAIN BURSTS AND CAUSES HAVOC. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

NEW YORK FLOODED. BIG WATER MAIN BURSTS AND CAUSES HAVOC. That portion of fashionable New York which is situated In the immediate neighborhood of Ma dison-avenue and 53rd and 59th streets has had a disagreeable, not to say a dangerous visitation in the shaps of a flood. The other evening a water main buret, and threw up a column of water 2ft. through and 10ft. high. For three hours the broad fountain played, its millions of gallons sweeping the streets with "pomp of waters unwithetood." The flood, rush ing ' in a stream 3ft. deep, overflowed into base ments, invaded ground floors, and leapt into win dows and doorways, cauBing panic and carrying desolation. Housemaids swooned, valets sought safety in flight to the upper storeys, but the waters rose inexorably, extinguishing the fires in the base ments, and in half an hour there was not a fur nace burning for twenty blocks around. All egreea from the flooded buildings was bar red by the stream, whcee swift current carried off their fe...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE PLAGUE. HOW RUSSIA FIGHTS IT. FIVE MILLION RATS TO BE KILLED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

THE PLAGUE. HOW BITSSI A FIGHTS IT. FIVE MILLION BATS TO BE KILLED. Convinced of the dai:ger of rats spreading the contagion of bubonic plague during the recent outbreak In Odessa (an important Russian port), the Governor, Count P. P. Schouvaloff, initiated a vigorous campaign against the rodents, paying a nremium of %d for each rat, dead or alive, captured. Already n eum of £2000 has been paid, repre senting the destruction of 1,000,000 rats. The campaign is still energetically prosecuted. As the rats are taken, they are conveyed to specially erected district furnaces, where the carcases are cremated. It was curious and amusing to watch the attempts made by the rats in the quarantine har bor to find a temporary shelter aboard, the ships. All the vessels in port were moored a little way from the quays, and the harbor police set to watch the chains and mooring ropes, along which the rats tried to reach the steamers in con tinuous processions, but were prevented l»y the guards and rat...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A THIEF'S NEW IDEA. SHOPKEEPER INGENIOUSLY MADE TO ROB HIMSELF. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

A THIERS NEW IDEA. SHOPKEEPER INGENIOUSLY HADE TO BOB HIMSELF. 1 A beautiful carriage stopped at one of the best 1 Jewellery shops in St. Petersburg recently, a lac 1 key jumped off the box, opened the floor of the ( carriage, and let pass a brave general, whose right ! hand wae In a sling. The general entered the shop, investigated the t coetly articles with the eye of an expert, and , while talking to the proprietor, purchased a fe# things, for which he paid in cash. Hie proprietor was quite delighted, and while the purchased ar ticles were being wrapped up in a parcel, caned the attention of the general to a magnifioent en amelled silver tea-set, The general looked at it approvingly, and asked in a careless way for the price. Three hundred pounds, your excellency." "This is not dear at all—it's awfully nioe. What a pity that I have not got any more money with me. . . ." "I could send it to your house with one of my clerks, your excellency." "H'm. yes. . . . No. you had better giv...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

FACES MAIM? LOVELY by CREMODERMA, the GREAT FRECKLE CUBE. Removes all Disfigurement*, Cures Ecaetna and all Skin Diseases. 1/ and 2/6. By post from Chief Depot, A. KINO. Chemist, Gurner-st., Paddinfton; 1/3 stamps, and 3/. Wholesale, ELLIOTT BROS.—Advt.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FIRE! [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

FIRE ! ( A novel project at Rouen is th6 placing of elec f trie fire-CKtinguishing pumpi in different parts ( of the town, with switches to take current from ( the wires of the street railway when a Are } occurs.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BANK ROBBERIES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

