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Title: Princeton Union, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 15,376 items from Princeton Union, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 3 February 1881

.US'* VENTS O THE NEEBLrE. "Ob. Maryanne, you pretty girl. Intent on silky labor, Of seamstresses the pink and pearl, Excuse a peeping neighbor! Those eyes, forever drooping, givo The long, brown laehea rarely Bnt violets in the shadows live For once nnveil them fairly. Hast thon not lent that flounce enough Of looks so long and earnest Lo 1 here's more penetrable stuff," To which thou never turnest. Ye graceful fingers, deftly sped How slender and how nimble Oh, might I wind their skeins of thread. Or but pick up their thimble I How blest the youth whom love aboil bring, And happy stars embolden, '"o change the dome into a ring. The silver into golden I Who'll steal some morning to hor side To take her finger's measure, While Haryanne pretends to cnldo, And blushes deep with pleasure? Who'll watch her sew her wedding gown. Well conscious that it is hers Who'll glean a tress without a frown. With these so-ready scissors Who'll taste those ripenings of the South, The fragrant and del...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 3 February 1881

1' ISITWOBXH WHILE? JOAQUIN IQLLXR. Is it worth while that we jostle a brother, Bearing his load on the rough road of life? Is it worth while that we jeer at each other, In blackness of heart that we war to the knifee God pity ns all in our pitiful strife. God pity us all we jostle each other God pardon us all for the triumphs we feel When a fellow goes down 'neath his load on the heather, Pierced to the heart, Words are keener than Steel, And mighter far for woe than for weal. Were it not well in this brief little journey On over the isthmus, down into the tide, We give him a fish instead of a erpent, Ere folding the hands to be and abide Forever and aye in dust at his side? Look at the roses suluting each other, Look at the herds all at peace on the plain Man, andman only, makes war on his brother, And laughs inhis heart at his periland pain Shamed by the beasts that go down on the plain. Is it worth while that we battle to humble Some poor fellow down into the dust? God pity us a...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 3 February 1881

THE LUCKY HORSESHOE. A farmer traveling with his load o'- 1 Picked up a horseshoe on the road, And nailed it fast to his barn door, That Luck might down upon him pour That every blessing known in life Might crown his homestead and his wife, And never any kind of harm Descend upon his growing farm. But dire ill-fortune soon began To visit the astounded man. His hens declined to lay their eggs His bacon tumbled from the pegs, Aad rats devoured the fallen legs His corn, that never failed before, Mildewed and rotted on the floor: His grass refused to end in hay, His cattle died, or went astray In short, all went the crooked way. Next spring a great draft baked the sod, And roasted every pea in pod The beans declared they could not grow So long as nature acted so. Redundant insects reared their brood To starve for lack of juicy food The staves from barrel sides went off As if they had the hooping cough, And nothing of the youthful kind To hold together felt inclined In short, it was no u...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 3 February 1881

4k THE ENGINEER'S nUUDER, I HENEY MOBFOBD. ~*Tes, 1 once committed a murder, Outside of the realms of law, That I s'pose the body of people would not heed lha worth of a straw Bt I think I should e'eep the sounder, Sometimes when the night winds wail, 11 never remembered the murder,' Or never told over the tale. No mstter the road I was running, In one of the Middle States. So many years since that I wonder "Why the sorrow never abates. I was young, and ty, and savage, Aa youth is apt to And my handmy hand, you wfll fancy Was a trifle too ready and/ree. I was in my caboose just at evening, Say 'tween Holden and Tiddler's Bun, Making time to reach Wayman'u siding For the up-train, atfivetwenty-one I had had a hot box at Grossman's, And that put mo foar minutes behind Bo I felt Jikethe word is ugly, But the tiuthlike going it blind!' "Bound the curve, and runningsay forty Or it may ha\e been fiftywho knows, And there on the track, before me, A black fiend at full scream, arose A dog t...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 3 February 1881

