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Elephind.com contains 351 items from Wytheville Dispatch, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 25 November 1863

HITHEVILLE DISPATCH. VOL. 111. WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. PUBLISHED SEMI-WEEKLY. 1). A. ST. CLAIR, Proprietor. TERMS. The Dispatch is furnished to subscribers at $2.50 f0r six months, $1.50 for three months, single copies, 10 cts. ADVERTISING. One sqnare{ 10 lines) or less, one insertion, §I,OO. Each additional, 50 cents. Liberal deduction made to yearly or Quarterly advertisers. Announcements of Candidates will be inserted for % 5.00 in advance. Speak Kindly. BY JENNY WOOBINE. Speak kindly to the erring one— Strive by a gentle word To soothe the hearts of those by whom Kind words are seldom heard; And never to the human heart, By word or deed give pain ; For when the arrow's planted there, There long it will remain. Speak kindly to the grief bow'd one— Grief too may visit thee, And dim thy bright and radianteyeThou knowest such can be. Then add no shade to the pale face That e'er must wear a cloud. By idle jests pain not the ear Of those in anguish bowed. Speak kindly to the suffering po...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 25 November 1863

WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. WEDNESDAY, NOV. 25, 1863 Yankee Schemes. The results of the recent elections at the North have encouraged the Yankees to make renewed exertions for the overthrow and subjugation of the South. They now boldly talk how they will treat us when they get the Confederate States under the dominion of Abraham Lincoln. All talk about peace, on any terms short of abject submission, has ceased at the North, and the talk now is as to how we, of the South, are to be managed. Their prominent men are writing letters to each other and discussing the matter to their own satisfaction. In the first place, they propose to treat the Southern States as conquered teritory, displacing the duly elected Governors, and appointing Governors for us from Yankeeland, or they might give us some traitor, to rule over us like Andy Johnson, or Brownlow, or Ed. Stanley. The people of the south are to be disfranchised, not allowed to vote, until they show that they are obedient and loyal subjects o...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 25 November 1863

A French dentist apologizing to a lady for several unsuccessful attempts to extract a decayed tooth, said: "The fact is, madam, it is almost impossible for any thing bad to come out of your mouth. Foreign Crops. The London Daily News says that owing to the large increase in the yield, the harvest is estimated to be worth £20,000,000 to £30,000,000 more than that of last year, and there will consequently be no necesity for the importation of large supplies of breadstuffs from abroad. The abundant crops in England, and in Europe generally, will tell upon the Yankee finances ere long, and stimulate the movement already making rapid headway towards a general smash up. The short crops in Europe the past three years necessitated the shipment of immense amounts of breadstuffs, from this side, which enabled the Yankees to pay their foreign debts, and preventexchange from ruling ruinously high against them. Cut off from this resource, and it is the only one they have, now that the cotton of ...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 25 November 1863

Beauty and Glory. She died in beauty, like a rose Blown from its parent stem; She died in beauty, like a pearl Dropped from some diadem: She died in beauty, like a lay Along a moonlit lake; She died in beauty, like the song Of birds amid the brake: She died in beauty, like the snow On flowers dissolved away: She died in beauty, like a star Lost on the brow of day. She lives in glory, like night's gems Set round the silver moon: She lives in glory, like the sun Amid the blue of June! A of Shells. Accounts from Charleston, (says the Augusta Constitutionalist, ) state that for six hours the Yankees threw shells at our batteries at the rate of twenty per minute. At this rate seven thousand two hundred shells were fired during the time specified. The cost of a single shell in the United States, we believe, is sl4. The expense of this pyrotechnic display would therefore amount to SIOO,OOO in round numbers. Individual estimates of the number of projectiles thrown since the beginning of the...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 2 December 1863

WYTIIL VILLI: DISPATCH. VOL. 111. WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. PUBLISHED SEMI-WEEKLY. D. A. ST. CLAIIt,-Proprietor, TERMS. The Dispatch is furnished to subscribers at $2.50 for sir months, $1.50 for three months, single copies, 10 ets. ADVERTISING. One sqnare( 10 linen) or less, one insertion, SI,OO. Each additional, 50 rents. Liberal deduction made to yearly or quarterly advertisers. Announcements of Candidates will he inserted for $5.00 in advance. "Come this way Father." During a short visit to the sea-shore of our State, some two years since, with a party of friends, it was proposed one bright afternoon that we should make up a party and go down to the harbor on a fishing excursion. We accordingly sturted, and after sailing about for miles, a young lady of the company declined going farther, and requested us to land her on one of the small islands in the harbor, where she proposed to stay until our return. My little boy then about four years old, prefered remaining with her. Accordingly...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 2 December 1863

