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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1905

i ais of frying pan or sauce pan be t ,-c putting away. Wash out the tea i wels in the water you used to scald , o dishes (if you used a second dish „ n) and rinse with clean hot water. I ing in the sun to dry, if possible. A little ammonia and sapolio once ■ day on the kitchen table makes it a A-ays sweet, and if you want to v liten boards rub over with the in s le of a lemon which has been g aeezed. I always save them. White , i cloth on the table cloth saves a i of work, if you prefer it. The Waste at the Flour Barrel. After the bread is made, in a great n my families, nothing more seems i be thought of it. In addition to t ying the dried sifted crumbs, which I suggested in The Ranch, there are 6 , veral ways of saving and making over stale bread. Here is a nice one: Crumb Loaf. Two beaten eggs, one cupful sweet j ilk — a pinch of salt, and a table s.oonful of sugar. Stir in enough Ii cad crumbs to make a thin batter and add flour enough to thicken like corn bread, and one teaspo...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1905

10 POULTRY ——^— H. L. BLANCHAKD Communication* for this department are solicited Personal experience* detailed and questions prove of great benefit Write to H. L.. ninnchard at Hadlock. W»nh.. or direct to The Ranch. Seattle. Squabs for Profit. (By E. L. Reber.) Spring is the time of the year when your squab breeders will do their very best work. They enter into the spirit of the warm sunny days an>l busy themselves all day long, bath ing, cooing, love-making, nest-build ing and feeding the young. Many breeders make it a point to save their spring young for breeders, believing that these young are so much better fed by the parent birds, mature there fore much earlier, and remain through life the strongest and hardiest birds of all the year. This is certainly true of the east, where the weather is so severe. But spring, while it brings more squabs, is a time when one should see to it that the squab houses are kept free of disease. Warm weather encourages lice. See that your house ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1905

2^^SfJ&JjflH|L sexton announc- Tl ed a death in _^ J —^IP*T"| the church bell - |i !^g^=^»Ji3 I the life that was gone. • People expected, then, to live to old age, and speculation at the . first tap of the bell took a narrow range including only those who had lived the al lotted time. There is no rea '; son why people should not have the same expectancy of age to-day, except for the neglect and abuse of the one organ on which all the other organs depend— stomach. Dr. Pierces Golden Med j. ical Discovery enables men t and women to be strong and healthy, by curing diseases of ' the stomach (and other or „'. gans of digestion and nutri tion), which prevent the I proper nourishment of the body. "I had been sick for two years . with indigestion and nervous de- JU i bility, and had taken j Atk^k medicine from my fam ■""jy-er aH* I ily doctor for a long time M i-jßSl^^. without much benefit," JWF wrtsfW writes Mrs. W. H. Pee- X/ \jL*Zi bles, of Lucknow, S. C. JT aJg&\ Was induced ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1905

12 THE FIELD Fertilizers for Potatoes. John A. Anderson, of Juanitja., writes: "1 have got some new up land that I wish to put into potatoes. What kind of fertilizer and how much should 1 put on, and how should it be used? Will the ground be left in as poor condition after the crop is raised as it was before?" It is necessary for potatoes to have a complete fertilizer —that is, one containing phosphoric acid, nitrogen and potash. In most of the soil in the Puget Sound country the potash is especially lacking, and for potatoes and other root crops fertilizer con taining a large percentage of potash is necessary because, if there is an excess of nitrogen, the crop grows all to tops and possesses no tubers. In answer to your second question as to whether the ground will be left in as poor a condition after the crop is raised as it was: This is hardly likely, although if you take off in your crop of potatoes as much as you put on in the fertilizer your ground will be in the same conditi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1905

; auding his grass customers. Every inner should know that the amount grass seed to sow on an acre is ■ sulated by more or less well-de -1 ned rules, based upon general ex >rience and varying somewhat lo [ uiy. Thus, it is said that three bush eia an acre should be planted of red r ,p, orchard-grass, and English rye ,ass; one-half to one bushel of tim othy; and fifteen to twenty-five pounds : alfalfa. These rules, however, do ot take into consideration the qual y of the seed used. Assuming, for vample, that three bushels of first ( iality seed is meant, then an in creased amount should be sown when iferior seed is used. The standard v eight for orchard-grass is fourteen ;,mnds the bushel and of this about nine pounds will grow, the remainder being chaff, dead seeds and weed seeds. [I the seed purchased has a lower : ermination, say fifty per cent, in- Head of eighty per cent, then only a little more than 5% pounds of pure and good seed will be found in every I ushel. Again, if th...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1905