4?" THE EDITORIAL COUNCIL. Fourteenth Annual Session of the Minnesota Editorial Convention at St. Paul. Pursuant to call, the Minnesota Editorial Fraternity met in council at St. Paul, on Jan. 26, in the rooms of the Chamber of Commerce, that body having kindly tendered the use of the chamber for that purpose, the following members being present: W. J. Whipple, Winona Herald. J. A. Leonard, Rochester Post. W. J. Munro, Morris Tribune. H. P. Hall, St. Paul Globe. W. A. Uotchkiss, Minneapolis Republican. C. B. Sleeper, Brainerd Tribune. D. Ramalcy, St. Paul Type Foundry. R. C. Mitchell, Duluth Tribune. W. C. Whiteman, Herman Herald. H. A. Castle, journalist at large. A. Dewey, Fishers Landing Bulletin. A. E. Bunker, Western Newspaper Union. P. Drisooll, St. Paul Pioneer Press. S. H. Watson, St. Paul Dispatch. H. Mattson, Staats Tidning. F. M. Gove, Benton, Gove & Co., type founders. J. K. Arnold, secretary. C. H. Liueau, Volkszeitung, St. Paul. F. Belfoy, News-Ledger, Litchfield. ...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 3 February 1881

H.V-' "^X V", I Business has been uncommonly dull iu town this week. "Stormy weather this week and local items are scarcer than hen's teeth. Read the thirteen reasons why Triumph Seeder excels all others. We learn that Elmer Whitney has rented the feed mill from Mr. John Itodgera. For the time being, Lou Steadman is as blind as a bat. He caught cold and it has settled in his eyes. Next week Kines expects to receive a consignment of bis new spring goods. Then look out for bargains. We are glad to learn that Dave lough was not seriously injured in the railroad smash up below Elk Riv er, on Wednesday. Ed. Cilley's little daughter has been quite sick with lung fever, and, as though one affliction was not enough, has now an attack of the mumps. Miss May llannay, of Wyanett, commences a three months school term in Isanti, this week. Miss Han nay is another favorite school teacher. There were dances in Jesmer's hall last Thursday and Friday nights, and there is to be one this Friday night....

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 17 February 1881

%&**+*& *p I, *P* *T*' 'J*- E i? JL SENBRAL MAIN STREET, fe-' .-tirtCrS, anp wsnu^ui'SJS'^iiiUSi op-' ^"fvafim Prescriptions Carefully Compounded at All Hours of the Day Or Night. Tha Best Assortment of Goods in tins Line North of St. Paul and Minneapolis. .Drugs. Chemicals, Patent Medicines, Oils, Paints, Dyes, Colors, Per fumery, Lamj: lustr Cigars, Tobacco, &c. &c. lie Singer and Saw American Sewing Machines Always on Hani ani fo: Sale Cheap Dealers in Drugs,'' Medicines, Notions and Toilet Goods. Also Auents lor the ."KO.NEXPLOSIVE LAMP COMPANY," Call ani Learn Sly htos. to Show Bods, I Will Not Se Undersold "igig'AU Kinds of Farmers' Produce Taken in Exchange for Merchandise, The Old Un-Reliable Firm of H. B. COWLE S & As Usual are in the Maiket With a LARGE AND CAREFULLY SELECTED STOCK OF ALL or WHICH WE WILL SELL AT fSlCES 10 IBS TIKES, o Aid we Cordially Invite Purchasers to Give us a Call Before Purchasing Their Fall Supplies, as we Will Guarantee to Sel...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 17 February 1881

*&$ WU ^miction ^niou.**)&& R. C. DUNN, Publisher. Tei ms-$2.00 per year in advance. CURRENT OPINION. DURING the year 1880, 512,931,224 letters, 163,048,912 postal-cards, 496, 706,132 newspapers, making in all 1,605,502,802 pieces, were passed through the United States mails. THE official figures give Pennsyl vania a population of 4,282,786, of which 85,680 are colored. The native population number 3,695,253, and the foreign-horn population 587,533. ON condition that the steamers are of iron, and are manned by Americans, the senate committee on postoffices has agreed to an appropriation of &1,- 000,000 for the encouragement of for eign mail service during the year. AUGUSTUS M. WILEY, who recently died in Arkansas, was the negotiator of an Indian treaty at Council Bluffs by which the site of the city of Kan kakee was secured. He was also the first sheriff of Tippecanoe county, Indiana. THE remains of the great Carlyle repose in the quietude of St. Sechans' churchyard,...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 17 February 1881

