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Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,693 items from Virginia Farm Bureau News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1952

NO. 5 IN A SERIES ON FLUE-CURED TOBACCO ' methods in other areas. Due to the special conditions required for the curing of this type of tobacco, the barns of the Flue-cured district are more complex than those proper o mariagernentgreatly 6 "affect the H of other areas. In constructing their barns, some Flue-cured tobacco growers do quality of the cured leaf. take into account all of the important factors —thus failing to get the best results possible. If the suggestions of Federal and State Agricultural Experiment fife ~ Stations are followed — these growers can take better advantage of their barns' wjiL: p , JjppiL Satisfactory curing equipment and its proper management greatly affect the quality of the cured leaf. The high cost of fuel and fire insurance, and the lower price received for inferior grades, make it financially important for the tobacco grower to successfully cure as many of the leaves hanging in his barn as possible. Every leaf that fails to cure to a high quality m...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1952

4 11 Hour, $5.20 Day on Farm 8 Hour, $10.32 in Industry The hired man on the farm is working from 8.5 to 9.1 hours each day six days a week on the farm for an average weekly wage of $31.20, not including room and board, according to recent figures released by Henry M. Taylor, State Agriculture Department statistician. On the other hand, the figures for industry revealed that the average worker is working eight hours a day for five days a week and taking home about $51.60 per week. The farm operator is working from about the time you can see until the time you can't see each day, and during the harvest season, some of them turn on their tractor lights and keep on going. His average hours however figure between 10.1 to 11.2 hours per day, so says Mr. Taylor. But the only trouble is, the farmer never gets through with his work. The laborer may work his eight or more hours and forget it until the next day, but like the private businessman the farmer usually puts in a few hours thinking ...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1952

February, 1952 Farm Legislation Light During First Few Sessions Legislation which has been con-" sidered of principal interest to farmers has been light through the first three weeks of the new state legislature, according to M. A. Hubbard, executive secretary of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. Hubbard pointed out that the highway load limit increase to 56,000 pounds as recommended by the VFBF has had pressure brought to bear by other interest to try and raise the load higher, but the VFBF stood firm in its position and would not support any legislation providing for limits beyond those acceptable to the Department of Highways. The bill as introduced was drafted accordingly. House bill number 15 by delegate James of Hampton would amend the Milk and Cream Act by increasing its membership to five members, three of whom shall have no connection with the production or distribution of milk. This bill was first referred to the Committee on General Laws but our friends succeeded in ge...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1952

6 Peanut Allotment Decrease Expected A reduction in Virginia peanut acreage allotments has been announced by the USD A but a spokesman for the Virginia Peanut and Hog Growers Association said that it is a strong possibility that the acreage will be increased some because the sales of this year's larger crop will probably justify it. Bill Rawlings, secretary of the association, represented the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation and the peanut growers of the state recently at a meeting in Washington when the problem of allotments was considered. Rawlings said that the first announced cut of about 25 per cent in Virginia's allotment is in the process of being changed. The new plan if sanctioned will reduce the acreage only about 18 per cent in comparison with last year. The final acreage allotment last year was about 146,000 acres for the state. This year the acreage will be around 120,000 acres according to all indications at present, Rawlings continued. Rawlings said that in his opinion...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1952

February, 1952 Pictured left to right at the legislative dinner meeting in Harrison- „ burg are Carmen Davis, secretary of the Augusta Farm Bureau, Congressman Burr P. Harrison, and John East, president of the Augusta Farm Bureau. The legislative meeting was well attended and Congressman Harrison was interested in discussing the Farm Bureau resolutions for 1952. Talking Problems. Norman Bailey, extreme right front, and Harold Purcell, center front, ~ are state legislators who attended a district Farm Bureau meeting in Fredericksburg to discuss resolutions. Pictured with the lawmakers are left front, D. D. Ball; back row, left to right, T. T. Curtis, Mr. Simpson, and John Orrock. State Legislators W 'PWiHil > * rJHHI Membership Conference (Continued from page 1) A. Hubbard will give a Legislative Report on the up-to-date happenings in the state legislature at that time. At 9:45, Petersen will have the topic of The Kickoff Meeting, and at 11 a.m., Long will summarize the di...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1952

