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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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A NEW MATCH-MAKING MACHINE. A MILLION MATCHES AN HOUR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

A NEW MATCH-MAKING MACHINE. A MILLION MATCHES AN HOUR. Several American technical Journals describe a new match-making machine, with a capacity of nearly a million matches an hour. Only five boys arc required to operate the machine proper, while the older machines called for the services of 25 men. The split wood is sawn crosswist- of the grain into 2in. lengths, and the splints are cut from these blocke in a specially-designed planing tool consisting of two rows of 32 knives each. As the knife makes 250 strokes per minute, the capacity of each machine is nearly a million splints per hour. The .splints are firet dried by hot air, and then gathered up and placed in the hopper of a cleaning machine. From the cleaning machine the splints are taken to a straightening machine, where they are shaken down until they arrange themselves side by 6ide in long, parallel rows. They are pieked up and put ?n little boxes 4in. deep. 2in. wide, and 15in. in length. These hold era are carried to the ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PRESSURE OF LIGHT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

PRESSURE OF LIGHT. Professor Lebedew, of Moscow University, has succeeded in demonstrating by experiment that light exert* a pressure which is independent of its color and directly proportional to the incident energy. The late Professor Clerk Maxwell was the first to estimate the amount of this pressure from theoretical considerations, and to point out that the concentrated rays of the electric lamp falling on a very thin metallic disc suspended in a vacuum might possibly produce an observable effect. The radiometer invented by Sir William Crookes was once thought to have justified the last suggestion, but it was soon seen that the movement of the delicately-poisei vanes in that instrument was due to the unequal heating of their bright and dark faces. Professor Lebedew eliminated the thermal action by enclosing his "light mill," which was made of very thin alu minium foil suspended by an almost invisible glass fibre, in a large bulb all but completely exhausted of air, and by exclud...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Discovery and Invention. CONJURING BY ENGINEERING. A MACHINE THAT TURNS RODS INTO CHAINS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

s Discovery and Invention, \ \ CONJURING BY ENGINEERING. | A MACHINE THAT TURNS BODS | INTO CHAINS. < { You p«t a rod of steel in at one end of a ) machine, and a weldless chain comes out of the / other. Such is a brief description of the mar- / vellous work done by the Strathern Patent Weld- I less Chain-making Machine. It is a sort of con- ( juring by engineering- S The machine is of a massive description, and \ has been designed to turn out weldless steel ^ chains up to one inch diameter. It is bnilt closse ^ to the furnace which heats the bars. ) The action of the machine in stamping the ) shape of the links of a chain on a bar of cruci? ) form cross-section is as follows:— ) The plain steel bar of modified cruciform \ cross-section is placed in the furnace, which is \ IjOft. long, and, under the flames of the Dowson \ gas supplied, it is soon brought to a red heat. ( Jt is then pushed forward sufficiently to allow the ( tlies of the pressing machine to engage it. ( T...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A NEW MARINE TURBINE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

——— . \ A NEW MARINE TURBINE. i ♦ A great amount of thought Is being given to the development of the turbine system of motor, and •with a system so much in its infancy the results up to the present have been excellent. Tet the steam turbine is capable of improvements which •will overcome some of the difficulties inherent in the present type. An American invention seems likely to create somewhat of a sensation when placed before the public. This invention is distinguished broadly from the best-known forms by the fact that it has no stationary parts other than the Journals and foundation frames which carry it, "the casing ot the turbine revolving as well as the abaft, but in an opposite direction." 9 In general construction it consists of an an terior shaft which extends from the forward journal to the rear propeller, and upon this shaft is formed a series of spiral blades, which have a steady increase in diameter from the for ward or admission end of the turbine to the rear or exhaus...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW KING EDWARD WORKS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

} z=z HOW KING EDWARD WORKS. > HJs Majesty the King Is one of the hardest worked Englishmen of the day (says the Lon don "Express"). It has been found necessary to organise a department for the transaction of the King's business. The consumption of stationery Is enormous, and one of the minor charges introduced at the commencement of the present reign was the system of supplying the King's stationery from the Stationery Office in exactly the same way as the other Departments of State are furnished with writing materials at the public expense. The King's hard work rarely ceases, but his Majesty is understood to thoroughly enjoy the brief sojourns at Frogmore, where full state ceremony is dropped, and where some measure of repose and leisure is attainable. There is an excellent housekeeper at Frog more, whose arrangements for the comfort and well-being of his Majesty and the few guests who are invited for the shooting commend them selves to the King. A military band is brought over...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Comic "Who's Who." SATIRICAL BIOGRAPHIES OF PROMINENT PEOPLE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