isp^r* i/*4' fW THE OUTCAST. Jostle him out from the warmth and light Only a vagrant, feeble and gray, Let him *eel on through the stormy night What though his homo be tar away? With a muttered curee on the wind and rain He crept along through the muddy lane. Lonely the pathway, and dark and cold Shelter he sought neat a ruined wall Over his senses a numbness stole, Bound him Sleep threw her mystic pall Then an angel came \*ith pitying tears, And lifted the veil of by-gone years. Gayly he sporta by a rippling broos Soft is the breath of the summer air Flowers adorn each mossy nook. Sunshine and happiness everywhere He is Willie now, just four years old, With his rose-bud lipB and curls of gold. Hark to the roll of the war-like drum See the brave soldiers go marching by 1 Home from tbe battle young Will has come, Courage and joy in hie sparkling eye And his pulses thrill *ith hope and pndo, For he soon will greet his promised bride. Now in the Breaide's flickering glow Calmly he's ta...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 17 February 1881

\y 4 r, If rib A LUMP OF CARBON. Tell me, lump of carbon burning, Lurid in the glowing grate, While thyflamesare twisting, turning, Quench in mc this curious yearning, Ages past elucidate. Tell me of the time when waving High above the primal world, Thou, a giant palm-tree, lifting Thy proud head above the shifting Of the storm-cloud's lightning hurled, While the tropic sea. hot laving, Round thy roots its billows curled. Tell me, did the mammoth, 6traying Near that mighty trunk of yours, On the verdure stop and gaze, Which thy ample base displays, Or his weary limbs down laying, Sleep away the tardy hours Perchance some monster saurian, sliding, Waddled up the neighboring strand Or leapt into its native sea With something of agility, Though all ungainly on the land While near your roots, blood-stained fray, Maybe two ichthyc beasts colliding, Bit and fought their lives away. Tell me, ancient palm-corpse, was there In that world of yours primeval, Aught of men in perfect shape Was t...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 17 February 1881

IN THE MINING TOWN. 'Tie the last time, darling," he gently said, As he kissed her lips like the cherries red, While a fond look shone in his eyes of brown, My own is the prettiest girl in town To-morrow the hell from the tower will ring, A joyful peal. Was there ever a king So truly blest on his royal throne, As I shall be when I claim my own 'Twas a fond farewell, 'twas a sweet good bye, But she watched him g with a troubled sigh. So, into the basket that swayed and swung O'er the yawning abyss, he lightly sprung, And the joy of her heart seemed turned to woe, As they lowered him into the depths below. Her sweet young face, with its tresses brown, Was the fairest face in the mining town. Lo! the morning came but the marriage bell, High up in the tower, rang a mournful knell For the true heart buried 'neath earth and stone, Far down in the heart of the minealone. A sorrowful peal, on their wedding daj, For the breaking heart and the heart of clay. And the face that looked from her ...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 17 February 1881

WHERE IS YESTERDAY.' Mother I some things I want to know, Whiph puzzle and confnse me so. To-day is present, as you Bay But tell me, where ia yesterday I did not see it as it went, I only know how it was spent In play, and pleasure, through the rain Then why won't at come back again? To-day the sun shines bright and c'car But then, to-morrow's drawing near. To-dayoh, do not go away And vanish like dear yesterday. 'Tis when the sun and all the light Have gone, and darkness brings the night, It seems to JJJP, JOU steal away, And change jour name to yesterday. And vii]' all time be just the same? To-daythe only name remains? And shall I always have to Bay, To-monow you'll be yesterday? I wonder, when we go to heaven, If there a record will be given Of all our thoughts and all our ways, Writ on the face of jesterdays? If so, I pray God grant to me That mine a noble life may be For then, I'll greet with joyous gaze The dear, lost face ofyesterdays. Chamber*' Journal. CAPTURED BY HAGUS. I...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 17 February 1881

