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Title: Ranche And Range Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 25 June 1898

r. Vehicles, Harness, Farm Implements, Etc. WR.TEUS FRANK Mm SHAW, UNION WAREHOUSE AND MACHINE CO. Cor- Post &N- p- Track, spokane, wash. I'LKASJ.; MKXTION RANCH AND KAXCIE. ing the warm season, the cows through the win!or foraging in the woods and brush with out shelter, except what the big trees afford ed. Though oats produce from 40 to 75 bushels to the acre, and, when chopped make one of the very best foods for dairy cows, they are not raised here except to feed horses in the sheaf. But there are no flouring mills (except one small one on the coast near Nes tucca bay) in Clatsop or Tillamook. Some millstuffs are fed to cows in the former coun ty. Selling: tlie Products. The dairy products of this region find ready sale in San Francisco, Astoria and Portland. Tillamook butter has long had the reputation for its keeping qualities, and there is a special demand for it on this ac count. The butter and cheese of the Coos bay factories are marketed at San Francisco, where they hav...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 25 June 1898

raised on low, moist land, and after hay is taken off the stubble grows again, producing excellent grazing. Hut vetches produce nearly twice as much feed as oats and are of equal value to clover for feeding cows. A few have begun to raise sugar beets for their cows to feed in the fall, and they are un doubtedly the best root raised for milk and butter, the percentage of sugar being quite high, averaging 15 per cent, from actual tests at the agricultural station. It has been proved by experiment also that corn can be profitably raised in the Willamette valley for silage. Corn niul Alfalfa for Kccml. George Weeks, of Marion County, uses corn silage and considers it a profitable food for the dairy. Though, wherever clover suc ceeds well it is a more profitable crop than corn, for being more complete food for milch cows, it can be produced at less cost and does not exhaust the soil. The valleys of the TTmpqua and Rogue rivers also produce good crops of corn, both for silage and for grai...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 25 June 1898

s Ranch and Range ISSI'KII K.VK.KY HATUHIIAY. In tin- Interests of the Farmers, Horticulturists, and Stockmen of Washington 1 Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah, British Columbia. PUBLISHED my mm RANCH AM' RANGE COMPANY. Conductkd BY - MILLER FREEMAN Assistant Editor - 11. M. WALLACE/B. A, Editorial Office*, .... Seattle, Wash. liITSINKHS <)!• kicks: Seattle, ... 815-310 Pioneer building. Spokane, - - Suite F Hypotheek bank building. nnnsomiPTioK, in ADVANCE, - $1.00 i-kk ykah. Address all communications to Ranch and Range, 315-31G Pioneer building, Seattle, Washington. Paint saves money. Remember this win n making improvements on your farm. Many farmers being in a more prosperous condition than they have been for years ate investing some of this prosperity in new buildings. Now be sure and paint these new buildings and thus protect them after yon have them built. And wouldn't it be well to paint the machinery and many of the old buildings, 100. As we stated righi at the first, paint s...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 25 June 1898

tion the showers, although lighter and less frequent, were still copious. In the Western section where haying had LiegUO the Wet weather interfered with cut ting and curing, and the heavy rains and brisk winds lodged grass rather badly; a lit tle hay that was down is reported damaged The weather was favorable for potatoes and root crops, which grew fast. Oats are re ported to be in tine condition. Cherries are beginning to ripen, but the crop is not a heavy one. Nothing unfavorable to the hop crop has yet developed. In the wheat sections the situation is sat isfactory. Showers and cool weather have mused good growth. Fall sown wheat is be ginning to fill, and a continuation of cool weather would be most beneficial. The in jury done to wheat by the hot spell from the 4th to 11th inst., was apparently slight. The reports in regard to fruit in the Eastern sec tion are now more favorable, especially as regards apricots and peaches in Columbia county. Southwest Counties: Fulton—Fall whea...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 25 June 1898

