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Elephind.com contains 5,897 items from Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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A Five Years' Sentinel. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

A Five Years' Sentinel. Sentinels have accomplished won ders of faithfulness and endurance; but the service of a sentinel on the island of Rugen, as reported by him self, is a unique example of pa tience. A detachment of the French Gen oral Davoust's army was stationed on the little island of Rugen. An order to leave it immediately was received and the soldiers embarked and sailed away with the greatest haste. One man was forgotten. He was oiy sen tinel duty. Back and forth he march ed for hours after it was time for someone to relieve him. Finally, he lost patience and returned to head quarters, and found the post deserted. His companions had departed in obedience to imperative orders. "I am lost, ruined, disgraced," he lamented; "I shall be sent lor and shot as a deserter!" His distress touched the heart of a good fellow who witnessed it, anc he took him home with him, cheered liim up, and adopted him into his family. As time passed, and no sum mons came from France, the soldier t...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A BUSINESS SECRET. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

i A BUSINESS SECRET. "I have learned a secret by long ex perience that may be of value to oth ers," says a New York business man, the head of a large drug firm. "1 have the oldest man in the house assume the position of censor. We are naturally a progressive house, and are always going after new business in fresh fields. Our young men are full of ideas and new ways. Some of them are good, others bad. The young man can never have tne same slant on such ideas that the man of ripened experience has. So every time a young man gets a new idea he takes it to the old man, whom we call 'the filter.' If the idea isn't good, or lias weak spots, it is killed at once. If it is good, the older man adds to it or O.K.'s it as it is, and it is put into force. "The system has worked wonderful ly well. In this way wo reach the very greatest efficiency.", Tramp: Please, kind gentleman, could you help a poor blind man? Gentleman: But how am I to know you are blind? Tramp: Because I called you a gentlem...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BIRDS IN WAR. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

BIRDS IN WAR. A sailor recently stated that sea gulls are very useful for betraying the whereabouts of a sumnarlne. When the birds discern a periscope they rise in a flock from the water's surface, and circle round it uttering shrill cries. This performance at tracts the attention of the crews of approaching vessels, and ofttimes re sults in the submarine being dis covered. Whilst seagulls are unconsciously aiding sailors, parrots are carrying out equally useful work for soldiers. It has been discovered that parrots have an extraordinary faculty for an ticipating the approach of aircraft. Be fore an aeroplane has come within range of the human eye, the feather ed alarum becomes violently agitat ed and shrieks incessantly. In France wild birds often provide artillery observers with clues as to the whereabouts of hidden batteries. Birds rise in flocks from trees in the vicinity of which guns are being fired, and when there is a lull in the ac tivities of the concealed artillery many o...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MODERN ITALY. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

MODERN ITALY. The entry of Italy into the great war revived special a't ntion to that fascinating country and its people. Apart from the knowledge of heredi tary feuds with Austria, there was much in the Italian character to at tract students of ethnology. In a volume entitled "The World Deci sion" Robert Herrick writes: - "What makes for the happiness of a nation?" I asked myself in the mel low silence of ancient Rome. "Is it true that economic conquest makes for strength, happiness, survival for the nation or for the individual?" Italy has nearly always been poor, at least within modern memory-a literal actual povertv when often there lias not been enough to eat in ti.e family pot to go around. She has had a difficult time in the econ omic race for bread-and-butter for her children. There is neither suffi cient land easily cultivable nor man ufacturing resources to make, her rich, to support her growing popula tion according to the modern stan dards of comfort. Yet the Italian pea...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FROG SKIN FOR WOUNDS. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

FROG SKIN FOR WOUNDS. A successful method of skin graft ing in which frog skin Is used instead of human skin as a covering for slow-healing wounds is described by Captain H. W. If. Kendall, R.A.M.C. Wounds in which the skin has been destroyed heal naturally with a con tracting scar which is often unsight ly and inconvenient, but this method leaves a neat and supple scar. Frog skin can be obtained in abun dance at the Front. The loose skin of the inner side of the frog's leg is snipped off with scissors, spread out, and applied by its under surface to the wound, which has been cleansed without antiseptics. It is fixed in place by a covering of gutta-percha tissue and a dry dressing. In three days the site of the graft appears as a spot branching outwards towards the edges of the wound. After the fifth day the wound is dressed until healing is completed, all contraction bein^: avoided. Captain Kendall claims for this method that it has the advantage of transplanting a skin free from h...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW ALSACE WAS LOST TO FRANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

