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Elephind.com contains 116,947 items from Recorder, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Masthead [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

HIGHLAND tfßl RECORDER VOL. 43 . MONTEREY. HIGHLAND COUNTY, VA., FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 1921 NO 1

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
MIX YOUR CROPS TO DODGE HARD TIMES [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

MIX YOUR CROPS TO DODGE HARD TIMES v Don’t put your eggs all in one basket” is the lesson which falling crop prices have taught agriculturists in southern states, say Texas farmers —and one that might well be observed in every state in the Union. Many southern states have “stayed with cotton” through fat and lean years alike—always at a big sacrifice in the end. But—as these pictures show—’midst the cabbages and palms—Texans at least are mixing their crops—but the pojnt is—southern soil will grow most anything if the tillers will give it the opportunity.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
The Society Invasion. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

The Society Invasion. “ -Spike’ Scroggins, the prize-fight announcer, is wearing evening clothes for the first time in his life.” “He looks somewhat embarrassed.” “IS T ot more so than the referee. He was so flabbergasted he addressed ‘Spike’ as ’mister.’ *' Birmingham Age-Herald.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Farm for Sale [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

Farm for Sale For ashort time only, about 250 acres good grass land, six miles west of Hightown, Va., near the S. & P. Pike and 13 miles east of Bartow, W. Ya., also miles east of North Fork Lumber Go’s, railroad which is still coming closer, a good school half m. away on Co. R. The farm lays real nice and is smoothe, practically all enclosed with rail and wire fea *. i, and produces good crops. On this tract of land is a good com ’ortable dwelling house and and all necessary out buildipgs such as 2 good harps, smoke house, spring house, granery, wagon also two empty houses. About 150 acres in good sod, includes meadows and farm fields, balance ip good hard wood and about 30 acres of good spruce timber estimated to cut from 12 to 1500 cords pulp wood. The timber alone is well worth the price of the place. % This farm has on it three orchards all bearing trees, a fine sugar orchard of 500 trees. Last year the farm cut 20 stacks of hay. Seven never failing springs on the p...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
HUGGINS’ WRECKING CREW THE CLASS [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

HUGGINS’ WRECKING CREW THE CLASS Is “The Little Corporal” going to dominate again—this time in baseball instead of world affairs. Miller Huggins, the diminutive leader of the New York anks. has an army of ball players which threatened to make Tris Speaker’s Cleveland Champs go the limit to win.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
FIGURED IN NAPOLEON 3 LIFE Woman Set Down In History as On* of the Most Beautiful of His * Many Conquests. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

FIGURED IN NAPOLEON 3 LIFE Woman Set Down In History as On* of the Most Beautiful of His * Many Conquests. Napoleon’s life was one of fair women, but among them all few were more beautiful and more heartless than Marguerite Bellisle Foure-. Napoleon saw her in Cairo where she was honeymooning with Lieut. Foures, having accompanied him in disguise on the transport. Napoleon promptly sent Foures to Paris' with alleged important dispatches and began to make love to the bride. He was successful, and she moved to a cottage near the palace. The English captured tier husband and, knowing of Napoleon’s acts in Cairo, they promptly sent Foures back there, knowing lie would seek re\ enge. But he was a drop of water against the power of Napoleon. His wife was given a divorce, and he was sent to an obscure town in rural France. She then began to parade her capture, dressed in costly costumes, wore Napoleon’s picture on a chain about her peck, and was with him constantly. His soldiers dubbed her...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
INGUSH FIRST TO CHEW GUM th.e Year 1635 a Recipe for Its Manufacture Was Published in That Country. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

INGUSH FIRST TO CHEW GUM th.e Year 1635 a Recipe for Its Manufacture Was Published in That Country. Chewing gum Isn’t new, and it Isn’t American In origin, despite the fact that our English cousins keep telling us that gum-chewing is an American habit. In fact, they originated it themselves. John Bate, an English writer, gave a recipe for chewing in 1635. He called it “mouth glew.” Here’s the recipe: “Take Islnglasse and steep it in water until such time as you may easily pull it to pieces, put It Into 3 glass or pot well loaded and set it ip halneo; that is, a pot of water on the fire. There let it remain until all, or most part of it, is dissolved; then strain it thorew a wide haire selve; while it is hot, upon another course and close haire seive, and when it is cold it will be like a thick jelly. If you would have tt of a dainty smell and aromatical taste, put into it a little cinnamon bruised, and a little marjerom, and rosemary flowers, while Jt Is dissolving, and if you pleas...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
French Papermaking History. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

French Papermaking History. It was from the early Saracens that the art of papermaking was acquired by the French, and passed on to the other nations of Europe. The earliest papermakers of France were the vassals of the French nobility who pursued their occupation on the estates of their overlords, fabricating the preciqus material required for use by their musters, say the historians. production, together with that of the monks of the various monasteries, represented the only paper production activity of France, as It emerged from the gloom of the medieval ages. The first specimen of paper to be found in France bearing an authentic date is a document purporting to be one of the bonds given to the Jews by a lieutenant of Richard I of England for the purpose of financing his crusade in the Holy land. It is dated 1190 A. D.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Ceylonese Plumbago. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