10 CASTRATION BY TURNING. lii buying feeding lambs one is Tory apt to get among them a few rain lambs OP in liis own flock he may have been so careless as to allow some late-dropped lambs to go oncastrated until fall, op he may have a ram that he does not wish to use again. These cases call for emasculation in some way. Castration, be it ever so carefully per formed, is dangerous in the sheep after his babyhood is passed. The operation of turn in«r i s n ot difficult —is safe, sure and makes nearly as nice a wether as does castration. While it is easier to learn this process by personal instruction, yet I believe that any one can do it who will follow closely these directions: The assistant holds the sheep in a Bit ting position. The opera ton grasps the scro tum or bag, and by squeezing it firmly forces the testicles clear out of it and up into the sheep's groin, one on each side. Re sure that the testicles are entirely free of the scrotal membranes; it requires a little force to p...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 25 June 1898

*Tphe poultry Y ar^* S. M. SHIPLEY, :::::: Editor. BARRED ROCK EGG RECORD. A breeder of Barred Plymouth Rocks sub mils the following record of 20 hens for one year ending December :*O, 1897: "Eggs laid —January, 92; February, 105; March, 460; April. 461; May, 302; June, 248; July, 252; August, 228; September, 208; October, 141; November, !)4; December, 88; total, 2,740; average per hen, 137 2-3; profit on eggs over cost of production, $34.37. Fed, in morning, mash of 1-3 shorts and 2-3 corn meal, giving just what tkey would eat up clean; at noon, light feed of wheat, scattered in straw; at night, a little corn. My hens weighed about !) pounds in good laying condition." While the foregoing results are go:»d, and indeed, much better than is realized from the average farm poultry, still we are satisfied the feeding was too heavy for Plymouth Rocks both in quantity and fat producing qualities. There was entirely too much corn in morning feed, one-third corn meal is as much as should be ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 25 June 1898

12 fIARKET REVIEW. SEATTLE. Jobbing quotations; what produce is sell ing at in round lots: The produce market is quiet. Strawber lies have been very plentiful HHs past week, so much so as to overstock the market. And the quality has been poor, too. The copious rains covered them with sand and dirt and made them in poor shape to be used. The price is about the same, 60@76c. Native cherries are coming in freely; Ore gon currants, $1.25 per box; hot house toma toes, 12ic California peaches, 90c per box. Old potatoes are almost worthless unless they are fancy stock. Potatoes—Native, $7@11; Burbauks, $9 @11; rose, $7@B. New potatoes, lc per lb. Celery, 35@40c per doz; lettuce, 35c; rad ishes, 10c; new onions, $l@l.lo per hundred; new cabbage, l^c per lb for native; parsnips, per sack, 75@90c; cauliflower, $1 per doz; rhubarb, He; Walla Walla asparagus, ft per 15-lb box; hothouse cucumbers, 50@(55c; gooseberries, 2jc; new turnips, l()c per dozen bunches; California cherries, 25@75c; green...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 25 June 1898

■pring lambs, $<>(?/(U>o. Wool —The week's market has failed to develop any new features. More inquiry from eastern mills has come forward, while little is heard from mills in the west. Sales do not compare favorably with tTiose of the previous week, actual business showing a falling off. This is probably due to the firmer attitude of sellers, and the tendency to retain wools for higher prices. Better prices are now being paid for wools in the territories by local buyers than the same wool could be sold for heie in the mar ket. Sales have ruled light, notwithstanding that opportunities are offered to buy at bar gain, prices. Scoured wools are not selling as freely as during the week previous, with little accession to the demand looked for un til August in either scoured or pulled wools. The receipts of wool are increasing daily and indications all point to an active season. As compared with previous years, receipts Where Do You Come In? Because your dealer is a nice man and...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 25 June 1898

