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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

7o The Indian Advocate. AN INDIAN ARISTOCRACY. The " Crazy Snake Rebellion" has had an inglorious termination. It is not a fitting finale to the warlike achieve ments of a tribe with a history filled with valorous deeds, sometimes resulting in conquest and never before in such dis honorable defeat. "Crazy Snake" now finds himself more condemned by the Indians than by the whites, not because the Indians have no sympathy with his national aspirations, but because they feel keenly that he has lowered the prestige of Creek arms in what practically all of them realized from the beginning, was a hopeless undertaking. The Indians want it understood that the so-called "rebellion" was in no sense one of the tribe or "nation" of Creeks, and they would like to impress it upon the Caucasian mind that, if the "nation" had made common cause with the Snake band, their defeat, while inevitable, would have made another glorious page in Creek history. That history, it may be admitted, is one of prowe...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

yj The Indian Advocatk. 71 IV K!i'! - The name "Creek" has never been their liking, but they'have accepted it as a necessary part of their vicissitudes and as a result of the disastrous fortunes of war. According to their traditions, they left Mexico about the year 1520. In all probability the exodus was several years after that date, as the Spanish subjugation of Mexico was not completed before 1525. There are old stories of the unavailing valor of the Muskogees against the invader who came in ships. They tell of the enslavement and degradation of the Aztecs, but the Muskogees were neither to be enslaved nor degraded. They antedated the Boers in tricking, by more than two cen turies. According to their legends, some priests of the Toltec faith came with them, but these had disappeared, as well as all the forms and ceremonies of that faith, when next they came in contact with the white race, in the eighteenth century. Creek, or Muskogee, traditions are rich in stories of a thousand ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

"''''yPIHBBpEf 72 The Indian Advocatic. vague apprehension of a 'Great Spirit" and a "happy hunt ing grounds." It was in this condition the white man found him when he came again. The white man gave the tribe the name of "Creeks" because of their propensity for well-watered coun tries. He found them and their neighbors, the Seminoles, more troublesome than any of the other tribes of the South east. This may have been, and doubtless was, the result of hereditary bitterness and distrust, surviving for three centuries, and moving them to accept death as the welcome alternative of what they feared was to be slavery in the event of their subjugation. Gen. Jackson, who led one campaign against tbfem, is on record with saying they "faught like devils." De sultory warfare, directed against the United States Govern ment, or against the settlers in Alabama, Georgia and Florida, continued until 1832, when the treaty under which the Creeks now held .their land in this territory was made. CREEK ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

r rmm t ""- - ' t -"T -v "-rT- " - ;. ..' W"T "rty "ISTy 1"1 f 1 Tin: Indian Auvocati:. 73 And perhaps there can be found nowhere in the world a prouder or more exclusive aristocracy than this. Even when the most impoverished and ignorant, as it sometimes is. it asserts itselt imperiously. Thluso, of Weatherford is another historic name in Creek genealogy. His descendants are numerous among the full bloods,. and some of them are to be found among those not wholly ot the Indian strain. For the most part, however, the descendants ot thereat have kept themselves free from con tamination. This is particularly true of those ot the old Chief Menawa, who lived a century ago, but whose memory is cherished and whose posterity delight in honoring it. They are compelled to acknowledge, however, that some of the names which add luster to the Creek history are not of Indian sound or oiigin. McGillivray is suggestive of the canny Scot, who cast his fortunes with the tribe, and whose diplomatic ta...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

74 Thk Indian Advocatic. Creek van in all their battles with hostile tribes, he gave new luster to the Creek name. If all this could be forgotten, in these "weak, piping times of peace," the story of his house would still survive in the lingering recollection ot the beauty of his famous twin daughters, Ari and Adne. Ari and Adne, tradition has it, were peerless even among the women of the quarter bloods, and one who has seen the perfect loveliness of many of the yonng fourth-caste women of this Indian coun try will understand the superlative degree of comparison. Mrs. "Paddy" Carr was the flower of the tribe when the valor and wit of the half-breed "Paddy" broke down the exclusive ness of the full-blood caste of that day, and the first fruit of the union was Ari and Adne, with as high a place among the the Creek immortals af belongs to warriors or statesmen. It may be added that such an immortality means something, in a land where handsome young women are by no means rare. THE CREEK...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