A Comic "Who's Who."i SATIRICAL BIOGRAPHIES OF PROMINENT PEOPLE. Under the title of "Lives of the 'Lustrious, a Dictionary of Irrational Biography" (says the London "Evening News"), Messrs. Sidney Ste phens and Leslie Lee have issued a sort of comic "Who's W^o?" which is very entertaining to every one whose name does not appear in the volume. Here are some of the "Lives":— LORD SALISBURY. Salisbury, Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne Ceeil, inventor of the Salisbury cold-water cure for political hyperaesthesia, chemist and humor ist, was born at Algiers in 1S30. After enduring great privations in the Australian goldfields, Dr. Salisbury joined the staff of the "Latter-day Pooh-Pooh," and was raised to the peerage for bis services ae special correspondent at the Ber lin Congress. Iu the House of Lords Lord Salis bury is never so happy as when fluttering the episcopal dovecots, or discouraging the ebulli tions of enthusiastic philanthropy. Thus, when an ardent champion of temperance had sp...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A MODERN SPORTSMAN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

A MODERN SPORTSMAN. "I think, perhaps, a bike ride will do me more tfood this morning,' —"Sketch."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TWENTIETH CENTURY WOMEN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

> TWENTIETH CENTURY WOMEN. ) > The girl of the Twentieth Century, even if she > smokes a cigarette and talks slang, seem to me > an infinitely more capable being than her grand > mother was. Have I not good reason to believe > this, when I know what hard work can be done | by women at my agricultural hostel at Reading? > And by women, too, who have not been brought ) up to it. Fancy ladies in crinolines hoeing po(,a ) toes and potting tomatoes! Surely a great deal ) of nonsense is talked when the woman of the S nresent dav is coin Dared unfavorably with the S type 6f 50 years ago .—Countess of Warwick in 'Country Life.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RAILWAY TRAVELLING IN JAPAN. STRANGE ORIENTAL CUSTOMS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

! RAILWAY TRAVELLING IN JAPAN. ) > , . —»■. ! STRANGE ORIENTAL CUSTOMS. The second and third class railway carriages in Japan give the foreigner an opportunity to study the life of the people. On entering the apartments, the first thing one notices is that white lines are drawn across the glass win dows, «nd upon inquiry the information is elicited that some of the people who travel in the cars are unused to glass, which perhaps they have never seen before, and that they are apt to put their heads through the panes if there is nothing to indicate that a substance bars the way! In cold weather all Japanese travellers c^rry nigs, for the cars are heated merely by long steel cylinders filled with hot water and laid on the iloor. Since the passengers are always pulling open the windows, Japanese cars in midwinter are a menace to the health of every individual who has become used to an even temperature within doors. The smallest incident of travel is enough to break the ice, and if a ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HE MAKES IT PAY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

HE MAKES IT PAY. _ Benson: "Talk about the lamentable state of 1 the public service? Why, there's Nestor, for In- 1 etarce. He has been in public office for 25 years, < and what, I should like to know, has he ever 1 accomplished?" i Weston: "Well, he has had a job all that time. 1 Surely, that's eomething."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE KING'S ESCAPE FROM SMALLPOX. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

| THE KING'S ESCAPE FROM ; SMALLPOX. Quite the thrill proper to a Christmas num ber belongs to the extra issue of "M.A.P." which tells how narrowly the King escaped smallpox immediately after he had recovered from typhoid fever 30 years ago. Colonel Valentine Baker—then of the 10th Hussars—had suggested to a struggling artist named Piggott that he should paint a picture of the regiment. He accepted the suggestion. But it was impossible to obtain a sitting from the Prince of Wales, the honorary colonel, since he was but just convalescent. So the uniform, with the ribbon of the Garter, was lent to the artist, on condition that It should be returned on demand. When it was called for in order that the Prince might wear it on Thanksgiving Day, the artist, who had been arranging it upon his lay figure, was found lying on the floor of his studio in the last throes of malignant smallpox. Had this occurred a day later, the infected clothes would have been worn by the Prince. As it was, they ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DOBZYNSKI'S CHANDELIER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

DOBZYNSKI S CHANDELIER. > I'm a laddie bright, a Cumberland wight. And a luckless, bold athlete; As a kicker high, you bet I'm fly. And a terror with my feet. 'Xeath a Briton'6 frown I do the town On a merry Sabbath night; And I show my skill as I work my will On a blaring, flaring night. With a jumping raise I strike the blaze Of a heavy chandelier; With a heavy boot on a sizable foot And a stomach tanked with beer. 'Twas a sorry shame, I was not to blame. Though I danced till the glass was crumbs; But I foot my bill with a sorry will For the benefit of the bums. That is why a screech through a burr of speech: "I'm a luckless, bold athlete; As a kicker high, you bet I'm fly, Anil a terrnp with mv f»f." —San Francisco "Bulletin.*