14 FRUIT. Traffic Manager Campbell, of the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company recently re ceived a letter from a prominent produce man in Minneapolis, J. <i. Potter, that touches a point of great interest to northwestern fruit growers. The writing of this letter was sug gested by a visit from Industrial Agent Jud son, who is now 7 in the East, in the interest of O. K. & N. experiment fanning. The ques tion of unsatisfactory returns on fruit sent east to market was considered, and Mr. Tot ter writes these pertinent words about it: "Now, I have been in the business here for nearly twenty years, am serving my sixth term as president of the produce exchange, and am intimately acquainted with every lirni here, who are receivers of that class of goods, and I do not believe that there is one in the lot that would not use his best efforts to do full justice to any shipper. While it is true that some concerns have a greater outlet than others, and are, therefore, in a better pos...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 25 June 1898

i'ALPHA-DE LAVAL" CREAM SEPARATORS. -/yr'jjjL-. De lißTal Alpha vl] (MM "Baby"Cream Sepa f? 11. lilW i ra*orß were first and Tr 3 IWM^ 13 have ever been kept f§H|^^^t)est an(* cheapest. They are jHPStJBL guaranteed superior to all Imitations and infringe g^gS| ments. Endorsed by all au ywiliß^m thorities. More than 125,000 AIMJsSB \ in use. Sales ten to one of all //F&SffiJiracl others combined. All styles II find sizes —$50.- to $225. --1/ PIJBI\ Save $5.- to $10.- per cow V>. Vw9By!\ per year over any sotting 1 system, and $3.- to Jlllsßmw $•"'•" ilor cow Por "^SIIIIkI^^ year over anY *mi"' -^iNlHDfeS^^. tating 1 separator. New and improved logue containing a 'fund of yip-to-date dairy information. THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR GO. Randolph & Canal Sts.i I 74 Cortiandt Sthee CHICAGO I NEW YORK,. Aggers & Parker Produce and Commission. Cash paid for POULTRY and EGGS, also all Produce shipped to our Alaska Branch. All consignments receive prompt attention. 911JWestern!Avenue...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 25 June 1898

16 TWO CHAMPIONS.. QSMJOOOOO'm^v^'v L^ all m"\ tJlthO 1 I^l I i- D «"^ *tC t*~^\ V^v\\\\wll THE WHEELS WILL NOT LIFT FROM THE GROUND. '^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 7>" Champion Draw Cut Mower. Champion Wobble Gear Mower. Adapted to prairie on straight smooth cutting. . Adapted to cutting in timbered sections where there are some stumps. ■ ■ . -' " . ;.V;.^.'r.r, ■ _, • The Two Best Mowers on Earth! Write F A Tso Cac^Xe of New Champion Binder "% and ,- MITCHELL, LEWIS & STAYER CO.,' —~ p-^11^,™..,.,, The Milwaukee Leads! > I > *^"^Q^stf^^^^^^^^^ Jto^ir <Jr3rSß rill WAI BINDER. . . Furnished in three cut widths, 5 foot, 6 foot or 7 '.'-.■ «*■ niLWAUKEE fIOWER. Steel is the principal material in the Milwaukee. Furnished in four cut widths; < foot, 5 foot, 6 L hd ercak SvSs rCr^er any mla^ S^'tioßT 'o Matchless S'ustment WEIGHT binder as STRONG as heavy biuders. Direct 1 DRAFT is reduced to the lowest point . Each ma"hfne fS listed? Combination reel and '■ pvpr rpflphpd hv nnr p»...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 July 1898

Mnch And jamge /$* <$f ISSUED EVERY WEEK Ik- V tt,- - —i— IT Vol. 4, No. 14 4| Largest Assortment in the Pacific Northwest of t j AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS I 3 Embracing the Most Popular Approved Lines. £» 1 EVERYTHING THAT A FARHER NEEDS. | I What do You Think of This: ' I "3 "Baby" De l.aval Hand Separators, Capacities Increased 42*0^ 'Iff 1 IfUDfOVC " YOUf DiilflCS. C" *^H •• • Than Before .. . mA _» fact is too well known. Storekeepers all over the country are feL WKL HrZ^^^^^^p^B now actually obliged to turn down FARM BUTTER, because Bp» ■^^ {■Byi y '- *•- j»T^lBBB3 Iff^S^**' stantlttrcl °f the public taste, and ere long it will In- Impossible to "*jß Baby No. Guaranteed 350 pounds per hour. .["TOniTl. "^^v^^i^^iSßlMHfc sell anything but Separator butter. As a result of this latest B^ " * * •» ••< ioi r. lSJMi^^Hvw I***-^ ,^^^^feM^3^,'-C^i their milk cows, which means that they are going backward In- •m^l Baby No. oor humming bird— Guaranteed 175 pounds per hour. i*'V ' j^^...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 July 1898