BANK ROBBERIES. The frauds on the Bank of Liverpool call to mind cases wherein the deficit to be made up was larger than that which the directors of that institution had to face. Probably the only exception in recent times was that of the Union Bank of London, which, in April, 1860, lost £263,000. In connection with this deficiency a man named Pullinger confessed himself guilty of forgery and fraud, and was sentenced to 20 years' imprisonment. Early in the last century the forgeries of a man named Fauntieroy, who was subsequently hanged, cost the Bank of England £360,000, In 1883 the London and River Plate Bank was robbed of securities amounting to nearly £116,000. The thief and an accomplice each got 12 years' penal servitude. The Commercial Bank of London suffered, In February, 1861, to the extent of £67,000, al though a large part of it was recovered. The theft, as in numerous cases, was the work of one of the clerks. Rogers' Bank was robbed in 1844 of nearly £50,000, but the ban...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Coronation. SOME OF THE PLANS. BABY PEERS TO BE PRESENT WITH THEIR NURSES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

The Coronation. SOME OF THE PLANS. • —*— BABY PEERS TO BE PRESENT WITH THEIR NURSES. i Westminster Abbey will be surrendered to the Earl Marshal on Easter Monday, and he, with the Board of Works, will carry out the elaborate scheme of building galleries and other extensive alteration* in the interior of the building for the Coronation service next June. . At the first Jubilee two galleries were erected In the nave, but the authorities have decided that the uppermost one shall not be built on this occasion. The gallery usually erected in the eastern por tion of the Abbey at big functions will be dia in n inn Tiiifinir nrtwifvir CORONATION ROBES ON WAX MODELS AT NORFOLK HOUSE. pensed with, on account of its occupying the place where the most sacred rite of the Corona tion takes place. The timber to be used in the construction of seats -will cost £10,000, and the galleries will be supported on huge baulks of well-seasoned English oak. The additional accommodation provided by the erecti...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A REMARKABLE STORY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

A REMARKABLE STORY. Regarding the escapes of criminals,, the "Out look" says that when the newspapers declare that all ports, towns, and roads are being closely watched, the man Who knows can only smile. There died the other year in a little place in Wales a man who fled from justice on account of forgery and embezzlement in a northern town. He simply took, various trains, slow and local by preference, direct to Wales, engaged lodgings, and there remained for 20 years untraced and un suspected. He even married, though his .wife was alive; and only some papers found, 'quite acci dentally as it were, in a tin box at his death, re* veal«d bis identity. ,

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
COSTS OF CORONATIONS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

COSTS OF CORONATIONS. While great preparations are being made for S King Edward's coronation, it may be of interest ) to point out that the most expensive coronation ; on record -was that of the present Czar of Russia. ^ Upwards of £3,000,000 was spent by the Govern- ( ment alone, and fully another £1,000,000 by the ( public authorities of varisus Russian towns. The representatives of the other Powers vied with each other in lavish outlays, and, counting the sums spent by other persons, the coronation of Nicholas II. cannot have cost much lees than £5,000,000. The then Duke of Devonshire was the British representative, and spent fully £30,000 of his own money in connection with it. The corn nation of George IV. was the most expensive of any English monarch, and this only cost £2,500,000. Of this amount £25,000 was expended on the coro nation robe, and £45,000 on the crown. The cost of the coronation of George III. did not amount to half that of the coronation of George IV. The ( who...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Prince of Wales' Crest. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

The Prince of Wales' Crest. % The royal proclamation announcing the recognition of Wales in the "achievement" of the Prince of Wales by the addition of the red dragon, passant gules, on a mount vert, was recently published by cable. As will be seen from the above illustration—which, we may mention, has received official approval, anh which shows the exact position of the crests, above and on either side of the helmet—the Prince's "achievement" is now a beautiful specimen of heraldic art. In the centre comes the royal crest, the collar or "label" round the lion's neck, "for difference," indicating the Prince's relationship to his father. The ostrich feathers, with the motto "Ich Dien," remain in the design as before. On the other side is the red dragon, on a green mount, also marked with the "label." Students of heraldry are now awaiting an announcement as to the title which will be shortly conferred on Prince Edward of York, and as to the arms that he will bear. The Prince of Wales,...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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