HOW ALSACE WAS LOST TO FRANCE. It is just over forty-six years ago that the city of Strasburg, the key of Alsace, capitulated to the Germans in the Franco-Prussian War. It wap 011 August 9, 1870, that siege opera tions were commenced against this city of vital importance, and it must be admitted that the Germans had 110 very difficult task before them, for the fortifications were extremely old, the citadel having been constructed nearly two hundred years before. Nevertheless, the garrison, number ing 17,000 men, under General Ull rich, held out with remarkable hero ism, despite the continual bombard ment and a scarcity of provisions, for the long period of seven weeks be fore surrendering. After the general bombardment of -the city, during which the. assailants did not .trouble'.to avoid shelling the beautifui cathedral, a determined at tack was launched on Lunette 53, which was carried. The ditch protecting Lunette 52, however, was a more formidable pro position, being sixty yards ...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
When Women Must Propose. The Need for Women to Offer Marriage to the Men They Love. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

When Women Must Prppose. % The Need for Women to Offer Marriage to the Men They Love. The question, "Should girls pro pose?" is not a new one. But the war has certainly given it a new yes, and a tragic significance. No longer is it a flippant query; it is a question of serious import, one that a woman must be asking herself today, and. that many more will be asking themselves wiien the boys come home Women must propose-in certain circumstances, if they are to achieve happiness for themselves nnd for the men who love them. Many a brave fellow now fighting at (lie front or in the fleet, will, when ho returns, be a cripple, maimed for life, aged beyond his years, blinded, nerve shattered. Such a man, though n proved hero in the face of death, will be a coward in the presence of the woman he loves. His honorable scars, the disfigurements that will speak of his bravery in the fight, will yet, in his mind, be barriers to the realisation of his love. Many such men will ask themselves sadly...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AUSTRALIA PLAYS THE GAME No. XI. SLAVES IN GERMANY: [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

AUSTRALIA PLAYS THE GAME No. XI. SLAVES IN GERMANY: Since the destruction o£ those Asi .atic Empires who lived by consign ing the whole populations o£ conquer ed countries into captivity, the world has not witnessed such a horror as the deportation of able-bodied Belgian r ales to Germany, now going on. It is almost the last misfortune that can befall Belgium, although the pa thetic appeal to neutral countries that has been issued by the Belgian work men indicates the suspicion that when the men have been used up the women will be enslaved next. It would seem that part of the German plan of war was the utilisation of the Belgians as slaves. When their armies first broke into Belgium, some of the population was deported into Germany right off. This action created considerable alarm, and, to allay it, Baron von Heune, Military Governor of Antwerp, gave Cardinal Mercler this document in writing, which was read in the churches on October 18, 1914:-"Young men need have no fear of being c...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Misplaced Business Talent. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

Misplaced* Business Talent. "I believe I ought to tell you what I think," said Dobley to his artist friend. "You are wasting your time painting pictures." "Oh, I don't know!" said the artist proudly. "I sell them, don't I?" "That's just it!" remarked Dobley. "IE you can sell them you can sell anything, so why don't you take up some other line with more money in in.

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
EDISONS WAGER. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

EDISONS WAGER. It was a wager that set Thomas Alva Edison on the road to fame and fortune. When he was a telegraph operator much annoyance was caused by cockroaches getting into the tin cans in which the boys carried their lunches. Various methods of getting rid of them were- tried, but without success, and then Edison made a bet that he would exterminate the foe. The next day the dinner-cans were piled in a heap, and the wizard sur rounded them with a circle of tin foil ribbon about an inch wide. About quarter of an inch, away he placed a .similar circle, both ribbons being up right, and then connected them with a battery. Along came the cock roaches. To surmount the obstacles they had to place their hind legs on the outer ribbon and their forelegs on the inner one. The moment they did so the circuit was completed, and they toppled over dead. Edison's suc cess made him talked about, and was his real start as an inventor.

