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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

mmmmmmmm M m V " Wy-y ' r-s)fi rwf rprw 49 The Indian Advocate. li1 HWHNywfl1'1''1''"1 Mater is burned down her son's heart is bleeding and will not be satisfied till it be rebuilt again, and that other friend of ours who writes "as long as I have money in the bank command me I shall and will obey." They say charity has grown cold in the hearts of men in some parts of the world perhaps but certainly not in our neighborhood. The Advocate in its own name and in the name of the community thanks the good people around Sacred Heart for their substantial help for the deep interest they took and still take in our welfare and above all for the practical charity they exhibited towards us in the hour of need and trial. Let us hope and pray that some day, not far distant, our common sorrow may be turned to joy! As for our dear school children they too left heart rending was the parting. Dear children pray that dear old Sacred Heart may soon "phenix-like, revive from its ashes" that it may cont...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

Tht: Indian Advocate. 50 LOCALS. Rev. Fr. Louis Choron, O. S. B., left for France on January 21. 4th. -A day school will be opened at the Mission, February Deo Gratias. The pupils of St. Mary's academy were transferred to Shawnee till other provisions can be made. The sunshiny virtues of cheerfulness, courage and hope, need to be cultivated just. now at Sacred Heart Mission. Are we keeping our new leaf turned over in this new century? Prayer and the sacraments will help you, friends. Rev. Fr. Constantine, of El Reno, came to view the ruins of his old abode, on his return home he was accompa nied by Rev. Fr. Clement. We received very interesting items from Tecumseh and Shawnee we regret exceedingly not to be able to put them in print they were like the rest reduced to ashes. Mr. Auguste Zoeller moved into his new residence, which by the way, is a very comfortable one. Mr. Zoeller is a prosperous merchant. His brother, Frank, is one of our clerics. Rt. Rev. Fr. Abbot Felix DeGrasse an...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

- . 51 , s The Indian Advocate. K; , ST. MARY'S ACiVDEMY. VVWrfNirwWNrf Communicated: No sooner was the alarm given than Joe McFarland, the hired man, sleeping on the premises, was aroused by the red glimmering of fire at the windows of his room. He at once rushed out, ran to the academy and had all the inmates aroused and ready for any emergency. When the Mission people arrived on the scene of fire, some of them climbed up to the top of the building and did their utmost to save it by pouring water on the roof, while Joe went around for help. A number of neighbors had gathered in the yard, where burning shingles were falling as thick as snowflakes. From the top of the roof could be seen the southern portion of the monastery already in ruins, when hopes were yet enter tained of saving St. Mary's academy. But the intense heat from the college, on the northern end of the monastery, igni ted the steeple of the Church, and inside of forty minutes the whole Church structure disappeared, w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

t-lFm JFW ' V'i'lWT''J' WI"."yi'W ;y mvf llw'SFwwyyinwTSB'S' . Tun Indian Advocate. 52 PERSECUTION IN FRANCE. WIWWWW ACCORDING to the news from France, the Catholic Church is about to undergo a trying persecution in that country. Those who are unacquainted with the political affairs of France will be surprised to hear this. "Is not France a Catholic country?" they will ask. Very true; but its gov ernment is anything but Catholic. On the contrary, a group of infidels and other enemies of the Church are in control of state affairs in France. They are the ones who are getting ready to persecute the Church anew. They have singled out the religious orders at present. It is their intention to put in operation measures that will practically exterminate these bodies of devoted men and women who, in France as every where else, have labored untiringly and with remarkable self sacrifice for the benefit of all the people. And now that a culmination seems to have been nearly attained by the effo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

' iff- -, ' !iM-ffl)ftapPPlUr'rlijy-" nwyfSrw"" .ymwtyiniiij" 'TWt"u ' 'w,ff. tw ,' y'y " y p-yy -,. m.. 53 The Indian Advocate. and converting a new set of barbarians, who will be the most prominent members of her flock during a coming decade of centuries. But the remembrance of what France has done, as an instrument of God, for Catholics and civilization will endure in the world when the annals of many a new proud na tion shall have become myths; for that remembrance will be guarded as a precious souvenir by that Church which will en dure until the end of time. Perhaps it will be chiefly by a study of these Gesta Dei per Francos both the original se- ries, which were so named a thousand and more years ago, and the latter ones equally glorious mat tne student or tne thirtieth century of the christian era will be able to learn something definite concerning that Arianism which is even now almost a myth to most people, although it was, in its day, more powerful than Protestanism has e...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