a Legislative Dinner Meetings Termed Successful Woolley Returns Frank Woolley, legislative counsel with the AFBF, who spoke at the annual state convention banquet in Richmond in November, returned to the state in January to speak before the Albemarle county Farm Bureau. Here he is shown, right, standing with George Carr, president of the Albemarle group. Woolley was with the USDA for 16 years and speaks from actual experience as to the goods and evils of the USDA. I ** ii i JIH HE 1m R|i M Hk ,~Jfl WL m Bk jM^H Inflation To Continue In '52 Say Top Economist The inflationary pressures that most Americans became aware of as such in 1951, will continue in even stronger proportions during 1952, according to a poll conducted by the Institute of Life Insurance of some of the nation's leading economies. This is the consensus of the great majority of the 28 economists CLASSIFIED Advertising Rates The classified advertising section of the Virginia Farm Bureau News is maintained as a service ...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1952

Virginia Farmers Are Entitled to Parity Vol. 13, No. 3 Scholarships For Rural Ministers - Meet Suggested The 23rd annual session of the Rural Ministers' Summer School will be held at V.P.I. July 7-11, 1952. In addition to the usual fine series of lectures which has characterized this school there wilt be a series of workshops dealing with the problems incidental to the development of a stronger rural church in Virginia. It is expected that successful rural ministers from all over the state will participate in these workshops making them of the utmost value since they will represent the "voice of experience." While the ministers are at the state college of agriculture they will be taken on a tour of inspection to see the various crop, livestock, poultry, dairy, and horticultural enterprises maintained by the college of agriculture and its experiment station. Several other features of outstanding importance this year will be a program of church music and worship, a splendid exhibit of...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1952

2 The Virginia Farm Bureau News Equality for Agriculture 99 mond k'virKini™ 0 " Substring* 1 * Farm Bureau Federation, Inc. at Richtered as p J per year ' deluded in membership dues. EnVirginia under tho t bruary 17, 1941. at the post office at Richmond, Lyric Building, vStoU." 79 " Edito " al and Bußinesa ° ffice8 ' 401 Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Officers President H. Guy Blalock <?; L. SS* Jp - yte " PrMtd4mU Fifth District—J. B. Allman Third District W' R' ck.ii« Sixth District—R. R, Reynolds Fourth District O JwJl Seventh District—W. H. Wright George Palmer Eighth District—T. T. Curtis Ninth District—C. B. Atwell President Emeritus G. F. Holsinger Z I^ U A Director of Insurance Director of Organization M. A. Hubbard Alden E . Flory Cu]lel J Johnßon M Secretary Director of Information ■ A. Hubbard Mrs. Evelyn Carter A. Pick Butler Of 9 By* To Do What Farmers Want Done We commend to your careful reading and thought the letter appearing in this issue of the Larni Bu...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1952

NO. 6 IN A SERIES ON FLUE-CURED TOBACCO NEXT MONTH - SPACING AND TOPPING TOBACCO is susceptible to a variety of root diseases, but probably none has caused more loss to the Flue-cured crop, year after year, than the nematode diseases, Root-Knot and Root-Rot. The damage they inflict runs into millions of dollars each year for the tobacco crop alone, not counting the injury to other crops throughout the South which are attacked by nematodes. This enormous toll has made these parasites one of the South's most serious plant threats and has brought home the realization that something has to be done. Federal and State Agricultural Experiment Stations recognized the need for preventive methods years ago, and have made considerable progress in reducing the nematode menace in the Flue-cured region. Root -Knot and Root-Rot... — . .... Photomicrograph, here enlarged about 50 times, and showing mature female Root-Knot nematode feeding in tobacco root tissues. Note head inserted into giant cells...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1952

4 AFBF's Position On High Taxes and Inflation AFBF will appear before an Appropriations Subcommitee this week to suggest how the President's recommended $85.4 billion budget can be balanced. Specific suggestions for saving in Federal appropriations — including those for agriculture—will be offered. AFBF feels that Federal expenditures must be reduced. In the words of the 1952 Resolutions: Non-essential Federal expenditures must be eliminated ; all expenditures must be reduced to the minimum necessary for the national interest ; economy and efficiency must be achieved throughout the Government. If the Federal government adopts a budget which calls for expenditures of over $85 billion, it will be committing every American man, woman and child to pay about $560 each for government. If there are four people in your family, this means that your family's share would be about $2250. AFBF feels that there is only one way to balance the budget now —through strict economy. A further increase ...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1952