74 LIVE STOCK Law Regarding Sheep Scabbies. A subscriber in Sunnyside writes The Ranch for information as to the powers of the sheep inspector when he finds a band that has been ex posed to sheep scab but as yet have not shown any signs of it. He has a large number of fine ewes in the band, who are due to lamb inside of two weeks, and states the inspector has ordered the sheep dipped at once. We will quote from the law those pas sages that would apply to the case as soon as scabbies appeared among the appeared among the sheep, if at all: Section 4744, of Pierces Washing ton Code, page 799, says: "Any per son owning or having charge of any sheep infected with scab or scabbies or any infectious or contagious dis ease, shall keep the same and all sheep with which such sheep have been in contact, and the band or herd with which said sheep have been Kept, secure from contact with other sheep, and shall not drive or permit the same to go upon any public road or highway, or any enclosed or...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1905

lambs contract the disease from their nithers, and the damp state of the , ,und is likely to encourage it. The I i\ plan is to have every sheep t i rough and thoroughly pare down the \, of, Keeping the walls of the hoof level with the inner part so that the pressure is equally distributed over t ;,,. foot. In the case of a diseased ( >i the foul part must be well cut p ,ay, care being taken not to cause t) seeding; well dress with a caustic ii ixture, so as to prevent proud flesh growing, and to stimulate the vascu lar parts to secrete healthy horn. If the weather is inclined to be wet a strong dressing is necessary, such as p : iriate of antimony applied with a fi it her, and again equal parts of hy ( l;;)chloric acid and tincture of myrrh; a milder dressing is a strong solution oi sulphate of copper, and tincture of a >es or friar's balsam is milder still. All these are useful if applied with discretion according to the severity of the case. A useful application as we' as a ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1905

1« The lj lj Ia r will do it --ajijSJH^VV.', "V -^j§ffiik What more can we say? This fully covers the ground. Now, Mr. Dairyman, I ' -&:^}^W^Bt: *'*'• -" f djsSl^S&Kl it is up to you to make the move You say that you would like to try some other make '-'^^^SlS^^m^^^^^^m^^^S that someone has told you is better than the Tubular. All right, by all means try it. 'l^w^iKHHSi But in doing so do not be onesided. Give the Tubular a voice in the matter. It needs ;' ;^^g^Sfej|ffijl^^SßßpiS[3^ but little attention, takes up but little space and it will tell its own story without our •''^^ij^BlP^Kili^^^^^^l^f aid. We have placed Tubulars alongside of other makes several times this season and ' i^ "^WBWaHsIH fie Ks&rf they won out in every instance, and will do so in your case. We will give you the 'W-f W't iIESi "'"'•" W H names and addresses of where these trials took place. You want a clean skimmer f I™. V ; ;|^ .^f^^p first of of course- Well, THE TUBULAR WILL DO IT. You want one...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1905

THE RANCH . VOL. XXII. NO. 7. Strawberry Nomenclature (F. A. Cowell, Lakebay.) That the strawberry, under different soil, climate and tillage conditions, varies widely is well known, but a Puset Sound "originator" recently did himself proud by asserting that while these had much to do with the behav ior of a variety, "surroundings" had still more to do with the matter, and essayed to illustrate the point by stat ins that with him and a neighbor the Kansas was worthless until the neigh bor chanced to plant another sort next to it. This was what he meant by "surroundings." He went so far as to assert that the Kansas is a perfect blossom sort. I never grew the Kan sas, but all the catalogs in which I have seen it listed say it is a pistil late and any child who knows what a strawberry is knows an imperfect blos som requires fertilization by a bi sexual sort. "Surroundings" is good. This "breeder" went further and accused me of copying descriptions of blossoms of varieties on my place f...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1905

2 material used in spraying. This ex plains why some have sprayed with kerosene emulsion and made a com plete .success, while others have made an absolute failure with the same spray. Our best entomologists were puzzled at this difference in results. The honor of having found out the cause of this diversity and the way to remedy it belongs to Prof. Woodworth and his able assistant, Prof. Clarke, both of the California experiment sta tion at Berkeley. They were ap pealed to to do something to check the ravages of this insect, for seventy five per cent of the peaches were ren dered unsaleable in some sections of ihe state. Accordingly, Prof. Clarke was aent into the worst infected regions and remained there several months, when at last his investiga tions were crowned with entire suc cess. It must be remembered that the larva of this moth winters in the crotches of the peach trees. The old theory was that if we sprayed with kerosene emulsion the mixture would penetrate these winter qu...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1905