still exists. The order which reigned in Warsaw when the .Russian chieftain proclaimed the subjugation' of the Polish capital, and the peace we have gained is the peace of Poland and Hungary under Russian and Austrian power—a peace to be hated alike by subjugator and subjugated. We might have had military success with Union. We might have captured cities, and restored them. Whole States might have returned to the Union, and have sent their representatives to Washington, We see none of these results now. The Administration stands at the door clubbing back every State which woulcj. re-unite with us under the Constitution. It is restoration of the old Union which the Administration dreads. It hates the old Union because with its restoration perishes forever the Administration and its party. — Freeman's Journal. WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. DEC. 2, 1863. WEDNESDAY, Extortion and Specula tlon. A cricis has been reached in this Government, which, unless prompt and efficient steps are taken by our...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 2 December 1863

Reported Surrender of llurnslde. The reports from East Tennessee, are very cheering, "if true." They state that Gen. Longstreet attacked Burnside in his outer line of defences at Knoxville, on Sunday, and drove him to his inner works at the point of the bayonet, killing and wounding large numbers of his men, and on Monday morning the attack was About to be renewed, when Burnside, finding himself surrounded on all sides, proposed negotiations for a surrender; that the former were finally agreed upon, and the "hero of Iredericksburg," and five thousand of his men, laid down their arms. As nothing of this kind has reached the War department, we are compelled to put little faith in the pretty picture that is drawn by the reliable gentleman. The Lynchburg Republican , of yester day, publishes a letter from a soldier in Longstreet's corps, written on Thursday last, giving a short account of the fight at Campbell's Station on the previous day. The enemy, he states, were badly beaten, losin...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 2 December 1863

Epistle to the Ladies. BY "W . E. M." OF GEN. LEl's ARMY. Te Southern maids and ladies fair, Of whatsoe'r degree, A moment stop —<i in. ment spare— And listen unto me. The summer's gone, the frosts have Come, The winter draweth near. And still they march to iife and drum, — Our armies?—do you hear? Give heed then to the yarn I spin, "Who says that it is coarse? At your fair feet I lay the sin, The thread of my discourse. To speak of shoes, it boots not here, Our Q. M's., wise and good, Give cotton calfskins twice a year, With soles of cottouwood. Shoeless we meet the well-shod foe, And bootless him despise ; Sockless we watch,with bleeding toe, And him sockdologize 1 Perchance our powder giveth out ? We fight them then with rocks, With hungry craws we craw-fish not, But, Miss, we miss the socks. Few arc the miseries that we lack, And comforts seldom come; What have I in my haversack? And what have you at home? Fair ladies then, if nothing loth, Bring forth your spinning w...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 9 December 1863

WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. VOL. 111. WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. PUBLISHED SEMI-WEEKLY. D. A. ST. CLAIR, Proprietor. TERMS. The Dispatch is furnished to subscribers at $2.50 for six months , $1.50 for three months, single copies, 10 cts. ADVERTISING. One square( 10 lines) or less, one insertion, SI,OO. Each additional , 50 cents. Liberal deduction made to yearly or guarterly advertisers. Announcements of Candidates will be inserted for $5.00 in advance. Fools' Pence. The following Narrative is from one of the Tracts of the London Tract Society: A little sharp-featured, meanlydressed man stood talking to Mrs. Crowder, the mistress of the gin-pal-ace in F—street: "Why, Mrs. Crowder,"said he, "I should hardly know you again. Really I must say you have things in thetirst style. What a splendid paper ! what superb cur* tains 1 what elegant ohairs? what a pair of tire-screens! all so bright and so fresh: and yonrself so well, madum, and looking so well." Mrs. Orowder had dropped languidly • into an ar...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 9 December 1863

WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. WEDNESDAY, DEC. 9, 1803. Wliat is to be the End 1 Not a day passes but this question is asked with anxious solicitude by hundreds of our people,and is answered in a variety of ways. That the people at home can long hold up under the increasing scarcity of provisions and the rapid increase of prices, is preposterous. There is scarcely a man working for a salary, who can at present, manage to support himself or family. What then can he expect to do when provisions decrease still more, and prices increase in the same ratio? It is said, and honestly believed by those who assert it, that if we feed the army, there will be no danger. This, we think is a serious error, and one which we should discard as quickly as possible. You may pile up vast store-houses of suplies for the army, feed and clothe the soldiers like Princes, and still if the dear ones at homo are left to struggle with rold and hunger, your battles will never be fought, or if fought, prove fruitless. Onc...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 9 December 1863

A. new Candidate for Con- gress. The Chattanooga Rebel publishes the subjoined card from lion. John Happy: To my fellow Soldiers and Citizens of Tennessee: At the earnest and most frantic solicitation of two frends with whom I have just taken a small drink, I have consented to allow my name to go before the public as a candidate to represent the 12th congressional district of Tennessee in the Confederate Congress. My claims of civil preferment are multitudinous, in a military point of view. I have been in every famous retreat in this war from Fishing Creek to Lavergne.— As retreating constitutes one of the cheif stragetic features of this war, I flatter myself (since nobody else does) that I am as expert in a backward movement as a doodle-bug. I have served heroically in the quartermaster's department ever since the war began—and would do it still to the close, if the authorities would abstain from court martialing mo every two weeks for mal-feasance in office. To my dear,indulgent,...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 9 December 1863

EFFECTIVE CURE FOR HOG CHOLERA.—J. W. A- Sanford furnishes t. Southern exchange the following: I desire through the medium of your colums to infofm the public that tar and grease mixed in equal proportions are a certain antidote for this prevalent and hitherto fatal disease. The mode of treatment is as simple as the remedy itself. Catch the affected animal, turn it upon its back, gag it, and drench it with a gill of the mixture. The effect is almost instantaneous. In a few hours the animal regains its appetite, and ia seen buisily engaged in quest of food. My stock minder, with whom the practice originated, says, "if you can get the tar and grease in him, you count him good for bacon." In more than twenty cases, succeded in curing every one. Ointment made of equal parts of lard, and extract of logwood is, M. P. Desmartes says, a powerful remedy for fetid odors and brings about a healthy action in sloughing and g&ngreneous wounds. COMFORT FOR GIN DRINKERS:—A medical gentl...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 16 December 1863

WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. VOL. 111. WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. PUBLISHED SEMI-WEEKLY. D. A. ST. CLAIR, Proprietor. TERMS. The Dispatch is furnished to subscribers at $2.50 far six months , $1.50 J'or three months, single copies, 10 cts. ADVERTISING. Ohe smuire( 10 lines) or less, one insertion, if 1,00. Each additional , 50 cents. Liberal deduction made to yearly or guarterly advertisers. Announcements of Candidates will be inserted for $5. 00 in advance. A Contented Life. AT THIRTY. Five hundred dollars I have saved— A rather moderate store— No matter ; I shall be content • When I've a little more. AT FORTY. Well, I can count ten thousand nowThat's better than before; And 1 may well be satisfied When I've a little more. AT FIFTY. Some fifty thousand—pretty well— But I have earned it sore; However, I shall not complain • When I've a little more. AT SIXTY, One hundred thousand—sick and old— Ah ! life is half a bore! Yet I can be content to live When I've a little more. AT SEVENTY. lie dies—and ...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 16 December 1863

WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. WEDNESDAY, DEC. 16, 1863. Are We to be Starved 1 No subject perhaps, has caused the soldiers and people of the Confederate States more uneasiness or done them more serious injury than the one of "Starvation of the South."' What has produced this feeling, wo need not now discuss, believing that every man, woman and child throughout our land is familiar with the cause. So we think the best answer to the question "are we to be starved" ? will be found in the publication of facts. The census of the Southern and Northern States for 1860 has been published in the United States. The following statements include the items most essential to living. Let them be carefully examined by all who are frightened by the idea of starvation: Number of Hogs. Free States 11,904,085 Slave States 20,052,182 The Slave States, therefore, have twice a3 many hogs as the free States, and only half as many people to eat thorn. Bushels of Indian Corn. Free States 295,513,044 Slave States 434,...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 16 December 1863

Tlie Blockade. The letter of General Wise, lately published in the "Enquirer," urging, among other remedies, the perempt- ( ory stopping of the blockade, has attracted considerable attention to this subject. The exorbitant prices obtained for every article at auction sales, has also pointed prejudice at both the blockade and the auctions. We cannot but regard these prejudices as the result of partial knowledge, which would be removed if all the facts connected with blockade running could be made known to the public. There is a saying attributed to Napoleon, very applicable to our situation and duties— "Never do what your enemy wants yon to do" — The United States are firmly convinced that by stopping the blockade our resources would be so straightened that we must speedily succumb; hence they are endeavoring to shut up the ports. Now shall we come to the assistance of the enemy, and do effectually what they have been üble to accomplish only partially? We do not pretend to deny that ...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 16 December 1863