Tun Indian Advocatk. 75 every effort to put and end to tribal relations. They have op posed the Curtis law, to the treaties being negotiated under it, allotment and every step toward a change in conditions. Their resentment of the changes now going on, and the greater changes which are imminent, led to the absurd uprising of "Crazy Snake" and his band, which even the most skillful newspaper sensationalists have been unable to magnify out of ridiculous proportions. CREEK GOVERNMENT. Frequent reteretice in the dispatches to "light horsmen" can not be understood without explanation. "Light horsemen" in the Creek Nation were so named in the original constitution and laws of the Creek tribal government as the officers or dep uties of the Creek courts, organized to have jurisdiction ovet all offenses against the tribal laws. Each court has five light horsemen, and these have served well as couriers in the sup pression of the insurrection. Besides creating these courts, the Creek constitut...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

76 The Indian Advocate. THE REVEREND DOMINIC Du RANQUET, S. J. The oldest priest in Canada, and patriarch of our Indian missionaries. Father Dominic du Ranquet, S, J., died at Wik wemikong, Manitoulin Island, on December 12th, after a mar velous apostleship of fifty-eight years amongst the Ojibways along Lakes Huron and Superior, Father du Ranquet, whose family belonged to the old French nobility, was born at Puy-de-Dome, in France, January 20th, 181 3, and had therefore completed nearly eighty-eight years at the time of his death. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1838, and was followed in to the Order by four of his brothers, three of whom died in the perilous missions of Madura in India, and one in the United States. Dominic came to Canada in 1842, and after a few months at Oka. on the Lake ot Two Mountains, studying the Indian tongues, lie visited the missions of the Upper Ottawa, and then began his long career among the Ojibways along the Lakes. His first fixed mission was on ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

Tiik Indian Advocate. 1J trips, Father du Ranquet lost his bearings in a fog on Lake Superior. He was out of sight of land, and wandered aim lessly about for three days, in his canoe, with nothing to eat. He gave himself up for lost, and was preparing tor the worst, when a wild bird came and perched on his canoe. The starv ing missionary killed it with his paddle, and ate it raw, thus sustaining his life and strength until he was rescued. Father du Ranquet had a remarkable ascendency over the Ojibways. He spoke their language perfectly, and had from the beginning ol his career among them identified himself with the tribe under the name which they had officially given him, of "Waiasseshkang" (one who enlightens.) Except during the closing years of his life, when the infirmities of his old age did not allow him to take long journeys, he was always on the move in bark canoes or on snow-shoes, with scanty luggage and a portable altar on his back, visiting the various bands of the tribe....

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

Ts' ""S'""!. " "f ' TV-"'Tr- 7 The Indian Advocate. !ifiW"T?r' 'ff 71- 't-; T"y THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. PCrBLISHED BY THE BENEDICTINE FATHUKS Ol' SACRED HEART MISSION, OKLAHOMA. A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved by Rt. Rev. Theo. Meerschaert, Vicar-Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian Territories. TERMS OF SUBSOKIITIONl Single Copies T5C- Annual $1.00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . . .75c Foreign Si. 25. Entered as Second-class Matter at Sa( red Heart. Oklahoma. PRIVILEGESi 1. Eery Subscriber and Benefactor will participate in all the merits, prayer and good works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. . 2. A solemn High Mass is sung every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month foi our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. Every year, in ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

