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Elephind.com contains 5,693 items from Virginia Farm Bureau News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 March 1942

March 15, 1942 News of The Associated Women Army Meals May Affect Diet Of Nation After War Is Over When Johnny comes marching home again, after his present Army days are over, he is likely to have some ideas that may completely upset his mother's pantry. He and a million or so are going to have some new notions about what's good to eat —some new tastes that will have been acquired in the service. And these new notions, according to Col. R. A. Osmun of the Quartermaster Corps, are going to add up to a demand which will open new opportunities for farmers' cooperative marketing associations. The demand will start, Colonel Osmun predicts, right at the family breakfast, dinner, and supper table. It will be a demand for milk and for dairy products. It will be a hungry plea for fresh fruits and vegetables. It will be a persistent insistence on the type of diet that dietetic experts call "correct eating" and that an educated palate senses as "a swell meal." Correct Feeding "The United State...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 March 1942

4 Newi al the UNITED WOOL GROWERS ASSOCIATION "Qood Wool feuildLi Qocd 'Will" JOHN H. EAST, President WILL H. MOORE, Vice-President W. L. KIRBY, Secretary-Treasurer K. A. KEITHLY, General Manager Churchville, Va. Lexington, Va. Richmond, Va. Harrisonburg, Va. C.J. 's Market Letter From The Wool Clip No progress has been made in the way of taking over or purchasing the domestic wool clip. We are still operating under the frozen prices which prevailed during the period from October 1 to December 6. The freedom with which growers are now offering to contract the 1942 clip takes all the steam out of our attempt to establish higher prices. In the majority of cases it is our opinion that the contracts now being made on the sheep's back are sold below the value that will finally be set as a permanent ceiling. The natural conclusion, as a result of widespread contracting on the sheep's back, is that the growers are perfectly satisfied with prevailing prices. It might be well to outline the ...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 March 1942

March 15, 1942 Importance Of Wool In War Stressed By Paul Swaffar (Below is the text of an address delivered by Paul Swaffar, Assistant Animal Husbandman at V.P.1., before the annual meeting of the United IVool Growers' Association in Roanoke on February 3. The title of Mr. Swaffar's talk was "Remember Pearl Harbor— We Will Win With Wool.") "The title of this talk suggests a patriotic outburst. It will not, however, be that. In the first place, no group I can think of needs loyalty and patriotism preached to them less than a gang of farmers, particularly sheepmen and wool growers. In the second place, I couldn't make a patriotic speech if I wanted to. To me, and I imagine to most of you, patriotism boils down to the very simple fact that we like to live in a country where we can grow wool if we want to — or quit. We can sell our wool to a dealer who makes 5 cents a pound if we want to, or we can pool it and keep the nickel ourselves. We can gripe about the way the Government is run ...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 March 1942

6 Swaffar (Continued from Page Five) tically the same conditions exist. These countries were able to develop because wool is a non-per-ishable product, can be transported long distances, and human beings everywhere demanded wool to keep them warm. Our own great western range country, with its glowing history, was built and developed—agriculturally at least — by the sheep's ability to live and prosper on land unfit for anything else. Outcome of Wars Wool has also been important, I believe, in determining the outcome of wars and certain battles. Take Napoleon again. History records that Napoleon was defeated at Waterloo, but reading the record of Russian invasion in 1812— with the bitter cold of the early Russian winter, and without ample protection for his soldiers —this invasion, according to many commentators, was responsible for the beginning of the end. Napoleon marched into Russia proudly in June of that year with an Army of 650.000 men who had not tasted defeat. The sturdy Russ...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 March 1942

March 15, 1942 Drive (Continued from Page One) snow and the death of a prominent citizen. These 16 voted to organize and made plans to hold another general meeting so that the policies and program of the Virginia Farm Bureau might be outlined before more people. They stressed the value of a good preparation and said they all felt certain that Tazewell would give a good account of itself if a few minor difficulties could be smoothed out. Montgomery—About 30 attended the general meeting held on February 25, despite continuing bad weather. About two-thirds of those present voted to organize, one voted against, and the others were neutral. A committee of 27 was selected to solicit members. A minimum goal of 50 was set, but those present said they didn't believe they would have any difficulty in signing up 100 members. Floyd—A general meeting was held on February 26 with about 40 persons present. It was decided to organize and 26 of those present agreed to canvass their respective commun...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 March 1942