-Wbat is Eternity. What is eternity ? Can aught Paint its duration to the thought ? Tell all the sands the ocean laves ; Tell all the changes, all its waves; Or tell with more laborious pains The drops its mighty mass contains; Be this astonishing account Augmented with the full amount Of all the drops that clouds have shed Where'er their wat'ry fleeces spread, Through all time's long protracted tour From Adam to the present hour; — Still short the sum nor can it vie With the more numerous years that lie Embosomed in ETERNITY. Attend, O man, with awe divine, For this eternity is thine. — GIBBONS. Now and Then. A young man whom I had known is a boy, came to an aged professor of a distinguished continental university, with a face beaming with delight, and informed him that the long and fondly cherished desire of his heart was at length fulfilled, his parents having given their consent to his studying the profession of the law. As the university presided over by his friend was a distin...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 23 December 1863

WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. VOL. 111. WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. PUBLISHED SEMI-WEEKLY. D. A. ST. CLAIR, Proprietor. TERMS. The Dispatch is famished to subscribers at $2.50 for six months , $1.50 for three months, single copies, 10 cts. ADVERTISING. One square( 10 lines) or less, one insertion, Si,oo. Each additional, 50 tents. Liberal deduction made to yearly or guarterly advertisers. Announcements of Candidates mill be inserted for% 5.00 in advance. Colonel S. on a Furlough, OR TIIE TAILOR PROMOTED TO A MAJOR. Col. S. was one of Virginia's bravest sons. He had followed the fortunes of the lamented "Stonewall" from the battle of Manassas, No. 1, which gave General Jackson this sobriquet, up to the battle which closed the earthly career of his beloved leader. Through all the dangers and hardships of the several campaigns, Col. S. had not only escaped with a whole skin, but had never once shown his back to the enemy, or had the misfortune to become acquainted with the interior of a Yankee bastile...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 23 December 1863

WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. WEDNESDAY, DEC. 23, 1803. Christmas. Afl this is the last issue of the before the Christmas holidays will be upon us, we deem it not altogether inappropriate to otll attention to, and make a few remarks upon the occasion. The 25th of December, by us and our immediate ancestors, is commemorated as being the anniversary of the birth of Christ, and hence the name CShrist-mas, mas or mass, denoting a Romish ceremony of dedications purification. We are credibly informed by chronologists, that the 25th of December was not the day upon which Christ was born, and hence, the celebration Of this day is altogether inappropriate. The first footsteps we find of the observance of this occasion, are in the second century, about the time of the Emperor Commodius. The decrctorial epistles, indeed, carry it up a little higher and say that Teleaphonus, who lived in the reign of Antonius Pius, ordered divine service to be celebrated, and an angelic hymn to be sung the night before ...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 23 December 1863

ones who will remain the legacy of the war when the war shall be over? Forgive us for having outraged even the sensibilities of Europe by his attempt to excite servile revolt? For- . give us for his Beast BUTLERS, and for the thousand atrocities which he has let loose against us? He may forgive us for these his crimes; but so long as we have hearts to feel and hands to strike, we shall never forgive him! How impudent it is to come, with our brothers' blood upon his accursed hands, and ask us to accept his forgiveness! But he goes farther. He makes his forgiveness depend upon terms. We have only to swear obedience to his will. We have to swear that the proclamation of emancipation which he issued last year, and which we received with mocking, and which has since been a general derision, shall be submitted to by us. Our society is to be upturned. Instead of that distinction between the races necessary for tho happiness of both, he asks us to swear that we will have none at all, until ...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 23 December 1863

PATRIOTISM OF SOUTHERN WOMUN. — The cheek glows and the heart swells with honest pride at the recital of the noble acts of sublime heroism and self-sacrifice displayed by our bonny Southern girls, llarken to the story of their worth as recited by one of their most intense enemies The writer is an army correspondent of the Chicago Journal, who confesses that his mean little soul shrunk beneath their withering look of hatred and pride. God bless'em. I shall never be done admiring the patriotic faith and undying; devotion of the loyal women ot the land, but I must tell you that the rebel women of the South are worthy in everything but a sacred cause of their Northern sisters. There is nothing they will not surrender wi th a smile; the gemmed ring, the dia--111. i d bracelet, the rich wadrobe.— T y cut up the rich carpets for soldiers' blankets without a sigh; they take the fine linnen from their persons for bandages. When 400 of Longstreet's men came up to Nashville, prisoners of war, ...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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