i^i*- :..v.tv^A.s*a**i-'JJJJ A .*4*" JOKES FROM HARPER 4j E was an Episcopal clergyman, and a great lover of the great American game, who inadvertently remarked, at the end of that portion of scripture ap pointed to be read, Here endeth the first innings." A CUIBICAII friend who had just re turned to town from the country was speaking of funerals, and said We had another evening tuneral service at 8 o'clock." This being the second occur rence of the kind a 10-year-old boy in quired, with a keen sense of the slow ness of country funeral processions, "Papa, what do they have 'em at night for ?so as they can trot EiiDKR GEORGE CHAMPLIN, preached many years in Rhode Island. was a colored man, but sharp and witty and withal of good sense, though not without some failings. At one time some of his hearers complained that he was per sonal and severe in some of his remarks. Elder C. replied, When I am preach ing I Bhoot right at the devil every time, and if any one gets between me and the de...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 17 February 1881

V1 .r Bran far ale a* Newton's. Beans and Potatoes Wanted at RINES' Call at Newton's and get some good bran. "Judge- not and ye shall not be judged.'" Mr. arid Mrs. Elmer Whitney have fc-t up house-keeping in their rooms opposite E. A Ross' residence. There was a dance at the Court House Hall, Tuesday night we un- derstand the turn out was noc very large. A. P. Barker may he seen at all hours of the day, rushing about town .attending to the business which accu- mulated during his absence. The "8 to 12" dancing club died a very natural death last week no ef- forts were made to save its life, and it lies unlamented, though not quite forgotten. Choice home made pickles at H. B. COWLES & Co's. William Frasier was badly injured last week, at his camp on the Missis sippi, by a tree falling on him. was taken to his home in Minneapolis, Wanted. Beef, beans and potatoes, for which we will pay the highest market price. B. COWI.ES & Co. Mrs. E Chesley, daughter of G. W. Nesbitt, of Cam...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 24 February 1881

#r ^'Iffl*' W*WW "^f */x MAIN STREET, tlAIN STREET, Prescriptions Carefully Compounded at All Hours of the Day Or Night, Tb JBest Assortment of Goods in this Line North of St. Paul and Minneapolis. Drugs* Chemicals, Patent Medicines, Oils, Paints, Dyes, Colors, Per- fumery, Lamps, Brackets, Toilet Requisites, Combs, Musical ..Instruments, Trusses, Pocket Books, Pocket Knives.Stationary,Candies Cigars, i'obaeco,&c.&c. lkt and Kew Aawlc&u Seviag Mmi Ahajs oa S&nd and for Sab Ckp J. Mahoney & Co Dealers in __ ,x gs, Medicines, Notions and Toilet Goods. Also Arent tor the "NO.NEXPLOSIVE LAMP COMPANY," Of Cleveland. Peecviptions Carefully Compounded and at the LOWEST PRICES N. E. JESMER, Dealer in 3E:NE:RAL. MERCHANDISE A Large Stock of JL\AA ABOARD FOR THE taple and Fancy Groceries, General and Fancy Dry Goods. Notions, Men an^ JBoys' Ready Made Clothing, Hats and Caps, Boots and Shoes, Glassware, China and Stoneware, Cigars and Tobacco. The Finest Stock of Choice Ca...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 24 February 1881

b* Princeton ^toww. R. C. DUNN, Publisher. Terms:2.00per year in advance. CURRENT TOPICS. 4' To use a Board of Trade phrase, now is the time to sell short on snow. It is continually coming down. S&ll it differs from stocks, because the more it falls the higher it gets on the street. A BELFAST (Me.) man has succeeded in writing all President Hayes1 last message on a postal card, which the same he sent to Hayes, who biograph ed a reply suitable to the solemn oc casion. A the council of ministers at Paris it was announced that the proposal of Prance for an international monetary conference this year has been accepted by the United States, so far as regards the double standard. NO NE of the seats in the senate chamber at Washington are ever re moved. When broken, as will some times happen, they are carefully re paired and returned. As a rule the seats now used by senators have sur vived generations of users, and hardly one is without its history. SOME of the stalwart politicians of ...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 24 February 1881