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FORGERY OF PICTURES. TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY SPURIOUS "COOPERS" DISCOVERED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

j FORGERY OF PICTURES. s . _ S TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY SPURI OUS "COOPERS" DISCOVERED. | The extraordinary announcement has been , made in England that more than 200 pictures , liave been forged and placed on the market as i genuine works of the veteran landscape and animal painter, Mr. T. Sidney Cooper, R.A. Mr. Cooper hiinsolf sent a certificate and letter to the Carlisle County Court recently condemning one of these forgeries. He said that of 286 pictures submitted to him for verifica tion 255 bore his forged signature. The particular spurious picture which was before the Carlisle Court was a landscape with cattle, and was signed "T. S. Cooper, 1S30." The picture had been purchased by Mr. R. W. Tweedy, of Portland-square, Carlisle, a member of the town council, from a family who had had it for 40 years. At Mr. Tweedy's sale it was bought for £23, by Mr. James Clements, general deaJer, Castle-street. Mr. Clements now brought an action to re cover that amount, with interest and expen...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CARE FOR NUMBER ONE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

- I CARB FOR MVMBER ONE. , "It is true." said the person of high ideals, ''that you have attained prosperity by your writings. But you have produced nothing, that will live." "Well." answered the comfortable litterateur, '"when it comes to a question which shall live, xnvself or mv writinm. I don't hesitate to aaorl lice my writings. '"Washington Star."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PROVERBS IMPROVED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

PROVERBS IMPROVED. ! (BY "JIMMY.") < "Speech is of silver, and silence is gold"—but the voice of the "copper" has value untold. "The Devil is the father of lies—hut necessity Is the mother of them." "Charity covers a multitude of" parsons—in broadcloth. "Honesty is the best policy"—it's one of the few things not "made in Germany." "The child is father to the man," but man in tieed prefers to have relations with his "uncle."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Roasted to Death: THE APPALLING DISASTER IN A PITTSBURG FOUNDRY. TEN MEN PERISH. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

r I Roasted to Death: > ' — | THE APPALLING DISASTER IN A PITTSBURG FOUNDRY. ) ' «*■ ) TEN KEN PERISH. > A gas explosion occurred at Pittsburg. U.S.A., > at 20 minutes past 6 on the morning of December ) 19. at the Soho furnaces of Messrs. Jones and ! Laughlins. in which ten men were roasted to 1 death, and five injured, three of whom are not 1 expected to live. 1 The men employed at the furnace were at | work on the top" platform, which is 120ft. from > the ground. They were just preparing to leave, having been working on night doty, when the gas which had accumulated in the furnace ex 1 oloded. At this moment the men were stand ' inc on a small platform near the top furnace, 1 and when .the gas reached this all the men made > a rush lot the elevator, but It had already de > scended. i There was therefore no way of escape but to i Jump, which meant death, while to remain on , the platform meant a doom no less certain. Tons of molten metal, cinders, and slag rained...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TRYING SITUATION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

; TRYING SITUATION. Miss Amateur: "Can't you give me a part with more speaking in it?" Theatrical Manager: "For what reason?" Miss Amateur: "Well, before going on the stage. I belonged to a woman's debating club, I and not havinc a rhonno tn nnv mif/>h *nM I very ill with me.' '—"Columbus State Jour- ( nal.'

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FOB DIVERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

FOB DIVERS. In Germany there has Just been patented a highly ingenious helmet, or mask, for'divera. It consists of a face covering held closely in position by springs, and connected by tubas and valves with a • haversack. In the haversack ere two reservoirs of oxygen, the flow of which can be carefully controlled by a valve, and a vessel containing an alkaline substance, the function of which is to purify the diver's Inhalations and send back oxygen to the reservoirs.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEW ARTIFICIAL LIGHT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

NEW ARTIFICIAL LIGHT. Professor Gorbam, of Brown University, U.S.A., who has long been attempting to discover an ar tificial light which shall be free from heat, has succeeded in extracting from a decayed porter house steak enough illumination to take photo graphs. The "Electrical World" «f New fork chronicles this achievement under the heading "Light without Sweetnesa."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PREDICTION OF FOGS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 25 January 1902

PREDICTION OF FOGS. It has not yet been found possible, according to the British Meteorological Office, to predict fogs within a couple of hours of their appear ance, or to warn electric-lighting stations ot their approach when they are of the wandering kind. Even a thunderstorm's course is more readily ascertainable. In the United States, where there is a large area of land surface, some generalisations have been made with re spect to the path of a thunderstorm which are very interesting. It generally develops in the south-east quadrant of a low pres sure area, 400 or 500 miles from Its centre; and it moves away towards the east or south east at a less speed than the low barometer area itself, the atmospheric region favorable for - the storm's development spreading out like a fan. Thunderstorms occurring in the south west quadrant of a low barometer area are generally sporadic in character; small storms only are affected by the topography of the country.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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