8 Classified Advertising Rates The classified advertising section of the Virginia Farm Bureau News is maintained as a service for all readers of The News. Through this inexpensive method they can reach the cream of Virginia's farm market—over 10,500 progressive members of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation and the United Wool Growers Association. If you wish to sell, buy or trade with Virginia farmers, you can get results through the Virginia Farm Bureau News. Rates are: 4 cents per word for one insertion; 3 cents per word for each insertion where three or more insertions are ordered. Minimum charge is 50 cents. Cash must accompany orders. Do Your Part in our Fight for Freedom and Liberty. Grow all f»ADnCLI ooc * possible. GARDEN Plan now to plant Fruits for your Victory Garden this nUm for s P nn £ sure - Write for free Catalogue and Planting Guide, listing Dependable Fruit and Nut 7 rees, Small Fruits, Berry Plants, Ornamentals, and General Nursery Stock. Cumberland Valley Nurser...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 April 1942

Virginia Farmera Are Entitled To Parity Vol. II No. 4 VFBF Promises Long Hours, Full Granaries O'Neal Hits Farm Critics In Va. Talk Addressing the annual convention of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation in Richmond, March 20, President Edward A. O'Neal of the American Farm Bureau Federation assailed those who have been accusing the farmers of attempted "profiteering" because of their efforts to raise prices of wheat and corn to parity levels. "Parity price is only the price to which farmers are justly entitled," said Mr. O'Neal, "and it represents only a fair-exchange value on farm products when traded for the goods and services produced by other groups. For nearly 10 yeajs, the present national administration has sponsored a farm program designed to raise prices to parity levels, and now the cry is raised that parity for farmers will bring on inflation. "The farmers were the only group who were ready for this war. They had piled up huge surpluses of food and fiber against the day ...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 April 1942

2 The Virginia Farm Bureau News "Equality for Agriculture" la published monthly by The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, Inc., at Richmond, Virginia. Subscription 50c per year, included in membership dues. Entered as see-ond-class matter February 17, 1941, at the post office at Richmond, Virginia, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Editorial and Business Offices, 208 Broad-Grace Arcade Building, Richmond, Virginia. Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Officers G. F. Holsinger, president - .... Harrisonburg, Va. C. L. Weast, vice-president Grottoes, Va. M. B. Heizer, secretary Harrisonburg, Va. C. V. Smith, treasurer.. ... ..Harrisonburg, Va. Cleta Jo Liskey, office secretary Harrisonburg, Va. Jean Meredith, acting director of information, 208 Broad-Grace Arcade Building. Richmond. V* T. E. Starnes, organization director - Pearisburg, Va. Directory County Farm Bureau Presidents Accomack—Lawrence H. Kilmon, Onancock, Va. Amelia—Charles Moyer, Mattoax, Va. Augusta—C. L. Weast, Grottoes, Va. Bru...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 April 1942

April IS, 1942 News of The Associated Women Associated Women To Hold Public Speaking Contests "The World We Want After The War" has been selected as the subject of the nation-wide Public Speaking Contest for members of the Associated Women of the American Farm Bureau Federation. Any farm woman who is a member of the Associated Women of the AFBF can compete in the contest in her own state. It has been recommended that the states hold a contest during the year. Following are other rules for the contest: Previous winners in a regional or a national contest will be barred; Regional contests will be held in each of the four regions; two or more persons may collaborate on the subject matter and the paper presented by one designated to do so; to facilitate scoring, manuscripts must be submitted to the Regional Director prior to the contest; subject material must be original with the exception of illustrations and quotations; the oration must be committed, and delivered without the aid of n...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 April 1942

2 The Virginia Farm Bureau News "Equality for Agriculture" la published monthly by The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, Inc., at Richmond, Virginia. Subscription 50c per year, included in membership dues. Entered as sec-ond-class matter February 17, 1941, at the post office at Richmond, Virginia, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Hid ito rial and Business Offices. 208 Broad-Grace Arcade Building, Richmond, Virginia. Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Officers G. F. Holsinger, president Harrisonburg, Va. C. L. Weast, vice-president Grottoes, Va. M. B. Heizer, secretary Harrisonburg, Va. C. V. Smith, treasurer Harrisonburg, Va. Cleta Jo Liskey, office secretary Harrisonburg, Va. Jean Meredith, acting director of information, 208 Broad-Grace Arcade Building. Richmond. V* T. E. Starnes, organization director - Pearisburg, Va. Directory County Farm Bureau Presidents Accomack—Lawrence H. Kilmon, Onancock, Va. Amelia —Charles Moyer, