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Elephind.com contains 3,232 items from Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 3 April 1895

1895. 5 Bo jk.c3.voo ate. r4 aire usurers who liva off the industry of others. Nebraska's Populist governor is hav ing a hard taak keeping that disreput able republican legislature from utterly disgracing the state. He nearly failed the other day when the senators en gaged in a row in thejchambar. Senator Stewart was called to order while speak ing on the tax bill, and upou his ignor ing the chair the sergeant-at-arms was called for. He refused to sit down and the two men scuffled for a moment. Then the sergeant-at-arms grasped the sena tor's long chin whiskers with hia right hand. In the meantime the senators and spectators had gathered in a circle around the struggling men. Senator Jeffries exoitedly elbowed his way through the crowd to the center and undertook to assault the sergeant-at-arms. Senators McKeeby and Hitch, cock at once forced him back to his seat. Dale, another s ana tor, sprang into the melee and grasped the sergeant at arms. Senator Sloan threw himself upon Senato...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 3 April 1895

8 APB.J THE CAPITAL FLOPS AGAIN. With the past record of tho Capi tal and its editor before them it will be a matter of little snrpise to Kansas readers to learn that the pa per ia agaia oat for free coinage of silver. Ia the issue of March 28, commenting upon the recent utter Ence3 of Governor MuKinley, we find the following: We hare been a warm admirer of this great statesman. We bettered he would be an ideal candidate to oarry the party to triumphant suooesa in 1896. We confess to a sense of keenest disappointment in these utteranoes of Gavernor MoKinley because no man can be nominated by the republi can party for president in 1896 who astajo xuzss the silver sentiment of the oountry. The financial question will be the great issue in the national campaign of 1896, and platforms must drop the glittering general ities of the past upon money and say dis tinctly what function they desire silver to havei at what ratio it shall be ooined, and whether it shall be free or restricted, as ...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 3 April 1895

ISO 5. Leg&i Tender Decisions. NO. VIII. Editor Advocate: Congress by an act on May 31, 1878, forbade the further retirement of greenbacks and provided for the re-issue of such as came into the treasury. This action was bitterly resented by the friends of contraction. An opportunity soon oc curred to take the matter into the courts. A citizen of Connecticut named Greenman owed a citizen of New York named Juillard the sum of 5,122.90. The debtor tendered a 85,000 and a $100 treasury note, $22.50 in gold and 40 cents in silver. The creditor accepted the gold and silver but rejected the notes and then brought suit for $5,100. The suit was carried from a lower court to the supreme court of the United States and was decided in the latter court on March 3, 1884. It may be worthy of mention that in the re port of the case, over thirteen pages are devoted to the argument of counsel against the greenback, while on the other side it is curtly stated that there appeared: "Mr. Benjamin F. B...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 3 April 1895

0 Txo ilcivooato. APR. 3 NOTES. What Kansas needed was a "business administration." Great, isn't it? Sol Miller has been fixed but how much cash be got in advance has cot been publicly stated. The supreme court is cow being held in the eenate chamber, and the justices have rooms on the same floor. It begins to look as if Warden Chase would have mora fun out of the "inves tigation" than the investigators them selves. If Governor Morrill's contingent fund is cot sufficient to pay the expense of "investigating committees' he should call on the republican campaign commit tea for more. B. P. Waggener, the Missouri Paoifio lawyer and political boss of Atchison waaa candidate for mayor against a woman. He knows more about suffrage than ha did before the election. A fire in Haya City on Saturday de stroyed a number of buildings. The loss is estimated at $70,000 but reports do cot say whether the valuation was based on boom prices, present prices, or insurance policies. The new board of publ...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 3 April 1895

1895. 9 ZLd.vooato. P0LITI03 IU THE PULPIT. (Continued Jrom pags 1.) be henceforth his 'own philosopher.' And thia reason knows no limits. God would have it bo. Even God'a revela tion of Himself must commend itself to man. 'Come now and let us reason to gether, saith the lord. Never before was the human mind so unyoked as now. Its field is the universe and no narrow walla built by churoh or state can hedge it in. A great many people seem shocked when we talk about rea soning on divine things, aa if faith, like certain patent medicines, in order to re tain its virtues, should be 'kept in the dark.' No; faith ia a child of the light and would ever be guided on ita way by the stars that blaza ia the heaven of truth. Every man his own philosopher! Dancer here? Oh, yes, life ia always ia peril, but highest good, too, and highest happiness. "Wears not surprised to hear this also called the age cf democracy. In truth it is. There was never more of untruth put io any single senterce than ou...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 3 April 1895

10 The Advooata APS. J More About Money. Editor Advocate: In my last little squib upon money, my allusion to Brother W. C. Nelson's money the ory as not quite meeting my Ideal of money, it seems he thinks me lncon si3tant, to say the least. To call his system a book-keeping idea is no dis credit (nor was it intended to be) when we remember that Venice virtually controlled the fiinancial world for 600 years by a system of banking that was wholly book-keeping. That I called the greenbacks notes is true, but I did it in the popular way of speaking of them. But that they were notes in the common sense of showing indebted ness I deny. I claim that the green backs were money and that money meant more than receipt, check or warrant. It is true they might have been designated checks, warrants or receipts, but being clothed with the powers they were, they would, and the greenback did, become money. That by law they were made everything that coined gold or silver ever was, except in two cases...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 3 April 1895

11 1895 Advooat n Why Gold Is Exported Our Debt to Europe. Editor Advocate: The "balance of trade" ia a fruitful topio of considara tioa by and between all civilized and commercial nations; and tit very plain and palpable reasons the same that ob tain in the economy of private life. For if an individual or a family buys mora thai it Belle, or expends more than it re ceives, it must come to grief in the Ions; ran. So with states and nations. If the balance of trade is habitually and largely against any people, that is, their exports fall short of paying for their im ports, the balance becomes a debt, and must be discharged in money; and thus they are trenching on their capital, and living beyond their means. Thus far, with regard to commercial balances of trade. Bat there has sprucg up with us a different balance of trade (so to epeak), and one more important and more to be dreaded then the other. I refer to the dead weight resulting from money bor rowed and debts incurred to foreign...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 3 April 1895

12 IPS. s iS, ia equal to all that ia brought to ths United States yearly by tba immigrants, cad by the Europeans, South Ameri cans, eto., who come here for pleasure trips. "Nor must it be forgotten that Europe in a large holder of American eeonritiea of all kinds of railroads, manufactur ing corporations, etc. and that at least 50 Jiillion dollars ia sent aoross the ocean yearly in the form of interest and dividends. Hence the actual foreign commerce account properly made up would stand ai follows: Value of imports at place of manu facture or shipment $ 827,000,000 Ten per cent, extra for carrying 80 percent of imports in foreign ships 65,700,000 Expenses of American tourists ... 100,000,000 Interest and dividends paid to Eu rope 50,000,000 $1,042,700,000 .$1,030,000,000 in an irrigated country ia an abundance of water. In this the San Luis valley surely ranks first. In the spring they usually'hava a fall of moisture sufficient to start the crops growing. In July and August they ha...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 3 April 1895

13 1895 ALLIANCE DEPARTMENT. DIKECTOBY. President J. F. Willita, McLouth Vice President Mrs. Emma Troudner. Carbondale Seoretary J. B. French, Topeka Lecturer Hon. J. G.Otis, Topeka Assistant Lecturer U. W. Ames, Osborne DEPARTMENT WORK. BOARD. J. F. Maxey, Chairman Ottawa J. B. French. Secretary Topeka J. P. Stephens Wellsvllle Mrs. Emma Troudner Carbondale Mrs. L. E. Furbeck Topeka Mrs.E.M.Wardall Topeka STATE MANAGERS. Agriculture A. F. Allen, Vlnland Horticulture J. H. Darsch, Garnett Floriculture W. H. Coultls.Tevls Bee-keeping. . .Mrs. Thos. Strawbridge, Ottawa Domestic Economy Mrs. Lydia E. Furbeck, Topeka Dairying Mrs. Blna A. Otis, Topeka Entertainments and Exhibits Mrs. Emma Troudner, Carbondale Improved Farm Machinery . J. F. Maxey, Ottawa Political Economy and Parliamentary Laws ...J. P. Stevens, wellsvllle Co-operate Commerce and Finance Robert Hanson, Concordia Fire Insurance H. Baughman, Burrton Life Insurance S.D. Cooley, Topeka General Cultuie... Mrs. E. M. Wardall,...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 3 April 1895

14 Tile Advo o ate. APE. 5 Fi n p i n a Travci is Lt AJ IV I U I commodate!! In the Through Pullman Buffet Sleeping Cars running over the lines of the Louis I ville & Nashville Railroad. This line runs double daily (morning and evening depart ure) trains from St. Louis, Evansvllle, and Louisville to the principal Southern cities. This line Is many miles the shortest between the Northwest and Southeast. " This line has double dally sleeping car service to Jackson ville all the year round. This line is many hours quickest to Southeastern cities. The passenger equipment of this line Is not excelled la the South. L Winter Tourists' Tickets at low round trip rates on sale from about November 1st, ffood till May 31st. - Full Information cheerfully furnished upon application to GEO. B. HORNER, Div. Pass. Agt., St. Louis, C. P. ATMORE, Gen' I Pass. Agt., Loulsvlll Write for description of THE GULF C0AS1 A Is, Mo. W .,Ky. O THE GREKT mm SYSTEM. Ocanoclinj tba Commercial Centers and rich ...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 3 April 1895

toil nnts For the Year 1894., Made By Com panies Doing- Business in the State of Kansas. Fire Insurance American Insurance Co. Newark, N. J. Paid-up capital $ COO.000 00 Net surplus, January 1, 1895 1301.070 82 Gross assets. January 1,1805 2,450.10) 81 Liabilities, January 1, 1895 649,038 39 Income In 1894 637,604 65 Expenditures in 1894 540,001 20 Etna Insurance Go. Hartford, Conn. Paid-up capital $4,000,000 00 Nat surnlus (not including capital) 3.197347 27 Assets 10347316 36 Liabilities (including paid-up cap ital and net surplus) 10,847316 36 Income 4,446,305 67 Expenditures 4350,947 42 Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. Hartford, Conn. Paid-up capital $1,000,000 00 Net surplus, not including capital. 444,409 69 Assets. 2.972,632 79 Liabilities 1328,223 10 Income 1,785,595 06 Expenditures J,vti,vw w The Concordia Fire Insurance Co. Milwaukee, Wis. Paid-up capital $200,000 CO Net surplus, not Including capital. . . 71,526 82 Assets . 698,708 17 Liabilities 427,241 35 Income 441,796 0...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 3 April 1895

13 TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL STATEMENT uiciip Mutual Life Insurance Company OF DETROIT, MICH., Tor the Year Ending Dec. 31, 1894. REVENUE ACCOUNT. Received for Premiums $1,106,588 08 Received for Interest and Rents 235,692 19 Total Income T $1,342,280 27 Disbursements for Death Claims, Dividends, Matured Insurance, Surrender Values, and all Expenses 9.36,546 04 Balance to Investment Account $ 885,734 23 ASSET ACCOUNT. Cash In Bank $ 181,787 08 First Mortgage Liens on Real EBtate 3,326,311 76 Real Estate, Including Home Office Building 430,377 90 Loans to Policy-holders Secured by Reserves 421318 65 Agents' Balances 8,841 24 Bills Receivable 48,332 27 Bonds and Collaterals 40,823 75 Interest and Rents Accrued 71,061 85 Interest and Rents Due 44,019 10 Outstanding Premiums, Secured by Reserve Fund 317,724 30 Deferred Premiums, Secured by Reserve Fund 42.409 38 Total Assets $4,963,007 28 LIABILITIES. Amount of Reserve Fund, American Table (4 per cent.) $188,727 56 Deposits of Policy-holder...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 10 April 1895