THE RANCH Office: 376 Column Building MiI. IKK I RKKMAN Editor and Proprietor Associate Editors F. WALDEN, H. L. BLANCHARD MRS. S. a. WEBSTER. Issued the First and Fifteenth Each Month Subscription, in advance, one year 50 cents; six months, 30 cents. If on time, subscriptions will be $1. Seattle subscrib ers are required to pay $1.00 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commissions and sal aries paid to hustlers. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notified in wr'tlng. by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer as we cannot find it on our list from the name alone on th« paper. We must have both name and ad dress, and all arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expira tion is shown on your paper by address label containing your name. Failing to receive the paper regul...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1905

4 HORTICULTURE r. WALDEN The question has been asked how a smudge in an orcnard keeps the frost from killing the fruit. By many it is supposed to be the heat in the smudge that protects tne fruit. If a cloud should hang over the orchard it would have the same effect. During the day time the earth absorbs heat from the sun and this is done to some extent even when it is cloudy. As soon as the sun goes down this ab sorbed heat begins to radiate trom the earth and this goes on during the entire night. Now, heat will radi ate much faster on a clear night than when it is cloudy. The clouds hang ing over the earth check this radia tion. If we could stretch a canvass over the orchard it would have the same effect. In some of the orange orchards in California frost has been pevented by putting a lath netting over the trees and this was effectual when the lath were an inch apart in this net work. Now, if we can make a smudge and get it to hang over the orchard it has the same effect—lt pre v...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1905

ruget Sound. As you Bay, it colors better than most sorts, and it Is In this direction that the red apples fail us on this side of thts mountains. Yet I am convinced, how ever, that with the use of water In the growing and ripening season (Irrigation), to unlock the mineral elements in the soil, we would have little or no reason to complain on this score. But as orcharding is carried on here with us the Arkansas Black gives promise of being one, If not the very bent of red winter apples to grow. The tree is a strong healthy grower and an early and luge bearer. At Richmond Beach, in this county, four-year-old trees are producing two boxes to the tree. J. P. CAS3. Seattle, Wash. * * ♦ It is with great pleasure that the following letter is given to the readers of The Ranch. Prof. Fletcher was a 1 w years since professor of horticul ture in the Washington agricultural colleffd. Those of us who knew him regretted to lose him from this state as we did to lose such men as Spill man, Piper,...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1905

6 THE DAIRY Experiments Regarding Tuberculosis. The bureau of animal industry has been making experiments concerning the infectiousness of human tubercu losis for cattle, and also those experi ments concerning the comparative vir ulence of human and bovine tubercle bacilli for other animals, and the re sults may be briefly summarized as follows: Nine fresh cultures of tuber culosis from as many different cases of that disease in human beings were isolated; four of these cultures were isolated from children affected with generalized tuberculosis. None of the cultures isolated from adults exhibited a degree of pathogenic power for cat tle which was in any way comparable to that usually manifested by the bo vine tubercle bacilli. Of the four cultures isolated from children, however, two produced a generalized tuberculosis in calves af ter subcutaneous inoculation, and the lesions produced were quite as severe as those produced by a fresh culture of the bovine tubercle bacillus which wa...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1905

, lyes during the first year: A por ri.lge made from meal mixed in the i,'i'llowing proportions: 100 lbs. ground oil cake, 25 lbs. ground flaxseed and 50 lbs. low grade flour. Make the por ridge by mixing the ingredients to .. i her with warm water to about the iinsistency of cream. Owing to the rength of the food the calves should n ot be fed much of it at first, but as they become accustomed to it, feed a larger quantity if necessary. Manner of Milking the Cow. According to the Irish World, M. Le- I nitre says it ta admitted that the ,l(ier of a good cow may before the .peration of milking contain three „aarts of milk already formed, while If the animal is well treated the udder may yield from ten to fifteen quarts. •The manner of milking exerts a great influence upon the Proportion of the fatty materials contained in the fluid. The milk extracted from the first two teatß is generally richer in fat than hat of the two milked in the last place, and the richness will be greater if w...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1905

