ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Farm Bureau News Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
2,070 results
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1993

July 1993 Deer can be controlled by hunting does, committee concludes By REBECCA COLNAR VFBF County Communications Specialist HOLLAND—Peanut and soybean growers in southeast Virginia agree that the best way to control the increasingly damaging deer population is by hunting antlerless deer. This was the consensus of a deer damage study committee, which met at Virginia Tech's Tidewater Agricultural Experiment Station June 10. The committee is made up of representatives from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Virginia Tech and the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "Deer damage in the eight peanut counties in southeastern Virginia calculates out to just over $2 million," said Russell Schools, executive secretary of the Virginia Peanut Growers Association and one of the farmers addressing the committee. "In 1992, we lost 3,000 tons of peanuts to deer in those eight counties...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1993

4_ July 8: Putting Food First project, Suffolk, sponsored by Virginia Farm Bureau Women's Committee. Contact Brad Lowery, 804-225-7525. July 8-11: Region 15 Arabian Horse Show, Virginia Horse Center, Lexington. Contact Larry Lawrence, 703-231-9162. July 9: Putting Food First project, Henrico County, sponsored by Virginia Farm Bureau Women's Committee. Contact Brad Lowery, 804-225-7525. July 9: Sustainable Agriculture Extension Research Workshop, Blacksburg. Contact Jerry Jones, 703-231-6704. July 11-16: Youth Conservation Camp at Virginia Tech. Contact Wayne Compton, 4-H Extension youth specialist, 703-231-6371. July 13:1993 Virginia Blackberry/ Blueberry Day, 9 a.m-3:30 p.m., Southern Piedmont Agricultural Experiment Station, Blackstone. Contact Dr. Herb Stales, 804-292-5331. July 15: Virginia Forage and Grassland Council annual meeting and tour, Virginia Tech. Contact Harlan White, 703-231-9802. July 15-16: Virginia Pesticide Control Board. Contact Dr. Marvin Lawson, 804-371-6558....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1993

July 1993 Farm Bureau claims adjusters still reeling from worst storm in history By KATHY DJXON Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—National weathermen may have called March snowstorm the Storm of the Century, but a June 4 wind and hail storm in southside and southwest Virginia was the worst storm in Virginia Farm Bureau's history. "We've never had this many claims at one time," said C.E. "Chuck" Clement, executive vice president ofVirginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company. "And I hope we never do again." As a result of the unpredicted storm, VFBMIC has had thousands of claims from policyholders in 15 counties, with the worst damage in Charlotte, Mecklenburg, Halifax, Carroll, Bedford, Appomattox and Campbell. By mid-June, 90 percent of the claims had been paid and the other 10 percent Take fat out of traditional cookouts with substitutions Grilled tuna steaks, skinless chicken basted with barbecue sauce, or shrimp and vegetable kabobs are all great meals for cookouts, but sometime...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1993

6 School's interest in agriculture culminates with Ag Fest '93 v |&guug| BiJ Zjii ■• r^^ m* ■H IByr ap * J|j ICfj*K4a™i^E'^E/t'' J&t jaWMiMMisii^^MHW^^M''^ v 4 fa : ; - ' In the above photo, Overby-Sheppard Elementary School students pet a cow. Below, others intently examine a section of bee hive, complete with bees. Several of the children hold candles that they made with beeswax. (Photos by Kathy Dixon) ■l Newly hired Ag in Hie Classroom coordinator plans to expand program By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—MicheIe ing over to the other side. After several years of teaching, she's giving it up to coordinate the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Agriculture in the Classroom program and fund-rais-ing foundation. As the new AITC coordinator, Ms. Awad will be responsible for working with teachers already using the program, persuading other teachers to begin teaching Ag in the Classroom, offering workshops on how to use the materials, conducting fun...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1993

July 1993 A tale of two foreigners... Similarities between Portugal and U.S. include landscape, fanning techniques By REBECCA COLNAR VFBF County Communications Specialist CHARLES CITY—The Northern Neck ofVirginia might be a long way from Portugal, cork trees and bull fighting, but there are many similarities in the landscape and farming techniques, according to Jose Ribeiro da Cunha. Cunha visited Virginia to study farming irrigation systems, with Montague Farms in Essex County as his base. Cunha is a surprisingly young, slightly built man who has worked on his family's 3,704-acre farm since he was a youngster — so farming is nothing new to him. The 25-year-old surveyed the acres upon acres of wheat surrounding him at the Virginia Small Grains Association Field Day held first at Renwood Farms and then at Westover Plantation. "The landscape in Portugal looks like this, except this area has so much water," he said, looking admiringly at the James River and at all of the standing water...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1993

