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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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A New Ellipsograph. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

A New Ellipsograph. The compass for drawing ellipses, illustrated in the accompanying cut, from La Propagation fndtutrielle, is a German invention. Its operation is based upon the truth, that by cutting a cylinder in an oblique plane, the edges of the cut surface will form an ellipse. The two arms, properly so called, of the compass remain fixed with their points on a line, (dotted here) the instrument being held in a vertical piano. A sleeve, h, to which is jointed a third arm, k, is capable both of sliding upon the adjacent arm of the compass and of turning around upon the same, This supplemental arm, k, carries the pencil or traoing point, />. In turning the sleeve, the point. f>, describes a oircle equal to that of the circumference of a cylinder having for its axis the longer arm of the compass. While iliis is being done, care is taken to allow the sleeve to slide upon the arm to which it is attached to an extent sufficient to enable the point to be kept c...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Silk Culture in the Mountain Counties. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

Silk Culture in the Mountain Counties. A corespondent of the Sacramento Union, writing from Nevada city, takes the following very correct view of the culture of silk in the foot-hills and especially in that county: — One of the hopeful indications of prosperity in the future is to be found in the attention now being paid to sericulture throughout the State generally and in this county especially. This subjed has of late excited a deal of discussion among the shapers of public opinion. It is oik- of peculiar interest to the residents of the mining section, us it is generally conceded that the valleys cannot compete with the mountains in this respect—all the circumstances being favorable to the production of a superior quality of silk at the least expense in the latter "locality. In the presence of existing facts, it is difficult to see where the opponents of the silk culture find there material on which to found their opposition. There can lie no doubt of its success in this state. T...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AGRICULTURAL NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

AGRICULTURAL NOTES. CALIFORNIA. A California Farmer.—The Chico Enterprise has a lengthy notice of the various operations in progress on (Jen. Bidwell's farm. This farm contains about 18,000 acres of land, divided into three departments —agricultural, pomologioa] and grazing. He has about 2,600 acres in grain; 8,000 fruit trees; 50,000 vines; 200 head of horses; 1,000 head of horned stock; 8,000 sheep, and 2,000 head of hogs. All his stock is of superior breeds. Tins celebrated Chico flouring mills, owned by him and located on his farm, are capable of turning out 100 barrels of flour every 24 hours. Hi' is now building a mansion which, when finished, will be one of the most magnificent places of residence in the State. Various works of improvement are constantly going on upon all parts of the farm. Among other things, lie has been setting out shade trees the past winter, along the lines of his principal fences. The General will soon have established for himself a princely home; where...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOME AND FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

HOME AND FARM.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
FARM HOUSE CHAT.-No. 3. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

FARM HOUSE CHAT.-No. 3. There seemed nothing surer in the way of airy architecture, than that I would build this week a model farm house. Especially for tho kitchen I had everything in apple-pie order; but a brief interview with Nell Van's "Delia's Aunt Mary," has shivered all its timbers at such a rate. 1 can only "stand by" and wonder if we really have been making involuntary soft-soap all our days, and wasting our substance on perilous chemical combinations that in the interest of science, should have made an end of us long ago. Here have I been patiently domesticating and putting through their paces everybody's pet hygienic hobbies; getting them well in hand, not only for my own culinary convenience, but that I might upon occasion trot them out again for public approbation, Improved by careful training, warranted safe and pleasant to ride or to swallow and leave no sign. When the Rubu Pnr.ss. like a special providence, began to "shine on all both great and small," inviting corre...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SHORT PAPERS ON AGRICULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

SHORT PAPERS ON AGRICULTURE. [For the PIMM, bj l>r. -T. B. Thomas.] True Theory of Utility in Pulverization. Our lust paper closed with an abstract, or rather a condensed account of " Jethro Toll's philosophy of thorough pulverization in agriculture." The reader will remember that the sum total of his theory is that plants eat the soil, and that their mouths are too diminutive to receive the partioles, unless they bo reduced to a very tine powder. The true theory on this subject has been already partially developed in a previous paper. It has been stated that a finely divided soil, other things being equal, contains a larger supply of fertilizing elements. This is true, because, in this minutely divided state, the soil draws more freely upon its two sources of fertility, viz., the subsoil below, and the atmosphere above. The clay or subsoil which underlies a fertile field is, usually, rich in mineral salts. These constitute the larger portion of plant food, and of course ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOME INDUSTRY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

HOME INDUSTRY.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Our Sugar Supply. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

Our Sugar Supply. EDITOBB Pbess: —The consumers of sugars in California and tho country to the east of the Sierras, deriving their supply through the port of Ban Francisco alone, pay for this ono agricultural product over $0,750,000 annually. It is therefore of immense importance to know how much of this enormous consumption can bo supplied from the industry of our own people. When the late Geo. Gordon was largely interested in tho refining of crude sugars obtained from Central and Smith America and the Pacific Islands, it became with him a question of great interest as to whether the enormous sums of gold annually paid for foreign raw sugars, could not to some considerable extent bo kept at home. Ho was a man of comprehensive views, and of great and good judgment, and as his thoughts naturally turned to the consideration of the great sources of sugar supply, he could not but observe that the manufacture of sugar from beets was rapidly gaining in importance in many of the countries ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
GOOD HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