Ceylonese Plumbago. Plumbago, Ceylon’s most Important mineral product, is known all over the world for its luster, lubricating, polishing and binding qualities. In appearance it is a strong black crystallne. There are now about I,(XX) plumbago mines in Ceylon, including all the shallow pits, open works and deep mines. The depth varies from a few yards to as much as 700 feet. Most of the mines are worked by natives, the only important one controlled by Europeans being the Medapola. In the majority of the mines the only machinery used is the “dabare.” This consists of a long wooden barrel with handles at each end. A rope is wound around this with a bucket fastened to each end. It Is worked by seven or eight men turning the handle.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Time Has Brought Changes. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

Time Has Brought Changes. When I was a young lady I was extremely thin and tall, and very sensitive In regard to my figure. Onr club was about to give a masquerade which I was anxious to attend, but realizing how hard it would be for me to disguise myself, and yet wishing to represent something original, I remarked this to a young man at the club. He looked at me with a smile, and in the presence of all the other said, in a most sarcastic voice, “Well, why don’t you wear a rubber on your head npd go as a lead pencil?” Oh, if he coufll only me now, I know ho would say, “put a couple of hoops around your waist and go as a barrel.”—Exchange,

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
PERIODS IN AGE OF EARTH Figures Compiled by Geologist Are Certainly Interesting Though Perhaps a Little Startling. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

PERIODS IN AGE OF EARTH Figures Compiled by Geologist Are Certainly Interesting Though Perhaps a Little Startling. A geologist describes by means of a graphic chart the comparative lengths of the different periods of the age of the earth. He places the age of the earth arbitrarily at 72,000,000 years, represented by a clock dial of 24 hours —3,000,000 years to each hour. Oit the above basis the first six hours of the clock represent Azoic time, the earliest conjectural period of the earth’s formation —18,000,000 years; the next six hours Eozoic and the next eight Paleozoic.time —15,000,000 and 24,000,000 years, respectively —periods of mineral and vegetable formations. In Ihe next three hours animal life developed—Mesozoic time, 9,000,000 years—that is, from the twentieth to’the twenty-third hour. Thus the last hour of the 24 —3,000,000 years of geologic time —represents Neozoic time, which includes# the appearance of human life in the Quaternary period. This last division of the 24...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
POPULAR SPORT IN PANAMA Duel to the Death Between Bull and Jaguar Is Considered Height of Entertainment, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

POPULAR SPORT IN PANAMA Duel to the Death Between Bull and Jaguar Is Considered Height of Entertainment, Tbe Panamaniac who is a real sport delights in nothing so much as a tight between a jaguar and a bull. One must visit the isthmus to see this particular kind of sport. An enormous cage, strongly built of scantlings and iron bars, is placed lit the center of the ring ordinarily used for bull fights. A bull is placed inside of it and presently one of the huge South American cats is wheeled up ip a smaller cage and introduced into the barred inclosure. The latter is about ten feet high, with twice that length and breadth, In the fight which then ensues the bull is victorious usually. Not more than once in ten such contests does the jaguar prove the victor. This would not be the case if the animals were not restricted to so narrow a space; but the big cat, being obliged to rely mainly upon its activity, does not have a fair chance. Nevertheless, the duel greatly delights the spectato...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Fish Thrive Under Water, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

Fish Thrive Under Water, Water never gets colder than about 39 degrees. So no matter how thick the day, and no matter how thick the ice upon the stream or lake, the fishes are enjoying a temperature of about 39 degrees, and they move about in the water apd gather supplies very well at that temperature. Through the clear lee one may see fish with their backs against it, where the temperature must be 32 degrees, and if you strike the ice above them lightly they dart away with pretty good speed. If you will strike the ice immediately above them with the back of. an ax, or a sledge hammer, you will kill the fish. The concussion does the business and the fish will turn up its white belly upward, always. It is a common enough thing in some regions for the boys to kill the fish through the ice, and then to cut a hole and get them out.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
The Tunnel’s Part in Progress. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

The Tunnel’s Part in Progress. In the history of civilization the tunnel has played a mighty part. In Europe the St. Golbard tunnel through the Alps is famous; it connects Gosehenen with Airoto, in Switzerland, and is over nine miles long. The Simplon, which also penetrates the Alps, is reckoned one of the seven modern wonders of the world; it is 12V2 miles in length. Still another Alpine bore is the Wasserfluh, two miles in extent from entrance to entrance. Another notable tunnel is the Khojak pass, in India. Among the important American tunnels is that which penetrates the Cascade mountains, in Washington; the Cumberland, under the Cumberland mountains in Tennessee; the Hoosac, in Massachusetts, and the tunnel under the Detroit river.—Harry C. Drum, in Leslie’s.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
A Revolving Door Etiquette. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