March, 1952 (jJhcdtA and U)hyA of Woman By Catherine P. DeShazo I hope most of you read in your February issue of The Nation's Agriculture our report of the Women's part in the annual convention of the American Farm Bureau Federation. That report entitled "Let Freedom Ring" outlined the work of the Farm Bureau of this nation for the current year. Each month we shall try to give you one phase of that work in this column. This time we are working together on better understanding of prices on the part of the urban consumer. At the Halifax District Meeting one of the county presidents said he felt the need for more facts and figures on the cost of food. He said every where he went he heard complaints that the farmer was charging excessive prices for food. So, at his request we shall give a few facts about these. We hope these will be helpful to you when you meet consumers, either in person or in groups. Today the average consumer spends less of his disposable income for the same food th...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1952

6 Letter Entered In Record of Senate Clarifies AFBF Policy Formulation Senator Warren Magnuson of Washington last week had excerpts from five State Farm Bureau resolutions inserted in the Congressional record. These were offered as contradiction of the stand of AFBF on an important piece of legislation. In order to clear the record as to how AFBF policies are adopted and effectuated, Secretary-Treasurer Roger W. Fleming sent the following letter to the Senator, who had it also inserted in the proceedings of the Upper House: "Dear Senator Magnuson: "I was both surprised and disturbed to read in the January 28 Congressional Record (p. 541-542) the following statement made by you in connection with the debate on repeal of Section 104 of the Defense Production Act: " 'But at the national level the Farm Bureau Federation did send a letter. It was not concurred in, I may say to my distinguished friend from Idaho, by local State Bureau Federations' "On the presumption that you are uninform...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1952

March, 1952 Your Senator Needs You, Voice Your Opinion There is widespread feeling that Congress in many respects has lost the necessary touch with the people. Most Congressmen make prodigious efforts to keep in touch with the home folks. They are always alert for news from the grass roots. Yet life in Washington tends to imbreed. Officials see more of each other than of a cross-section of public opinion. Washington Provincialism Fault for this Washington provincialism lies with the legislative system itself. We are all defective human instuments: Congressmen are no exception. But the degree to which we are out of touch is due to the pressure of our work. For the best way to keep in touch with one's constituents is to mix with them and to exchange opinions directly. Until recently this interaction took place naturally. Congress convened on March 4 and adjourned by the Fourth of July. Then Congressmen went home, lived among their neighbors, and resumed their businesses. In their spar...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1952

8 Artificial Insemination On Increase In State Artificial insemination of dairy cattle in Virginia is increasing rapidly. Keith Huston, associate dairy husbandman at VPI, says that incomplete reports from 32 associations in the state indicate that about 35,000 dairy animals of breeding age were bred artificially in 1951. This number represents an increase over last year's number of about 41 percent. Over 5,700 Virginia dairymen are using artificial insemination as a method for improving their herds. A salesman wired his boss: "I need a raise. If I don't get it, you can count me out." Back came the answering wire. "One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten." CLASSIFIED Advertising Rates The classified advertising section of the Virginia Farm Bureau News is maintained as a service to the readers of The News. Rates are: 6 cents per word for one insertion; 5 cent per word for each insertion where three or more insertions are ordered. Minimum charge is 50 cents. Cash must...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1952

Virginia Farmers Are Entitled to Parity Vol. 13, No. 4 Dinwiddie Leads Honor Roll; Kline Clears the Record Dallas, Tex., March 12 —(UP) —Secretary of Agriculture Charles F. Brannan charged today that Allan B. Kline, head of The American Farm Bureau Federation, had promised to "deliver" the farm vote to Sen. Robert A. Taft (R.-Ohio) in the 1952 presidential election. Brannan, who will address The National Farmers Union Convention today, also accused Sen. John J. Williams (R.-Del.) with being the "No. 1 enemy of the American farmer." He said at a press conference that Kline would have headed The Agriculture Department after the 1948 election if Gov. Thomas E. Dewey of New York had won the presidency, and implied that a similar deal had been made between Kline and Taft. "He's promised to deliver all the farmers for Taft," Brannan said, "But I don't think the farmers can be herded around like that." Sen. Williams, Brannan said, has "been trying to destroy every farm program with consist...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1952