GOOD HEALTH.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
How to Prevent Spring Sickness. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

How to Prevent Spring Sickness. Dr. Wood, in the Herald of Health for April, gives the reason why so many people are subject to a " bilious attack" every spring, and points out how the trouble may be avoided. This periodical complaint is usually termed " spring sickness." We condense from the Doctor's remarks as follows: There is no more need of people being sick in the spring than at any other time of the year. This periodical sickness may easily be avoided by a little attention to diet. During the winter people eat larger quantities of carbonaceous food, such as fat meat, butter, bread, etc.—the system naturally craving such diet more than during the summer, to keep up the animal heat against the greater cold of winter. As a general thing, more is eaten than is necessary, and as a consequence, the system is clogged up, and the excretory organs, particularly the liver, is overburdened in vain efforts to get rid of it. Those who lead sedentary lives, and get but little outdoor exerc...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
What Sickness Costs. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

What Sickness Costs. The Medical and Surgical Reporter estimates the cost, to the 2'eople of the United States, of medical services and medicines, at $100,000,000, and adds $25,000,000 for the quack medicines swallowed. "Let the people," it says, "study these figures awhile, and then reflect that probably onehalf, or certainly a large fraction, of this expense is incurred by a deliberate infraction of the laws of health; that, if they tippled less, smoked less, overworked less, were less 'fast' and less self-indulgent, they would save some thirty or forty millions a year." If the cost of the loss of time, loss of happiness, loss of ability to do and dare was added to the above, there would be no counting the expense of sickness. And then add to this the expense of those indulgences that make us sick ! The truth is, sickness is the most expensive nuisance on the face of the globe. There may be instances where it makes people better, but generally it makes people selfish, sad, misanth...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Eating too Fast. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

Eating too Fast. Eating too fast, generally involves eating too much—more than is needed for the support and nutrition of the body, and the reason for this is, that the organs of taste which are our guide in this matter, are not allowed sufficient voice; they are not allowed time to take cognizance of the presence of food ere it is pushed past them into the recesses of the stomach. They do not therefore have opportunity to represent the real needs of the system, and hence allow the crowding of the stomach. I hold that thirty minutes should be spent at each meal, and spent too, in chewing the food a good portion of the time; not in continued putting in and swallowing, but in pleasant chat and laugh instead of a continuance of the intense nervous pressure of the office or library. If you lay out to spend thirty minutes in this way at your meals you may rest assured you will not eat to much, and that what you do eat will be in the best condition for appropriation to the need of the sys...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
OUR WEEKLY CROP. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

OUR WEEKLY CROP. The Earthquake, at the commencement of our weekly trip through the ranch, causes us to pause for a moment for sentiment and reflection, to devote a short space of time to the consideration of Busy Idleness. From this, however, we are soon awakened by the sight of a new Steam Flow for Tule Lands, and hasten on to the Library of Mechanic d and Scii-ntitic Progress i By moans of the knowledge hen acquired, we im 1 enabled t<> take a trip to Amatlor County, to visit the Now Oeyat Field of Montana, and to discover an Unknown World. Here w* find SB Important Letter for Minors and Fanners with regard to land mattetS and a oollection of valuable Inventions. AYe visit Again our practical Manure heap, which W« pass around in an ellipse which is accurately BUlked out for us by I New Ellipsograph, auil ]» nnaiiriitiv described by the aid of a New PICM. Th.n we go to the .Mulberry grove to ascertain what can be done in the way of Silk Culture in the Mountai...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HERBAGE AND FORAGE PLANTS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

HERBAGE AND FORAGE PLANTS. In continuing our remarks under the above head we would hero call attention to the fact that some varieties of the grasses ore more economically adapted to be consumed as pasturage, while others are better suited for dry feed. Some develop their economic properties more fully when grown alone; others when in combination Some develop early spring herbage; others late. Some are most nutritious in spring; others at the flowering period, and again, others still nt the autumnal season. Some delight in moist soils to the extent of becoming aquatic or semi-aquatic plants; while others will only perfect themselves on dry or almost arid lands; and possibly, what will perhaps be calculated to astonish the reader, there are a few that have been found to flourish better on poor, as compared with rich soils; and lastly, a few varieties only prow to perfection beneath the shade of trees. Simple, therefore, as the study of grass appears, it will be found on close examina...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CHOICE POULTRY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