I The Wind Bloweth Where it Listethl TIIEKUSSELrcOMPOUNDTEAC^N ""' fSS ] ENGINE is the most powerful Engine built. FRIEND WIND STACKER it does not, for « It saves one-third to one-half in fuel and we regulate the blasts to blow where they < water, is of less weight than the single cylin- ■ will do the most good. Our Machines for ; der style, and the price is right. If you con- 1898 are models of perfection. They are built : template buying an ENGINE, BOILER, especially for the Pacific Coast trade, have THRESHER SAW MILL or HORSE extra large shoe and are substantial in all POWER write for our 1898 catalogue, and their parts. The CYCLONE will thresh the « when in Portland call and see us and examine fastest, clean the best, run the lightest and . our line of machinery. last the longest. If You Contemplate Buying, Write us for Catalogue. : Russell & Co., Portland, Oregon. 320-324 Belmont Street, 160-166 East First Street. Purebred Jersey Cattle and Berkshire Swine .... M. HORAN,...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 July 1898

RANCH AND RANGE- Vol. 4, No. 14 OBSERVATIONS AND DEDUCTIONS Concerning Western Washington, Its Products, Soil, Cli mate, Industries, Scenery, Etc. The trip from Seattle to Blame, over the Orea< Northern railway, is always interest ing, but at this season of the year is es pecially Inspiring. The journey of nearly one hundred and fifty miles extends across four counties unexcelled anywhere, unrivalled even perhaps, not alone for beauty of scene but for bounty of natural resource. Strange alliterations constantly intrude themselves upon the mind as one sits hour afte* hour gaaing out upon the passing scene. Fish, Fruit and Hocks; grass, grain and gold; ships, soil and shingles; and various other rythmical combinations crowd each other upon the tongue as the eye, restless under the sur rounding spell, turns from the Sound on the left across the fields of waving oats, or for ests of giant trees to the great mountains rich in minerals two score or more of miles away to our right. Uren...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 July 1898

4 rivers, valuable forests, facilities for market in«i their product and good school and social advantages comprise happy conditions for in* dustrions people, llun all this country di rectly adjacent to this part of the Great Northern railway ought to be an Inviting place to the man seeking a home. W. <!. (SAUNCE. A FRUIT RANCH. Productive Walla Walla valley, one of the most fertile and oldest settled districts of this state, has many tine farms. I'jton a re cent visit to Walla Walhf the editor enjoyed the privilege of a visit to one of its most representative fruit ranches, that of W. S. Offner, a horticulturist well-known to our \V. S. Offnkr. readers throughout the Northwest. It is prettily located within one-half mile of the city limits and reached by an easy drive of a few moments. It seems hard to believe that seven years ago Mr. Offner purchased here a then com paratively raw tract of land, consisting of !)0 acres, and within that period has completed such remarkable trans...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 July 1898

HOW AND WIIV TO THIN FRUIT. We said a tew words last week about thin ning fruit We give below some of the ad vantagei or disadvantages of doing this, how and when to do it, etc. The U. s. Depart ment of Agriculture has made and compiled careful investigations along this line, and we gain this information from their fanners' bulletin No. T.l: Thinning the fruit of trees that have a tendency to overbear is recommended very generally and practiced very little. Few ex tended experiments in thinning rmits have been reported by the experiment stations, but where thinning has been followed sys tematically for a number of years in commer cial orchards, it has been found profitable. The number of fruits produced per tree may be regulated in two general ways: Bj pruning away a part of the branches to pre vent the formation of too much fruit, or by picking off the superfluous fruits soon after they have formed. With such fruits as grapes, raspberries, blackberries, and the like, the former met...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 July 1898