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Sporting. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

Sportinj THE Porepunkah spor15 on Frid,,,4 were very successful throughout pi were fairly numerous, particulari,?^5 horse events, and competition! quence was keen Intending competitors at the f0rt] inn Easter Carnival are remind all nominations close withthoi.^ (Mr E. J. Delanyj on Sa^tf 31st inst. . " From what can be gathered ,1 list of entries can be locked for'sJ oming Easter Carnival Downed horse-owners'jare reported to be 0" iiing their forces for the day, J same can be said of the wood'chc Locally, great interest is being on the Shire Plate, and foi this*l. Messrs A. W. Quin, A. Miles, Hi Tal»ot, and others are petting tfcjj]! spective horses in condition, race is one that is always populajX the sportingj-public, and it is predict that the field for this eves/ be large and interesting '' At the EJi races on Friday last Larkin, of Bright, rode three ii:. His mounts being Lady Solano Trial Stakes, Daylight Saving ijftSp Open Handicap, and Lady SoIanofc'vS Local Hack Race. Tess,...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"Our Sailors' Day." [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

" Our Sailors' Day." WHAT our sailors have dona for tlio Em pire is beyond all praise. What the citiz»cs of Victoiia are going to do in re turn will sooo bo demonstrated. Those who go down in nhip3 have kept open the high ways of commerce and made possible the free existence of the Commonwealth itself. The Lord Mayor of Melbourne, as president and treasurer of the Button Fund, assisted by thut indefatigablo hon. organiser, Mrs Arthur S Woolcott, ia now making an appeal for fundB to help Our Sailors. Silently, unostentatiously, with marvel lous strength and abiliiy, our Navy does its work. Ships come and go-the Navy acta as guard. Our wheat, our minerals, our woul pass on to tha markets of the world under the N'avy'a care, and we have been enrichod in that we hav3"c'ishod in " our products with a minimum of 1ob-<. The Lord Mayor will not require to beg for a hearty respoDBO to hia appeal. Il will bo a privilege to recognise Our Sailors by subscribing to this fund, which in...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XXII. Evidence Destroyed. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

CHAPTER XXII. Evidence Destroyed. "Civility for one thing-none- of your treating me as i£ I was a worm! Understand that, straight off. If I liked to claim my rights, Belle Buck ford, alias Lady Derek Carboyne, I coul'l drag you away from here td my home, and treat you as my wife should be treated." He was scowling, malicious, utterly abominable. But she was a desper ate woman, fighting for the happiness of the man she loved, and fighting, too, for something perhaps greater still-the fair name of her unborn child! ' She had had a moment in which to think of the consequences, and the inevitable conclusion was taking root in her brain.- If this accuser of her shadowed past were to be bought, surely no price was too great to pay that her secret might remain invio late. "A murderer cannot demand civil ity," she cried in a hard voice, and she saw him quail. If only she had possessed the courage then to sum mon assistance and dare him to do his worst! But the momentary ebul lition of pluck...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Feather in the Wind Published by Arrangement with Cassell & Co., Lon. and Melb. All Rights Reserved. CHAPTER XXI. Blackmail. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

A Feather in the Wind By FRANK H. SHAW, Author of "The Love Tides," Bondage of Hate," &c. Published by Arrangement with Cassell & Co., Lon. and Mplb. All Rights Reserved. CHAPTER XXI. Blackmail; No doubt about it, this intruder into the sanctuary of her love and hope was Buckford, the murderer, the escaped felon; and - the thought grasped her heart with an icy, de stroying hand-her husband. "Shut that door!" he ordered coarsely, moving towards her. She obeyed him, the door thudded to. "Lock it!" Her trembling fingers turned the key. Slie did not faint, she simply remained nlive, like a froz en woman standing 011 the edge of a towering precipice, down which she might expect to hurtle at any moment. Then her pride came to her rescue; she was a daughter of a gallant race. "Who are you?" she demanded, with some assumption of bravery. "What do you want here?" "You know who I am, my lady, my fine lady. Lady Derek Carboyne isn't possessed of such a short mem ory as all that...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Daylight Saving. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

Daylight Saving. UNDER the Daylight Saving Act clocks are to be restored to the normal time "at two in the. morning of the last Sunday in March." The last Sunday in March is the 25th. On that day, there fore, all clocks will be put back one hour. A Forbes publican has two clocks in his bar, one showing the hands an hour ahead of the other. The first is labelled "Dinkum time'' and the [other "bunkum time." He closes by the "bunkum time.1'