CHOICE POULTRY. Mr. George B. Bailey, of Oakland, reoeived by overland railroad, onFriday last, i;> light Brama fowls (from the Autoorat strain) and a trio of Buff Cochins. These fowls are of mammoth size, and came through in most excellent condition. The Brama roosters, would dress about 12 pounds and the liens 10. The 15 Bramas sold, in one lot for $800. The Cochins, which are really beautiful to look upon, arc not for sale; it being the intention of Mr. 15. to keep them in his poultry yard, for breeding purposes. The freight bill on the whole lot was 1140. They are all last summer's chickens, being but about eight months old. The price at which the Bramas were sold— l2o, is just twice the figure at which Mr. 15. sells the pure stock bred at his yard, in Oakland. At the samo place where the above were on exhibition on Friday, corner of Sansome and Merchant streets, Mr. ('. INT. Nichols, the pioneer poultry raiser, had a display, in contrast, of a trio of African bantams...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Bay District Horticultural Society. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

Bay District Horticultural Society. This society hold a special meeting last Saturday. It will hereafter hold meetings, open to the public, on the leeond Saturday of each month, at No. C>'22 Clay street. Arrangement! have been completed by which the Society will be enabled to give a horticultural exhibition in August next. The Society has negotiated with the Me* chiuiies' Institute, to build a wing to the main building of the Pavilion, forty-live feet wide and 300 feet long, on Geary street, which is to be under control of the Horticultural Society, and is to bo connected by three long passage-ways with the main building. This exhibition will comprise plants, flowers, fruits, vegetables, seeds, etc. The premium list is already completed, and prizes to the 1 amount of six hundred dollars will bo offered. It is proposed to introduce some new features in this exhibition, and to make it surpass anything of the kind ever given here. The offloe of the Secretary is at No. 41H Ke...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE CROP PROSPECT. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

THE CROP PROSPECT. The rain which has fallen the past week came most opportune, mid just in time to save a large proportion of our grain crops from a most disastrous failure. It has been worth millions of dollars to the, State, and has been received with feelings of gratitude and thankfulness. About two inches was received in this city and vicinity, a much larger amount to the north, but less at the south, dp to the present time of writing, Thursday noon, we hear of no fall, whatever, to tin 1 south of Tulare or Monterey. The total fall in this city, to date, is now about 18.85 inches. This ruin came too late to save the grain on some of the drier portions <»f the San Joaquin valley; but it lias been of incalculable \alnc to the State generally. The effects of the threatened dronth, as will be seen by our to-dayfl report, had already begao t<» be felt in the grain market. The question of orop is now pretty well settled the only anxiety being with regard to surp...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. Deferred Communications rooeived tlio past week A. short paper on " Tli<- Ferret and its Usefulness;" •' How to Destroy Gophers," and an interesting letter from Montana. Planting Mi uii.uitY Bxed.—A subscriber from San Jose, desires to know bow to oolleot, oare for, and plant the seed of tlif mulberry tree. He thinks some of our nurserymen or large silk-growers mi^lit be able and willing to give information on this point. We are not aware that the Beod has ever boon planted on this coast, for the reason that the tree is more easily propagated from outtings. Perhaps, however, soino of our tree culturists might feel disposed to give the information required, through the Pijkss. Catciunu Molks. -Acorrespondent from Oakland is desirous of learning how he can best eatoh or destroy the moles, which aro very annoying and destructive, on his grounds. If any person has any valuable experience in this matter, we should be pleased to communicate if through...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SILK CULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

SILK CULTURE. At the appropriate season we discussed in the BtTBAL PBEBS the different modes of planting mulberry trees and the cultivation of the same; also the preparation, planting and cultivation of cuttings. The season for planting is now past and we will here remark that during the past planting season there has been more mulberry plantations set out in the State than in any previous year. Those who have commenced in the culture this season have done so iifter due deliberation and have exercised caution and prudence in the matter. Very few have set out over two thousand and many not over five hundred trees. They propose to feed a few worms this season to learn practically tho art of feeding and caring for them, and to test the adaptability of their particular localities to the business, so that by another season they will Ih> prepared to enter upon tho new industry with the advantage of one season's experience. We promised that as the season advanced and the time ar...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Improved Hay Rake. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 8 April 1871

Improved Hay Rake. Among the late improvements which California has made in agricultural in^lements, improvements which have an actual importance for all on our coast in that they aid in the production of the country, an improved hay rake, recently patented by Mr. O. Bonney, Jr., of this city, deserves attention. This rake is designed for gathering hay or gleaning on any ground, and from its construction, it is claimed, will save double the amount of hay on rough land that can be saved by either the old revolving or the wire tooth rake, besides delivering the article in a superior condition. It is, moreover, very easily handled by both man and horse. The illustration gives a good idea of the device, several of the important points of which may hero be touched on. The teeth are adjustable, being held in a malleable shank by set nuts, and can be run out as they become worn, two feet being the length generally used. This is an advantage over stationary teeth which, when worn one season...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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