8 Health Insurance of the steep increases in insurance premiums. • Many are not able to find adequate medical coverage. Virginia Farm Bureau may have the answer for you! Some of our members report savings of over $1000 a year in Insurance Premiums. Does Your Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Your Current Policy Provide? Virginia Coverage Policy Coverage rx/ | | including coverage in and out of the hospital W 1 J rzzzz: An Annual Out of Pocket Limit am The maximum amount you will personally pay for j «r covered services in any one year is limited. L _J iMA I i Dental Coverage Included \S I I Prescription Drug Card f- jt\ I Vision Care Discount J njr\ PloviKilitu %r Flexibility I J ... To use the doctor or hospital of your choice.* , -JL y r M jr Low Rates ! %r I I i A wide range of options to meet your budget needs. : IX I SSaSSS/55mrilk» ice ° ffices 1 1 1 We will provide you personal service and remove the I hassle from your claim Ming. j W_ | * If your provider does not participate wi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1993

July 1993 Senators address members' concerns (Continued from Page 1) Farm Bureau wrote to Hillary Rodham Clinton in February outlining what should be included in the plan. The list included a 100-percent health insurance tax deduction for the selfemployed (currently 25 percent), and elimination or drastic reductions in cost shifting from Medicaid and Medicare to individuals and third-party payers. Farm Bureau also recommended to Ms. Clinton regulatory flexibility for health providers in rural areas, assistance for medical communications systems and greater efforts by medical schools to train family physicians for rural practices. Another major concern of Farm Bureau was the Btu energy tax proposed by Clinton. The tax has since been dropped. The farm organization told the senators that balancing the federal budget is a better alternative than raising taxes. "Farmers have to cut back; Virginia has had to cut back. But that hasn't seemed to go beyond the beltway," expressed board membe...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1993

10 THE FARMERS MARKET A Free Service to Members Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $5.40 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge. member must pay TOTAL number of words Single letters or figures and groups of figures in ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) ♦ Payment MUST accompany order. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. NO PHONE CALLS. > Deadline: Ads must be received by the 15th of each month prior to the month of publication. For the combined Sept/ Oct. issue, the deadline is Aug. 15. For the Dec./ Jan. issue, the deadline is Nov. 15. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they win appear. (Please fill in this new classified ad f...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1993

July 1993 Group accepts award nominations WASHINGTON—American Farmland Trust, a national farmland conservation group based here, is accepting nominations for its 10th Annual Agricultural Conservation Awards. The awards honor individuals and organizations making an outstanding contribution to the protection of the nation's agricultural resources. Awards recognize superior efforts by individuals, private groups or governmental bodies that do at least one of the following: • Establish or improve upon public policy that promotes farmland protection • Protect the long-term viability of a specific farmland area, either by saving it from development or soil erosion, or by reducing the negative impacts of agricultural land use on the environment. • Communicate the need to conserve the country's agricultural resources. • Display a strong commitment to Founder of VFBMIC dies of heart attack RICHMOND— Alden E. "AT Flory, one of the founders of the Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Co., die...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1993

■ E <j&jHflHK||JM^U^^^HU^^E2R HI. ~ I iiiiii i * ,fii^Hn9nHHHi^^Hi ■ i r L w ft # ■ |i||||l|/ ■ I ■ ■ I I iff I I Wwtk 111 X^T lit 6~7^^ x Vol 52, No. 6 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA'S AGRICULTURAL PTOOCICERS And on his farm he had some ducks... An inner-city student at Overby-Sheppard Elementary School in Richmond checks out some of the farm animals that visited his school June 2 for Ag Fest '93, a day of hands-on agriculture education. See related story and photos on Page 6. <Pho*>by Kany c*xon) Membership record 1 Stormy Weather 5 New ATTC coordinator 6 Different perspective 7 Read how the Virginia VFB experienced the storm of VFB has its first full-time Two foreigners visit Virginia Farm Bureau surpassed its the century m June. Find out Agin the Classroom coordi- and talk about the differences own membership record. what happened in southside nator. Read what she plans and similarities in agriculture and south vest Virginia to do with the edu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1993