f'oaa(^fewji)S(Wi*ts'i A ^%W 'ft* GOSSIP FOR THE L, m^* Charlie's Sister* ^'t"*You've seen her, you say "JMerry and fair is she As sunniest day in May, Eyes blue and roguish, Tfet earnest and tender Cheeks rosy, lips smiting _, Once seen, she's remembered! And, wifejshe kissed me Kissed you, indeed' how queer! Why, Charlie is twenty, and she's pretty, oh, dear! And kissed you' I think" There, darling, don't pout! Yes, Charlie is twenty, from college just ont, But she's only three Lack of Knowledge. A pretty woman generally knows she is pretty, and counts upon the effect her beauty produces upon the other sex. Isn't it strange that she never knows when she is the other thing We can all put up with a good deal of simpering nonsense from a pretty girl, but a home ly damsel must deport herself with straight-laced decorum or she makes herself ridiculous. Perhaps it is unfair, but the world will have it so, and it stands an inexorable law. Parisian Women's Underclotbeu. No Pans woman who ...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 24 February 1881

*& ^atmmJ' ,:-'W "rP??f 'i?-^ tkl ASLEEP. hf *^H ROSE TERRY COOKS. In summer-time how fair it showed! My garden by the Tillage road, Where fiery stalks of blossoms glowed, And roses softly blushed With azure spires and garlands white, Pale heliotrope, the sun's delight, And odors that perfumed the night Where'er the south wind rushed. There solemn, purple pansies stood, Gay tulips, red with floral blood, And wild things fresh from field and wood, Alive with dainty grace. Deep heaven-blue bells of columbine, The darkly mystic passion vine, And clematis, that loves to twine, Bedecked that happy place. Beneath the strong, unclouded blaze Of long and fervent summer days Their colors smote the passing gaze, And dazzled every eye. Their cups of scented honey-dew Charmed all the bees that o'er them flew, And butterflies of radiant hue Paused as they floated by. Now falls a cloud of sailing snow, The bitter winds of winter blow, No blossom dares its cup to show Earth folds them in her b...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 24 February 1881

^ugs&mpmwua fwm if 1 1 1 1 4 LATE TO CHURCH., Along the road on either side, The elder boughs are* budding j The meadow lands a rosy tide Of clover bloom is flooding The sunny landscape is so fair, So sweet the blossom-scented air, That, when I went to church to-day, I could but choose the longest way. Loud sang the bobolinks, and 'round The milkweed flowers the bees were hum ming, I sauntered on, but soon I found Behind me some one coming. I did not turn my head to see, And yet I knew who followed me, Before Tom called me, Kitty, Btay, And let me share with you the way." We did not mind our steps grow slow, Nor notice when the bell stopped ringing, Nor think of being late but lo When we had reached the church, the sing ing Was over, and the prayer was done The sermon fairly was begun' Should we go in Should we stay out Press boldly in, or turn about Tom led the way, and up the aisle I followedall around were staring, And here and there I caught a smile I tried to think I was no...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Princeton union. — 24 February 1881

I***T$ A BAOHELOR'S SIGHS. A life misspent, an incompleted mission, A. house all void of me/ry laugh Pertain unto that fractional condition Of man without abetter half. !No one to cheer him in thia world's unrest, And soothe a debt-bemuddled brain No love with fertile fancy to suggest Some way to raise the wind" again. No one to laugh with him when all is bright, Nor weep when joys seem over gone Alas! no Angers, deft and white, Jo sow a missing button on. No pure-white brow, no love-lit eyes of blue, No tresses moved by summer breeze Ah me 1 no dewy lips of rosy hue, No ling'ring, soft, white hand to squeeze. M^U' No sympathetic hope of morn of life. Nor memory when he is old So sad the thought! no meek and gentle wife To sneer at when the coffee's cold. And duties over, when the long day dies, No need of gentle wifely tones, No one to ask with glad, expecting eyes, Dear, did you get the best of Jones?" Of earthly joys and pleasures he is bare. He has no hope of heaven withal No sc...

Publication Title: Princeton Union, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
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