Tub Indian Advocatk. 79 Second. St. Benedict's Industrial School for Indian boys, a two-story building 18x54 feet. Third. The Abbatial and Parochial Church, 60x114 eet erected nine years ago; the best finished edifice of worship in Oklahoma; the pride of every Catholic that ever walked into it; the object of many cares and untiring zeal, the crowning work of Rt. Rev. Father Thomas, of blessed memory. Fourth. St. Mary's the Motherhouse and Novitiate of the Sisters of Mercy in Oklahoma was connected with it, St. Mary'.- Academy length of building 96 feet in front, North and South, and 120 feet East and. West. The services of the good Sisters have been highly appreciated by all those that have been in contact with them. Fifth. A Store House, 20x60 feet full of provisions. Sixth. A Cottage 14x20, where a family lived. These items show the loss in buildings. The loss in con tents is simply immense; the progress of the fire was so rapid that very little could be saved. Several of the Falh...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

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Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

The Indian Advocate. 81 We may truly exclaim with the prophet of old: ''By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea we wept when we remembered you." Dear old Sacred Heart ! where art thou? "what has be come of thee? If these crumbling walls could speak, they would tell us what they have witnessed of holy prayers, self denial and hard labor, during the lapse of twenty-five years. If the courageous and noble hearted pioneer, Rt. Rev. I. Robot, whose remains rest in peace near the sad ruins, would stand up and speak, he would cell us many a thrilling story of the early days of what fatigues and hardships "Sacred Heart Mission" cost him. May the prayers and merits of the noble Missionary obtain that his successors be enabled to recon struct, and continue successfully the laudable work of chris tian education in Oklahoma. , La us tua in fines fcrrac. The above shows a partial view of the ruins of the main buildings, from a photograph taken the next day.

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

82 The Indian Advocatk. COMMUNICATED. We all well know how beneficial fire is, but full well do we also know its terrible consequence if this, so noble a gift of God is allowed to transgress its boundaries and take posses sion, as it were, of a place or thing where its presence is dreaded. Not till the night of the 15th of January, 1901, did the inmates of Sacred Heart Abbey and College, experience in such a shocking manner, the qualities of this munificent gift, which had so suddenly transformed itself into a devastat ing monster, that in the short space of two hours, the Monas tery, Church, Convent, College, Industrial School and Alum nate, were reduced to a heap of ashes. Fire was firrt discovered in the refectory of the boys, and despite every effort to check its course, had soon devoured the mpnastery, extending its darts of destruction to the college, industrial school and alumnate. Owing to the discipline and onier maintained in the institution, at the cry of fire from the pr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

ffcT The Indian Advocate. 83 hearty breakfast. Now came the sad moment of parting. After bidding farewell to professors and friends, and casting a parting look of sorrow upon their once so cherished abode, our comrades left for the station, accompanied by their Rev. Director. We bid God speed to you, dear college chums, and we hope in the near future to meet again in the New Sacred Heart College, where the joy of reunion will surpass the sorrow we experienced in parting. We also hope that the old students will not forget Alma-Mater, but lend a helping hand towards the rebuilding ot so faithful a mother. One or Them. The above cut shows the Ruins of St. Mary's Academy. r(

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

f 84 The Indian Advocate. LOCALS. Hon. Robert Wood has introduced a bill prohibiting the sale or giving away of liquor within two miles of Sacred Heart Mission. Died; Feb. 9, 1901, David, the son of Baptist and Mary Bruno. Dave was one of our old Indian pupils. R. I. P. A generous friend of ours sent us a bell to replace the three that were melted by the fire of January last God reward and bless our Doner. It is rumored again that a new railroad is shortly to pass not far from the Mission when it does come we will let our readers know more about it. March is the month dedicated to St. Joseph let us go to Joseph and ask him all we need, he will obtain it for us, if we ask it rightly. Rev. Father Elias Fink has been nominated Temporal Manager of the Abbey, ; cine re; Rev. Father Fr. Placidus takes his place in Chickasha, Ind. Ter. Fasting, abstinence and self-denial constitute a hard, but wholsome diet when properly and judiciously taken. Many iuquiries have come to us since the fire,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

"HFI"'ffnFkpr,'''w ,,lWy, 't'T 'm The Indian Advocate. 35 -- -j-' ---- Mr. Heintz, the telephone man came down from Purcell to connect us again with the outer world. As to the question where will you Fathers and Sisters locate next? Weanswer nothing has been decided as yet, but will be soon, meanwhile we try to recall some of our alumni. Our day school has forty pupils. ' The conferees have agreed on the Creek treaty; the Cherokees are still in dispute. Exterior View of Sacred Heart Church, Destroyed by the fire.