VOL. VII, NO. 15. TOPEKA, KANSAS, APBIL 10, 1896. $1.00 A YEAP.. Sydney Stone, Anti-Federal. By G. C. CLEMENS, (Author of "The Dead Line.") BOOK I. CHAPTER I. "THE LAW MUST TAKE ITS COURSE." It may be remarked, for the comfort of honest poverty, that avarice reigns most In those who have but few good quali ties to recommend them. This la a weed that will grow In a barren soil Hughes. " There goes old Ike Stilwell I " remarked Job Cot tle, the cabinet-maker, to a group of men and boys In front of his shop, as he pointed to an arrogant looking old man on the opposite side of the street. "I was raised up a good Presbyterian; but he has undermined some of my faith. What's the use tell lng me that folks are to be punished in the next world for the meanness they've done here? Why, for the purpose of tormenting old Ike Stilwell for his deviltry 4 done in the body,' as the preachers say, the hottest kind of hell you could set a-going would ba nothing but a fresh breeze off an iceberg." And ...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 10 April 1895

AFIL 10 ILXNICIPAL owxosnip. " i I iiTiple of How It Is Being Successfully Applied. TLa New York and Brooklyn bridge tric-tructed, owned and operated by cities of New York and Brooklyn, p.il3xd3 perhaps the most striking ex a 'nple of municipal ownership of means c l transportation in the United States. v'.;0 facts concerning the construction s ; d operation of this engineering won- : r of the world have been looked up 7 iiis Voice as a practical contribu ! : a to, the available information on .wiions of municipal ownership Vch confront every American city i? -day. No privilege on the bridge is ; i the hands of a private company, iMpept the electric system for lighting Vh3 cars, which is on trial and will be 1 Arced over to the bridge if it proves c'.llsfactory. In the beginning the Brooklyn bridge 7: 13 a private enterprise. The New York Bridge company was organized Arril 18, 1867. William C. Kingsley, Jchn T. Hoffman, Judge Alex McCue, Andrew II. Green, William M. Tweed : 1 otters...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 10 April 1895

3 ployed when the habit was known, and no such person has been retained when the habit became known. The courtesy and service of the bridge employes compared with that of employes of private methods of transportation in both New York and Brooklyn, is a matter of favorable comment by the public. By act of legislature, taking effect April 12, 1893, the old board of un salaried trustees was superseded by slaaried members whose terms are five years, two appointed from each city by the respective mayors at a salary of 33,000 each, the president to receive 35,000. At the present time the board of trustees consists of two members from Brooklyn, James Howell and Seth L. Keeney; two from New York, Edward , V. Skinner and C. A. Ilenriques, and the mayors and comptrollers of the two cities ex-officio. The officers of the bridge organization are: James Howell, president; E. V. Skinner, vice president; Henry Beam, secretary; Ed ward Clark, treasurer; Charles C. Mar tin, chief engineer and superi...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 10 April 1895

ATZ. 10 r AITD TOPEKA TEE3UNE. it. n. r. a. PUBLISHED EVKST WBDNI8D1.T BT TBB ADVOCATE PUBLISHING CO.. Rooms 43 and 45 Columbian T&l&g. TOPEKA, - - - KANSAS. $1.00 PER YEAR, ADVERTISING RATE3. Single Insertion: Display matter, 15 centa per agate line, (14 lines to Inch). Reading notices, 80 cents per line, (count lines). Copy or electro should reach this office Mon day morning to insure Insertion In following sue. Electros must have metal base, 13-em columns (Stf inches). Entered at the poetoffice at Topeia, Kansas, as second class matter. Interference with free speech leads toward revolution. An exclusive silver party is jnstas worthless as the old-gold parties. There can be no good government without honesty and justice to all. A special session of the republican congress wonld finish the coffin of liberty. Wherever machines take the place of men they should feed the men whom they displaced. The plutocratic hook with a silver bait is just as dangerous as when baited with a...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 10 April 1895