A Revolving Door Etiquette. The etiquette of the revolving door lias yet to be standardized. At present there are two schools of opinion on tlie subject. One holds that when a man and a woman reproach a revolving door it is the man’s place to go first, pushing tlie door slowly so as to allow his partner to follow in tlie next compartment without any effort on her part. The other contends that ladies lirst still holds sway. It Is good manners, these theorists say, for the man to step aside, let the woman start the door revolving, and then jump into the compartment behind her. In tins way, it is contended, the man may assume control of tlie door and guide it until the woman ahead of him is safely out. Tlie bitterest rivalry prevails between the two schools. —Argonaut.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
CAT DELIVERED ITS NIESSAG Battle-Scarred Feline Proved It i Least Had the Courage of Its Convictions. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

CAT DELIVERED ITS NIESSAG Battle-Scarred Feline Proved It i Least Had the Courage of Its Convictions. The other night I saw u clever ca He s; 1 1 on the fence in the inoonligß all alone, writes, a correspondent < the Boston Herald. He looked up i the moon and opened his mouth, braced myself for what I believed i he coming, namely, ids effort at sel expression. But no, this was a clev« cat. Like O. Henry, he dealt in clevi surprises. In his attitude there wj something of suspense. My waitli nervous system felt the strain of i Then lie gave voice to a great silenc lie said nothing in a dramatic wa With a self-satisfied smirk on li pussy face he jumped off the fern gracefully and disappeared into tl night, lie was u clever cat. He di the unexpected in an original at artistic way. He annoyed me, for 1 failed to live up to my conception i cats, yet I felt a certain admiratic for him. The next night another cat sat t tlie fence. Tills was a great ca though ids appearance was fa...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
WHERE HUSTLE IS UNKNOW Mallorca Justly Entitled to the A pellation Given to It, “Island of Calm.” [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

WHERE HUSTLE IS UNKNOW Mallorca Justly Entitled to the A pellation Given to It, “Island of Calm.” Mrllorca, a tiny speck of an islau In the Mediterranean, is a land < pence and ease. A great painter an writer who visited the island, hr christened it “The Island of Calm because there everyone moves, rest talks, walks and conducts his cour ships as if the day had 48 hours, tli mile about 16,000 feet, and the spa of human life 700 years, so little hast do they make in living and enjoyin life. These people who take life s leisurely, are not lazy, shiftless or ui pleasant in personal appearance ( manner. They are intelligent, hones capable of work, sober and econon leal. These characteristics, preserve throughout centuries of uninterrupte peace- ami tranquility, have mac them peaceable, trusting and hour loving. The men are of mediui height, strong and agile. And as for the women, they po sess the same lovely skin as tl women of North America, features t tf scluptured by Phidi...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Little Sign of Culture in Speech [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

Little Sign of Culture in Speech Americans are known the worl around for their short and nasal a and many have been misled into broa er.ing all their a’s to prove their ct ture. Hut the original sound was t in ‘•far" and “palmit is the fir sound uttered by infants and still tl most general sound of the letter t the continent of Europe. The “al sound was the most frequent for tl letter In the earliest English or Angl Saxon, still considered the model ar best usage in our language. The a “ask” may be pronounced like the In “hare” ar “at,” but, according to tl Encyclopedia Americana, “with ll majority of good speakers” it shou ho akin to the “ah” sound. Best a thoritles hold that the excessive use.' the short a is most common in Ame ica, outside the greater part of Ne England. It is tints a provincialisi whereas the broadened a’s may be i dlcstive of travel, familiarity with tl languages of Europe, and associate with cultured people.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
“Connoisseur” and “Dilettante.” [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

“Connoisseur” and “Dilettante.” The connoisseur is “one wl knows,” as opposed to the dilsttan( who only “thinks he knows.” T connoisseur is cognizant of the tn principles of art, and through t knowledge! is competes* *o pass critical judgment concerning any ai particularly of painting, sculpture unis’c. He is of a JdjrtwM* "mde thj (ho amateur, and more nearly a proaches the artist, whose rules of t lion he is familiar with, but does n practice. The dilettante may he lovt-r of (lie fine arts, science or 1' terr, and may pursue any one of t arts in a desultory way and for amiii menl. and Lowell says of him: “T main characteristic of the dilettante tha; sort of impartiality that sprin from inertia of mind, admirable f observation, incapable of turning it practical account.”

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Hops Springs Eternal [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 1 April 1921

Hops Springs Eternal Miymc—There! Didn’t I tell y< You a.st when you’d get married ihe viiija board sez “Never!” ' G»*rt—Wait fer the finish. It’s g to spell out “Never fear. You’ll wed soon. ’ —Houston Post.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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