8 First Btreet, Portland; 112 Second ave nue south, Seattle. The Seattle branch of the De Laval Dairy Supply Co. was formerly the Merz Dairy Sup ply Co. Business Necessitates Enlargement. Word comes that the creamery at Lynden, Whatcom county, one of the largest and best butter factories in northwestern Washington, is to be greatly improved and enlarged. The directors have placed an order for be tween |1100 and $1200 worth of new machinery, consisting of a twenty horse-power boiler, a ten-horse-power engine, a seventeen-hundred-gallon tank, a five-hundred-gallon ripener, and other utensils. This creamery is in the heart of the richest farming section in the county and business has been increasing so fast that the larger capacity has become necessary. At Emmet, Idaho, the creamery, which has been idle some time, has resumed business with Otto Wilhelm as manager. The big creamery plant at Lewiston, Idaho, was scheduled to start business this week. Beet Sugar Factory in Yakima. That th...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1905

There are a great many hungry hearted r,-omen who would attend a baby sale if li.ibies were ever offered for sale, because tiiere are a great many wives who love children and have been told by physi cians that they can never hope to nurse a child of their own. Some of these women who have used Dr. Pierces Favorite Prescription for the cure of womanly ills have been made happy mothers as a result of the cure of womanly disease and the building up of the general health. Doctor Pierces Favorite Prescription makes weak women strong and sick women well. It establishes regularity, dries weakening drains, heals inflamma tion and ulceration and cures female weakness. " I wrote to you some time ago to get informa tion about my case," says Mrs. Mary Lee Flan ary, of Dryde.i, Va. "I was troubled with female weakness and pains. Received answer from you, advising me to take Doctor Pierces Favorite Prescription and ' Golden Medical Di» covery. 1 I took two bottles of 'Favorite Pre scription' and ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1905

10 POULTRY H. L. BI^ANCHARD Communications for this department are solicited. Personal experiences detailed and questions prove of great benefit. Write to H. L. Blanchaid at Hadlook, Wash., or direct to The Ranch, Seattle. Hens that Break Eggs. A correspondent asks: "Is there any way of preventing a sitting hen breaking eggs; have got one sitting now and every few days I find a broken egg. Is this preventable or is it due to natural and unavoidable clumsi ness on the part of the hen?" There are several points to consider in this case. (1) The eggs may have very tender shell; (2) the nest may be shaped so that the eggs pile up and are more easily broken; (3) the nest may be too deep, so that the hen is obliged to jump down on the eggs; (.4) the hen may be naturally clumsy. The latter is the most frequent cause as broody hens seldom break eggs in order to eat them. A hen always moves her eggs daily into different positions, and if tender in the shell and the nest is crowded there is d...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1905

"Vgw^nig^ COSTS NOTHING TO FEED F^holly^ 1 HOLLY CHICK FEED i m V^ '"■-'■:*- £//)m Mr- L - W- Smith of Wenatchee, Wash., hit tlio nail on the head when he said: Kr r-ffljVV ■' ••-"flfflßf "I consider your Holly Chick Feed as against old methods; to be free, I saved enough Chicks this year to KS j^^A^^fev'j'^j pay for all the Holly Chick Feed I used." SFflp 4 ]j*£ 1""^ l'*8a You will save enough chicks by feeding Holly Chick Feed to more than pay the coßt of the Food. '■ft ; $mW>® Sm J I Success in the poultry business does not depend so much on bow many chicks you can hatch, as on how many I 7»i .^ahkJX? ti I yoU can raise and on kee Pin » them growing healthy and well feathered. W^^^S^S^^^Bl There are many Chick Foods on the market, but Holly Chick Food is like the others only in price; IP?'-. •'•; rr i.'jffll' ' they all cost about the same, so that it will pay you to get the best. Insist on getting Holly Chick Feed in kHECHLILLTCS the original bags. Every bag is sealed with a ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1905

12 THE, FIELD Peas. Peas do best in a clay loam. The soil should be well worked, and if at all sour beneficial results will be ob tained by appplying air slaked lime. Well rotted manure and mixed com mercial fertilizer will also benefit the pea crop immensely. A larger yield and better colored pods will be the result. Many people prefer the dwarf varieties, growing from 12 to 14 inches tall, but those who have once got in the habit of planting the taller growing varieties have found that they are much more satisfactory. They may be easily staked by driving a flat picket crossways in the row about every six feet and then running a heavy twine or light wire from stake to stake. In the family garden this is much more preferable to growing the dwarf varieties, as the peas are more easily picked, yield more abund antly and the pods and peas are of much better size. There are on the market today several varieties that are quite hardy and can be planted as early in the season as it is poss...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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