Vol 52, No. 7 Good, bad both describe Clinton's health reform plans By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor WILLIAMSBURG!—Good and bad could both be used to describe President Clinton's undocumented proposals for health care reform. And Farm Bureau health insurance managers from across the country spent June 28 and 29 here discussing both perspectives with a representative of the American Medical Association's Department of Health System Reform and the American Farm Bureau Federation's chief economist. "One of the best things about this program is that we had the opportunity to find out how other Farm Bureaus are handling their health insurance needs," said Mike Voiles, CFCU, manager of commercial lines and brokerage operations for the Missouri Farm Bureau. No solutions were found, but the conference participants learned that parts of Clinton's proposals may be effective. "There are lots of things we're going to like about the Clinton plan," said Susan Browning, director of the Ameri...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1993

2 Farmers upset by ERA emission stanoarusior farm eauioment lliv 111 m Government regulators running amok is not exactly earth-shaking news these days. Overremulation aeemstobethe rule miher than the |1 - A -; WFOCUS American Farm Hurmu fedetuhotr , J says it intends to develop a new set of exhaust emission standards fof s ., farm equipment and other off-road . machines. Hie announcement has upset farmers, construction people and Hie manufacturers of farm and industrial equipments The EPA claims to have evidence that the diesel engines , used in farrajtor actors, marine engines, construction equipment and logging trudfiß combined, contribute 9 percent of the nation's nitrous oxide pollution. It is hard to say if such a pie in agriculture, it doesn't make much sense. American Farm Bureau Federation President Dean Kleckner says EPA must be running out of things to regulate if they are trying to measure pollution ton tractors operating in farm fields. Kleckner notes that rural America ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1993

August 1993 Study finds that health benefits of fruits, vegetables outweigh potential risks By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor RICHMOND—A three-year study of whether the nation's pesticide laws adequately protect children says there is potential for increased risk, but stresses that more research is needed. The National Academy of Science's report released June 27 said there is a "potential concern" that some children may be exposed to unsafe levels of pesticides through residues on food. It said "serious deficiencies" in the government's pesticide regulatory mechanisms need to be corrected, primarily in data collection. But NAS study chairman Dr. Philip Landrigan also said the health benefits of eating fresh fruits and vegetables far outweigh any potential pesticide risks. "We are very specifically not encouraging parents to rush out and throw away certain kinds of foods," Landrigan said. "We don't want that to happen. That would be an absolutely inappropriate reaction to the repor...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1993

4 Mark your calendar Aug. 1-4: Walnut Council annual convention, Staunton. Contact Dr. James E. Johnson, Virginia Tech, 703-231-7679. Aug. 4:l2th annual Virginia Food Festival, State Fairgrounds on Strawberry Hill, Richmond. 4-8 p.m. Advance ticket sales only. Contact the Virginia Agribusiness Council at 804-643-3555. Aug. s:Bth Annual Cooperative Expo '93, Culpeper Farmers' Cooperative, Culpeper. Contact Douglass Smoot, 703-825-2200. Aug. 5-8: Southern Regional 4-H Horse Championship, Raleigh, N.C. Contact Dr. Bob Mowrey, 919-515-5784. Aug. 6-7: Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Young Farmer Committee meeting, Richmond. Contact Norman Wilkinson, 804-225-7544. Aug. 6-8: Virginia State Horse Show, Quarter Horse Division. Contact Sue Mullins at 804-228-3200. Aug. 11: Virginia Forage and Grasslands Council Valley-Blue Ridge Forage Tour, 5 p.m., Rob Harrison Farm, Fluvanna County. Contact Harlan White, 703-231-9802. Aug. 12: Virginia Corn and Soybean Ag Expo, Harris Brothers Farm, Spotsyl...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1993