fllWyy, 'fW; "Wt'S"VWl '"f '"T''JP'IMyl"yHHl Wy wy i'MyTrwi"i ' "m - ffi'Vm m "'"' ' 'W Thk Indian Advocate. 54 read how, when the Roman people, in 754, had proclaimed the secular sovereignty of their Pope-king, Stephen II, and the Lombard still quasi-barbarian monarchs, Astolphus and Desiderius, had appropriated much of what was rightly styled the Patrimony of the Church, the Franco-Gallic in fact, the French sovereigns, Pepin and Charlemagne, restored by force of French valor, the temporal power of the Pope, de claring that they reserved to themselves and their successors "No power within the same limity, unless that we may gain prayers for the repose of our souls, and that by you and your people we be styled Patricians of the Romans." And when the searcher for his historical truth shall have read such annals of the nineteenth century as may have come down to him, he will wonder why so many Italians of that time were so basely ungrateful to that pontifical monarchy which France ha...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

""" " T '"' h '"'li wwiiro4 w?w W'JM'Jni r 55 The Indian Advocate. lantty the French prevented their own land from succumbing to the dire conflagration which had seared the regions watered by the Thames and the Elbe. "Luther came into the world, ,says Lacordaire," and at his call Germany and England sepa rated themselves from the Church. Had France accepted their fearful invitation, what would have been the result for Christianity? Her national enthusiasm saved France. Con fedeiated in a holy league, Frenchmen placed their faith above everything else even above their allegiance to their monarch and they refused to recognize as legitimate heir to the crown any prince who would not swear fidelity to the God of Clovis, of Charlemagne and of St. Louis. For the defence of the Church, we Frenchmen have fought combats of blood and mind. Arianism crushed, Islamism vanquished, the temporal dominion of the Popes consolidated Protestant ism repelled, behold the four crowns "of France which wil...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

The Indian Advocate. 56 preservation of His Church and though the indications are that the infidels and Freemasons are to have their way and that war is to be declared against the Church the result will no doubt be even as it was when a minister "im Fatherland," far more powerful than any minister is today in France, en tered upon the like war in that country. God's promise is still in force "The gates of hell shall not prevail" and the fu ture historian will add more "Gcsta per Dei Frajicos" to be transmitted to posterity. U. I. O. G. D. t h THE STORY OF1 OKLAHOMA. IT is an absorbing tale which is told by Governor Barnes in his annual report upon the condition of Oklahoma. As we know from the census returns, Oklahoma has a population of 398,000. The governor tells us that the assessed valuation of her property in 1900 is, in round figures, $49,000,000, an increase of $6,000,000 over 1899, and within her limits there are still almost 6,000,000 acres of public lands subject to en try...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

jppwyp'yi'f; vuppamyy W'Vmmwgm- ffwwyff'OT' i - , - - 7 57 The Indian Advocate. established settlements in it, but they were ousted by the Uni ted States troops, and it was made practically vacant land as before. A minute before noon of April 22, 1899, the instant of the opening, there was not a single inhabitant in Oklaho ma. It contained 56,000 inhabitants by sundown on that day. Such a deluge had never been seen before since the world began. One of the most remarkable features of Oklahoma's growth is its symmetry and solidity. At 2 o'clock on the af ternoon of that opening day a bank with $50,000 capital was established in a tent in Guthrie, a town which began to peep out of the prairies a few minutes earlier. On hundreds of thousands of acres wheat began to be sown that afternoon. Scores of towns were staked out before sunset. Schools and churches began to make their appearance the next day. Just a month after the opening day a convention met at Guthrie with the intention of for...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

I fmfn' imfmvwi mmvf f " T 43 5t Tun Indian Advocate. THE GOODNESS OF1 PROVIDENCE. NWVWNVNWNWNS. HE Lord my pasture shall prepare, And feed me with a shepherd's care; His presence shall my wants supply, And guard me with a watchful eye; My noon-day walks he shall attend, And my midnight hours defend. When, in the sultry glebe I faint, Or, on the thirsty mountains pant; To fertile vales and dewy meads, My weary, wand'ring steps he leads, Where peaceful rivers, soft and slow, Amid the verdant landscape flow. Though in the path of death I tread, With gloomy horrors overspread, My steadfast heart shall fear no ill; For thou, O Lord, art with me still; Thy friendly crook shall give me aid, And guide me through the dreadful shade. Though in a bare and rugged way, Through devious lonely wilds I stray; Thy bounty shall my pains beguile; The barren wilderness shall smile, With sudden greens and herbage crowned, And streams shall murmur all around. 58