"SSio .Advocate. 1835. as will sot only terminate existing ' t abuses, but prevent their eleotion in the future." i ' The A rkansaa house of representatives t was thro'jrn into an uproar Saturday 1 by Representative Yancey exposing f some of the methods of the Iron Aloun- tain railroad lobby He said that msm l, bera had been bribed in connection with the vote on the railroad commission bill in the house. He bad been approached ' by Representative Raberta and Lawyer Dodge, attorney for the railroad com I pany, 8nd waa told that in consideration , of his vote against the bill $300 or $100 -; would be sent into his county to secure his election to the state senate. He was ' commissioned by Dodge to buy another representative which he thought he could do for $100. He thought over the matter awhile, and concluded to de mand $500 for hia silence, and"flnally gave the whole thing away in open ees sion. Yancey said that the company was entertaining a number of the mem i bers at a hotel, fre...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 10 April 1895

'l !2L3 AdTOOGt APS. 10 LETTEBS FBOH PEOJIINENT MEN TO THE NEW TOSS WOULD. The New York World of March 28 publishes several letters from men prominent in political affairs relative to the present situation and future prospects of parties as they see them. The most important parts of this cor respondence appear in another place in this issue. It will be observed that there is considerable difference of opinion among the writers relative to the ex act propositions which the next na tional platform of the reform forces should contain. It will be observed farther that they all agree that there is to be a new party in 1896, which they presume will be able to unite all of the various reform elements as well as the disaffected of the old parties. If the reader will reflect for a moment upon the general tenor of these letters he will probably con clude with us that the sentiment ex pressed with regard to the probabil ity of a new party is too unanimous to be purely accidental. Here are nine...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 10 April 1895

1835. an opportunity fob phuutthsop. ISTS. If millionaire philanthropists are looking for an opportunity to do something that will be a permanent benefit to mankind, they cannot do better than famish means for the purchase of land and the establish ment of co-operative colonies where those who are ont of employment may build homes and provide for the necessities of themselves and those dependant npon them. It would be far better than found ing colleges or libraries. Where is the philanthropist who will set the example for others to follow? If this movement could once be made popular, every idle, hungry and homeless man and woman might soon become self-sustaining, com fortable and happy. MU3T HPVE FOREIGN WAK TO PE VICNT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE. There are wars and rumors of wars, and unless someone baoks tight down and out, there will be some more wars soon. It would appear that it is time for them, if we judge by the history of the world. There are too many people, and theio is too little...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 10 April 1895

APS. 10 xiioj Stone, Anti-Federal. Continued from page 1. ul been thinking; of him, and she had experienced i i linj quite new to her. I !::n377 hardened old men of the world sneer at the " :zct "love at first sight," as sentimental non But so much has been written by learned : concerning love at first sight that it would be io doubt its possibility or even its frequent oc .:,,':v;C9. Not only did Shakespeare boldly ask: Whoever lov'd that lov'd not at first sight? tat sedate philosopher, that great apostle of , virdlaa, Schopenhauer, declared that "great pas 1 3i as a rule, arise at first sight." Another mod n philosopher has asserted that "the love which : a suddenly takes longest to cure," and seems : think that "love which grows slowly and by . ,rc23" may do for friendship, but does not : cuaS to much "as an ardent passion." Of course, iica explains it all in its dreary way, as it ex 'riS everything beautiful or loveable in life. ! t ta your speculative science which seeks to dr...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
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