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

1 (-. ' " w!T-y!iuWTnW!lWlf'TV. '' 8d The Indian Advocate. ryr-" ST. PATRICK'S DAY. After our Divine Lord had ascended in majesty from Mt. Olivet, leading captivity captive to the delightful home of His Father, His Apostles, faithful to the commission which they had received from Him, went forth to bear His name to the limits of the habitable earth. It was a wonderful sight to see. Twelve poor fishermen, destitute of the world's riches, un skilled in the world's learning, go forth to conquer the world; and the power of God went with them, supplying the want of learning and of wealth, and the sound of their voices echoed in all the earth. North and south, east and west, their foot steps passed with a music like the tramps of armies and a success that could, only come from the God of Battles. Men began tp feel that there was abroad a strange influence which they could not grasp, but which mastered the keenest intellect and subdued the most stubborn will. The wondr ous story of the Cru...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

w rFsrrwvy"i The Indian Advocate. 87 and faithful beyond all other men, at another, cruel and vin dictive with a savagery passing all belief: a people who possess ed a language of rare force and richness, and who had created a poetry of marvelous sweetness and imaginative beauty. But most of all, they had made themselves known to the ancient world hy their fierce and ruthless raids on the coasts and sea ports of Eastern Europe. In their proud galleys, sweeping with their long oars the billows of the Irish Sea and chanting wild war-songs to the rythmic surge of the waes, they came down upon the rude, rural homes of Brittany, carrying devas tation before them and carrying away to their sea-girded home rich booty of gold and silver and human slaves. It was about the year 386 or 390 when a King from this island went forth with his warships and warriors- out upon the face of the sea and scoured the northern coasts of France, destroying many towns and villages and carrying away the choice...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

fr T-yrr '" . .yj'W Ugf """W'-t1 f IT 1 ''"T ' P"T -f.-" y- 88 , The Indian Advocate. God, and he communed with him in spirit, and then first learned the mysterious secret by which the weak things of this world confront and confound the strong the secret of prayer by which the weak lisp of the creature's heart may move the arm of Almighty power. He prayed, and the light of God, and the love that feeds the light, streamed in with inexpressive sweetness on his parched heart. He prayed night and day: to the enforced fasting of his cruel captivity, he added the voluntary fasting of love; to the brutal scourging that he was forced to endure from his ruthless Pagan master, he added the voluntary discipline of penance and mortification, expiating with bitter tears and anguish of spirit, the sins of his youth. Thus in the fiery crucible of suffering was his soul prepared for the duties of His Apostolate; and when, acting under the inspiration of God, he eventually escaped from his exile and...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

Thk Indian Advocate. 89 Vf w4 came again to Ireland. He came again he, once Patrick the slave, now came to conquer; and his was a conquest, the like of wjiich the world has never, nor shall ever know again. His mission to the Irish race was not the mission of a mere teach er or of an oracle of a new civilization. Patrick cared not. How sumptuously his people fared, and how bravely they maintained their honor. Ireland might never become famous for her acquisitions and accumulations of material wealth. What of it? Tyre and Sidon of old were the store-houses of the world, and to-day, where are they? Only the jackal's howl wakes the ghastly silentness of their ruins. Ireland might never become famous for the daring chivalry of her navigators. What of it? Carthage, of old, peopled the sea with her vent urous ships, and to-day, where is she? Only a memory. Ire land might never become famous for the intellectual attain ments of her people. What of it? Athens of old, in her hey day of her g...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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