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1901

p w l'iyjWI'fHlff'"''?' ff?f fflj?iyjgw ' "Shf "' ft I k 2. :; I : 4- i 5- S' ij 6. ; i! 8- r ij 9 ij lo- I; ' Ij 11. !; 12. ;; ) 13. !; 14. ' !: 15. it i i6- U !: I7' r i j: x9- " ij 20. r : 2I- ;: 22. I . i! 2- ii a ! ! 27- if ii 28. 1901. CALENDAR 1901, X X X FEBRUARY, XXX VWWWWNt'W S. Ignatius Bp. M. D. ' . Candlemas, D. 2 cl. Septuagesima Sunday, Semid. St. Andrew Corsini Bp. C. D. Our Lord's Prayer in the Garden, ' D. maj. St. Lawrence Bp. C. O. N. D. St. Romuald Abbot, O. S. B. D. St. John de Matha, C. D. St. Hilary Bp. C. Dr. D. Sexagesima Sunday, Semid. St. Scholastica V., O. S. B. D. 2 cl. with Oct. Com. of the Passion, D. N. J. C. D. maj. Bl. Eustochium, V. O. S. B. D. St. Gregory II Pp., C. O. S. B. D. St. Titus Bp. CD. St.IldephonseBp. C. O. S. B. D. Quinquagesima Sunday, Semid. St. Helladius Bp. C. O. S. B. D. St. Benedict Aniane Abbot, O. S. B. D.-.Ash-Wednesday, Semid. St. Raymond Pennaford, C. Semid. The Holy Crown of Thorns, D. maj. Vigil St. Peter Damian Bp. C. Dr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

Vol. XIII. r vfe , rrr jt- -rr F7 --- TME UK March, igoi. PROGRESS OF LIBERTY. Why muse Upon the past, with sorrow? Though the year Has gone, to blend with the mysterious tide Of old Eternity, and borne along, Upon its heaving breast, a thousand wrecks Of glory, and of beauty, yet why mourn, That such is destiny? Another year Succedeth to the past, in their bright round, The seasons come and go, the same blue arch, That hath hung o'er us, will hang o'er us yet, The same pure stars, that we have loved to watch, Will blossom still, at twilight's gentle hour, Like lillies, on the tomb of Day, and still, Man will remain, to dream as he hath dreamed, And mark the earth with passion. Love will spring From the tomb of old affections, Hope And Joy, and great Ambition will rise up, As they have risen, and their deeds will be Brighter, than those engraven on the scroll Of parted centuries. Even now, the sea Of coming years, beneath whose mighty waves, Life's great events are heaving into birt...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

62 The Indian Advocate. OUTLINE OF SPANISH-ZUNI HISTORY. BY FRANK HAMILTON CUSHING. Now again, after this demonstration, the Zunis, as in the ' - days of the great flood, when men had disobeyed the gods, as when Coronado advanced on Hawik'uh, so soon as they had completed the rites of purifying and baptizing the scalps, be took' themselves to Thunder mountain and thereon entrenched themselves. . It was not until after two years had passed that they were attacked there, but not overcome, by Tomas de Albizu and his soldiery and induced by the priests who accompanied him, ' . -- and whom the Indians, knowing them be be unarmed, allowed to approach, to hold parley. It is probable that Don Tomas, finding it impossible to storm their rock successfully, promis ed that if they would yield the wretched mestizo who had cut off the hand and torn away the scalp of Fray Martin, he and his people would leave them in peace. At any rate, the muti lator of the friar was yielded, and in due course wa...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

MMMiiiiiiiL.jiixjiiiij..LiiiiiiiiiiiMii i ".;rrnrrrzrr75!zj ml . The Indian Advocate. 63 of Hawik'uh, and, making for the lower courts where stood the church and conve u, they dragged Fray Avila from the al tar, where he had sought refuge, clinging to the cross and an image of the Virgin, and, stripping him, beat him to death with one of the church bells at the foot of the cross in the courtyard hard by. They then plundered and burned the church, threw the image of the Virgin into the flames, and, transfixing the body of the priest with more than 200 arrows, cast upon it stones and the carcasses of two dead lambs. The mutilated corpse was thus found the following day by Fray Galdo and carried to Halona for sepulture in the Church of the Purifi cation there. After this tragic occurence the pueblo of Hawik'uh was abandoned by the missionaries and for a short time at least by its native inhabitants as well. Nevertheless, it seems highly probable that other Zunis, if not indeed some of ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

nTwtsSS 64 The Indian Advocate. When all the knots had been numbered and united, then, to a man, the Zunis arose to slay Spaniards wherever they might encounter them, They forthwith killed Fray Juan de Bal, the priest of Halona, burning his church and destroying the chapels of the lesser towns round about. Not content with this, they dispatched warriors to the Tusayan country to see to it that the Hopi remain faithful to their promise and vigorously to abet them in its fulfilment. It fared far otherwise with ihe priest of Hawik'uh. Al though his name is unknown, and although it has been doubted that any other missionary than Fray Juan of Halona was with the Zunis at the time, or that the mission of Hawik'uh was ever occupied after the death of Fray Pedro de Avila, yet Vetancurt's chronicles are explicit in stating the contrary, and that although the Church of the Conception was again burned, the priest escaped. This latter statement is substantially true if we may trust Zuni traditi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