August 1993 Hardy, disease-resistant landscape roses require iittie care; act as barrier For several years I have been making observations on some rose bushes I was given to try out. I am not usually a rose grower, but when the plants were offered to me, I was developing a new garden and found space for them. The location was a difficult one: full sun with disturbed, post-pine harvest and cloddy clay loam along the garden fence. I hoped that the thorny mounds would act as a deterrent to the groundhogs and rabbits which necessitated the fence in the first place. In my garden, plants growing outside the fence get little more than monthly observations and a quick spring pruning. Yet after three years of near neglect, I am pleased to report that the roses are doing fine. In fact, they are better than fine. They are doing what they are supposed to do—cover the ground, compete against the weeds, and flower repeatedly throughout the season. The roses which are performing so well for me are...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1993

6 DUKE JUST CAME UP WITH 500 MORE REASONS FOR BBJQNGMS TO YIMB H^M^IREAU. FARM BUREAU NEWS August 1993

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1993

August 1993 JII j CSMfJft tl) hjjS|CJ(^§Tjk» Heaitn roionn '; x : ■' * ........9*4 would ofifer a standard benefits package to all Americans eligible health care claims would involve some hh»t. are currently required. It would mean that information would be stored in |i computer and reports <m who% gettingwhat kind of health care and how much they're paying will be distributed to consumers. -*tpi way, they can monitor what's going on in the health care arena and can make a more vOQ wrowriiiig commented. Health alliances would involve ftrnj'iifywSj ay>H The collection of agencies would act as a non-profit organization and intercede between *f>uyefl#and providers, sudi as Blue Cross and Blue Shield of V irginia. % f There is a real possibility that t he current health iiisuranee structure could be replaced by these health ftllfonnpa," wirl Jfows Korwpa, deputy chief economist and chief policy analyst for the American Farm Bureau Federation. But the pro...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1993

8 Tech's two-year ag program meets student and industry needs By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor RAPlDAN—Virginia Tech's two-year Agricultural Technology program has opened doors for Walter Kayser that may have been shut before. Kayser, who graduated from the program in May, is working on 1,500-acre Linden Farm, which is owned by the president of World Airlines, T. Coleman Andrews. Linden Farm was just one of several job offers the 35-year-old Kayser received after graduating with a 3.8 grade point average. The two-year ag tech program, which offers technical training in such areas as animal and plant care, soils and agriculture business, began in 1987. It was created at the prompting of state industry leaders who needed people trained in specific, technical areas of agriculture. Students enrolled in the program choose an area of concentration from four options: animal agriculture, plant agriculture, agriculture business or landscape and turf management. "There is a need for thi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1993

August 1993 Turning corn into whiskey is profitable for Culpeper farmer By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor CULPEPER —When Chuck Miller stumbled onto a 60-year-old copper pot still in an abandoned barn, the possibilities began churning in his mind the way the still now turns oorn into whiskey. And the possibilities have since become realities. For three years now, Miller has been running a successful business, distilling and bottling "Virginia Lightning" corn whiskey on his 190-acre farm. Last year he sold 2,000 cases of Virginia Lightning to Alcoholic Beverage Control stores in Virginia, West Virginia and Maryland. This fall he hopes to expand his sales into North Carolina. "If s starting to make some money for us," remarked Miller, who says he ei\joys running the old-fashioned still, along with some help from his daughter and four sons. A farmer by trade, Miller had been looking for a way to supplement his farm income without working somewhere other than thel7-year-old Belmont ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1993

10 When the heat's on, make cool meals with healthful salads Summertime in Virginia brings plenty of heat and humidity, so the last thing you need is to generate more heat in the kitchen. If just the thought of turning on the oven makes you wilt, try some no-oook summer meals the entire family will ei\joy. Picking up some pre-made salads from your favorite deli is definitely the easiest way out of cooking. But most are rather heavy in the mayonnaise department, which means lots of fat and calories. To improve the nutritional value of oam- 4 leaves romaine lettuce \ " 4 leaves radicchio 4 oz. lean roast beef, sHced thin skim mozzarella cheese, 2 red bell peppers 8 mushroom caps snipped 1 top. freahbaafl and thyme, snipped 1/2 tsp. dried oregano olive oil Arrange romaine and radiochio on two {dates. RcOl the roast beef and cheese and place them around the plate on the lettuce. Decorate with zucchini slices, red pepper slices and mushroom caps. Top with herbs, and drizzle with dive oil...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
x
Loading...
x
x