r» cents for the Victoria, giving a ne( gain duo !o thinning of 20 centl and 41 cents, respect ively. Another very marked result obtained from the test with plums was the decrease of brown rot in case of the thinned fruit. On the thinned half of the (luei tree US per cent, of the fruit was affected with rot. and on the unthinned half 42 per cent.; on the thinned half of the Victoria tree 20 per cent., and on the unthinned half 4(1 per cent. (Mil. r T<>MtN With Apple*. The New York State Station has recently begun an experiment with several varieties of apples. The first year the thinning was done when the largest apples were about 1^ inches in diameter. One Baldwin tree was thinned by removing all wormy and other wise inferior fruit and leaving one apple to a cluster, a similar tree left unthinned being used as a check. The unthinned tree yielded 32 J bushels of marketable fruit, and the thinned tree only 27| bushels, or about 14 per cent, less than the unthinned tree. The amo...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 July 1898

ported give little data upon which to base such statements. There are certain things, however, which must be considered in any <;:se. Thinning should be delayed until there is no further danger of premature dropping of fruit from lack of pollination, the effect oi frosts. Of other accidental causes. It should be done, however, before the fruit biJ cdiues so large as to tax the tree. The usual recommendations are to thin plums when about half grown and before the pits harden; p( aches, when the size of small hickory nuts, or when half an inch in diameter; applet, when the size of hickory nuts to 1J inclh s in diameter. The amount of fruit removed will depend largely on the previous pruning, and on the age, size and variety of the tree. The fruits should be left far enough apart so as not to touch each other, and it is often recom mended to leave them from 4 to 0 inches apart. Fruit should be picked by hand, the wormy, diseased and otherwise inferior fruits being removed. Mechanica...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 July 1898

B Ranch and Range ISSUED KVKRY SATURDAY. In the Interests of the Farmers, Horticulturists, and stockmrn of Washington 1 Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Vtuh, British Columbia. published by THE RANCH AND RANGE COMI'AXV. Conducted by MILLKK FKKKMAN Assistant Ki.itor - H. M. WALLACE, H. A. Editorial (MOW, - * ■ SeattU>>WllMl>- BI'BINKSB OFFICES: Seattle, . . - HUM PtoßMt building. Spokane, - - suite F Hypotheek hank building. BUIWOBIPTION, IN ADVANCE, ■ PER YEAR. Address all communications to Ranch and Range, 315-IUB Pioneer building, Seattle, Washington. Another year of educational work is closed at the State College at Pullman and another graduating class has gone forth to put their education Into practical use. There were 70 graduates in all in the college, 1") of whom were from the Agricultural College and School of Science. We have a very high ap preciation of the value of such an education along agricultural lines, and we hope a great share, if not all of these graduates, will u...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 July 1898

northwest states by Mitchell, Lewis & Stayer Co. One of the orchard cultivators is shown ill work in the orchard of W. S. OtVner in the illustrations of his farm this week. -?». -^. -^. Foil gave Woll's pair and Dr. Tassell's a very neat notice. —L. K. Cogswell. Olympia. DILWORTH BROS.' STOCK PLEASES. Spokane, Wash., June 24, 1898. Editor Ranch and Range: We recently sold and shipped to John EL Taylor, of Mon teeano, a very fine bull calf, "Wynooche's Scribe, No. 51055." As you will see by the enclosed letter recently received from Mr. Ta\lor, he is pretty well satisfied with his purchase. If the calf does not develop into an extra good bull, it is not because he is tacking in good blood. His dam is Of am of Spokane, No, 108068, a granddaughter of Tormentor and Selita J.. No. 321N4. wth a seven-day butter test of over 25 pounds. Cream has given as high as 30 pounds milk in one day and her average test is over 7 per cent, butter fat. You know what our gravel pasture is like. The ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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