'lg-Tjpi m-vy j-t - T-T-r i--ir"7-j5(y"wjpr j'f-T' mf'mu X Thk Indian Advocate. 65 martyrdom as bridegrooms of the Virgin herself as from love of the Zunis, if one may judge by the regard they even still have for his memory, and a hope that, living, he might per chance restrain them, alike to the good of their people and his own people, the father gave way to their wishes; or he may have been forced to accede to them by one of those compulso ry adoptions of the enemy not uncommonly practiced by the Indians in times of hostility. Be this as it may, the Zunis abandoned all their towns in the valley, and taking the good priest with them, fled yet again to the top of their high Moun tain of Thunder. Around an ample amphitheater near its southern rim, they rebuilt six or seven great clusters of stone houses and renewed in the minature vales of the mesa summit the reservoirs for rain and snow, and on the crests above the trickling spring under their towns, and along the upper reaches of t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

fwspinpww yw-rYT Tpi.r TiwTpi 66 The Inijian Advocatk. on the sunlit sand slopes, 800 feet below the northern crest of the mesa their fathers so well defended in those days, Vargas camped his army, with intent to besiege the heathen tenegades, and to .harass and pick off such stragglers as came within the range of his arquebuses. Now, however, the good friar whom "the Indians called Kwan Tatchui Lok'yana ("Juan Gray-rofoed-father-of-us",) was called to council by the elders, and given a well-scraped piece of deerskin, whitened with prayer meal, and some bits of cinder, wherewith to make markings of meaning to his coun trymen. And he was bidden to mark thereon that the Zunis were good to those who, like him, were good to them and meddled not; nor would they harm any who did not harm their women and children, and their elders. And that if such these captains and their warriors would but choose and promise to be, they would descend from their mountain, nor stretch their bowstrings more...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

p'w,!V'wni,nreiR5IjrT!: Thk Indian Advocatk. 67 and harvest, chiefly at three of their easternmost towns, and" the central one of Halona Itiwana, the Zuni of to-day. After the reconquest at last some of the missions were rehabilitated, and missionaries dwelt with the Zunis now and again. But other chiefs than those chosen by the priestly elders of the people were thenceforward chosen by the Spaniards to watch . the people gobernador, alcalde, and tenientes, and these in turn were watched by Spanish soldiers whose conduct favored i:V ' little the fostering of good will and happy relations; for in 1703, &'. . goaded to desparation by the excesses of these resident police, -''" the Zunis drove at least three of them into the church and 'f-' there massacred them. Then, according to their want, they JF ' ' fled, for the last time, to the top of Thunder mountain, 7.-- '-. ' When they finally descended they planted numerous peach gfj: -.'' - orchards among the cliffs and terraces of Gr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

68 The Indian Advocate. as the hands and the various fingers of those who made them; '. for the large plumed messages to the winds and spaces often betrayed the people, and they must now needs be made of size convenient for burial or hiding away in crannies or under bushes as near as might be to the schrines of the sacred precincts where 'once the fathers had worshiped so freely. Toward the end of the century, between 1775 and 1780, the old Church of Our Lady of Guadalupe, which now harbors only burros and shivering dogs of cold winter nights and is toppling to ruin in the middle of the grand plaza of Zuni, was built and heautifully decorated with carved altar pieces and paintings, gifts from the king of Spain to the Indies and work of resident monks as well. Its walls were painted as the more recent plasterings scaling off here and there revealed by Zuni artists, who scrupled not to mingle many a pagan symbol of the gods of wind, rain and lightning, sunlight, storm-dark and tempest...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1901

Cy-XTTTT "-"-tttj rrlTW, ,,iB' ft,inh3fli-V - Thk Indian Advocate. , 67 I heard given only a few years since toaged Zuni friends now passed away, that, standing out clearly from the midst of the formal Spanish phrases of these old-time books, they seem like the voices of the dead of other generations, and they tell even more clearly than such voices could tell of the causes which worked to render the Zunis of those times apparently so reconciled to Spanish teaching and domination. So, in following ifurther the Spanish history of Zuni, we need not be surprised that all went well far a while after the completion of the church, and that more than twenty priests were at one time and another resident missionaries of Zuni. Nor, on the other hand, need we be surprised that when in the early part of the present century these missionaries began to leave the pagan surnames out of their registers giving Spanish names instead began to suspect, perhaps, the nature of the wall paintings, or for s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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