2 The Virginia Farm Bureau News "Equality for Agriculture" Is published monthly by The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, Inc. at Richmond, Virginia. Subscription 60tf per year, included in membership dues. Enterea as second-class matter February 17, 1941. at tha post office at Richmond, Virginia, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Editorial and Business Offices, 401 Lyric Building, Richmond 19, Virginia. Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Officers President H. Guy Blalock .. . „ _ Vice-Presidents c , R M »PP. Jr. Fifth District—J. B. Allman L. Carr Sixth District —R. R. Reynolds iMraDxstnet—W. R. Shelton Seventh District—W. H. Wright fourth District—George Palmer Eighth District—l. T. Curtis Ninth District—C. B. Atwell President Emeritus G. F. Holsinger Executive Secretary Director of Insurance Director o1 Organisation M. A. Hubbard Alden E. Flory Cullen Johnson u T l a^ %lT ' r i Office Secretary Director of Information M. A. Hubbard Mrs. Evelyn Carter A. Pick Butler The Reason Why Secret...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1952

NO. 7 IN A SERIES ON FLUE-CURED TOBACCO TOBACCO is widely acknowledged to require almost constant attention on the part of the grower for a successful yield. A good crop is thus the reward of painstaking labor. In many cases, however, the Flue-cured tobacco grower cultivates the soil in exactly the right manner, supplies the proper amounts of nitrogen, potash, and phosphoric acid — then fails to take advantage of the full benefits of the soil nutrients he has provided. By neglecting to top and sucker the growing plants, or by performing these operations at the wrong time or in the wrong way, the grower allows unprofitable parts of the plant to use up nutrients which would otherwise be aiding the growth of the marketable leaves. Likewise, by failing to space plants in the best manner, the grower forfeits highest quality and yield. For years, Federal and State Agricultural Experiment Stations have been testing and advocating simple and economic methods of topping, spacing and suckerin...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1952

4 Nine of 12 VFBF Resolutions Enacted by Solons In the past session of the Virginia General Assembly bills were introduced concerning all 12 subjects covered by the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation resolutions. Of the 12 bills introduced, nine were passed in agreement with the VFBF resolutions. Three of the bills which were in agreement with the resolutions of the organization were killed. The 12 bills supported by the Farm Bureau as prescribed in the resolutions were: rural health, public welfare, progress through research and education, tobacco disease control, the milk commission, the state lime grinding plant at Staunton, consumer retail sales tax, wholesale produce markets, county appropriations for promoting agriculture, and police protection for the farmer, highway load limits, and rural schools. The three bills which were killed were: one calling for increased highway load limits, one concerning rural schools, and a bill asking for a loan for the development of wholesale prod...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1952

April, 1952 Former Gov. Tuck Praises Principles of Farm Bureau Former Virginia Governor William M. Tuck recently praised the work being carried on by the Farm Bureau, in a letter to William S. Adkisson, Jr., of Halifax county. Before the membership drive began in the county, Tuck wrote, "Of all the farm organizations, the Farm Bureau is most conservative. I have known the leaders both on the state and the national level for nearly 30 years. I am well acquainted with Mr. O'Neal (Edward A. O'Neal) of Alabama, who for many years was national head of the Farm Bureau. I had the pleasure of seeing him in Alabama in November. He believes in and preaches the American system of free enterprise, which has made our country strong and great. Mr. O'Neal and other leaders of this organization believe in the principles and causes which the southern states have espoused and have not gone off with these recent new, false, and spurious doctrines," Tuck continued. "I have been a member of the Farm Bur...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1952

6 CRAZY LIKE A FOX- ♦ Those with a vested interest in Big Government and ever bigger appropriations at the taxpayers' expense have been telling farmers that the Farm Bureau is not their friend— that it is working against their best interests. Let's Look at Some Facts and Then You Be The Judge. The Federal Budget for fiscal 1953 is 85.4 billion dollars. That sum amounts to $538 each for every man, woman and child in the U. S. That is a tax burden or a future mortgage in one year averaging $2152 for each family of four. Farm Bureau leaders are convinced, along with others, that at least 10 billion in "fat" can be trimmed from that budget without damage to the defense effort or any really essential government service. A cut of 10 billion would lighten the tax burden or lessen the future mortgage about $253 on an average for each family of four people. That is a lot more than the average value of some of the so-called "benefits" farmers are now receiving. Farm Bureau leaders have said t...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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