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

Oo You Dread lour uicais? Your food does you little good wheD you have no desire for it, when you dread meal time. What you need is Chamberlain's Tablets for the stomach and liver. They will sharpen your appetite, strengthen your digestion, and giye you a relieb for your meals^ For eale^by Walker Bros. Bright; J. H. Jonee, . Harrietville ; . 0 Lardi, Wandiligong ; ' C G Goodman, Porepunkah; J. Eitohie, " Buckland Don't Neglect Dyspepsia. A DANGEROUS POLICY LEADING TO UNTOLD MISERY LATER ON. UNTOLD misery invariably results from neglect of the early symptoms of indiges tion and dyspepsia, and there is always the possibility that stomach ulceration or gastritis may develop. That is why it is so dangerous for those who experience pain after eating, with a flushed face, heartburn, etc., to wait and if the symp tions will subside of their own accord or become wotse. Be assured that they will certainly become worse unless you take steps to neutralise the acid, which is the root cause of t...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Strike Talk [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

Strike Talk " STRIKE TALK " as regards the Victorian railways is very much in the air at present, and moreover, it is said that if the drivers firemen, cleaners, and others connected with the lines of this State "come out," those in other divisions of the Commonwealth may follow suit. However, there does not appear to be quite the unanimous feeling among the railway employees, that, in consequence of certain existing conditions they should endeavour to '! stop the wheels from going round,'1 some people seem to imagine-nor is it by any means a fore gone conclusion that a ballot on the question "to strike or not to strike?" will result in an answer in the affirmative. At the same time the fact that we have such a pitifully weak and politically in vertebrate State Ministy in office consti tutes a great encouragement to those who think that the bringing about of disturbed and dislocated industrial and commercial industries is amply justified, and that the best way to effect it is by a. ...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Humorist In France. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

Thepiumorist In Francs. THE intensely cold and wet weather con ditions on the Western front in France, which add to the sufferings of the men in the trenches, are frequently mentioned in letters from Australian soldiers ; still the bouyancy of the spirits of the soldiers en ables them to see the humorous side of the disagreeable conditions. Recently a private was engaged washing mud from his face in a large pool close to the front line when his comrade protested. "Here," he said, " ain't you making it hot washing in the water we've got to sleep in ?"

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Patriotic Concert at Porepunkah. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

Patriotic Concert at Pore punkah. THE Public Hall at Porepunkali on Friday evening last waB well filled with local and district residents when the annual concert in connection with the St. Patrick's Day sports was held. The programmo arranged included eoverol faces new to local audiences, and these combined with the old favorites mad© s bill of fore that certainly deserved the applause that was bestowed upon it. Mr Thos. Seamer, J P. acted as chairman, and in that capacity proved very success ful. After the National Anthem had been sung, Mr Reg. Moore, of Myrtleford, who for some yeara has been on the Fuller vaudeville circuit in Melbourne, sot the ball rolling Reg. possesses a beautiful tenor voice, and his first number, "In the garden of my Heart," gave him scope to display his powers. At the conclusion a voceriferous demand was made for a repetition, when Mr Moore scored another success with "In the Sunshine of your Heart.'' Later Mr Moore showed his versatility by singing in Ita...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
War Precautions Act. CASE AT MYRTLEFORDFINE OF £25. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 23 March 1917

War Precautions Act. CASE AT MUVTLEFORD FINE OF j£25. AT Myrl'eford Court of Petty SeBaionB on 9h inst, Albert Qlenda Moore waB chirped, on the information of Oonatable M'Keoeh, wilh having at Myrtloford, on 23rd December, 1916, contrary to the provision!! of the War Precautions Act, uttered-statements likely to prejudice re cruiting. Mr F. H. Mackay, of Beech-' worth, appeared for ihe Defence Depart ment ; Mr M. P- Ryan, of Beethworlh, Tor defendant. Mr Mnckay produced authority to prose cute. He then outlined the case, and j :iakod that if the charges wore proved a j moderately severe penalty be inflicted, to | show tlie defendant he should not make suoh statements, and also to deter others from doing the sime. Walter Mummery, farmer, deposed that on 23rd December he waB outside Myrtle ford railway Btation. WitneBa said it waB A pity conscription had not gone through, when defendant said, " We don't waut any more men ; -there are millions at Salisbury Camp ; I know it for a faot."...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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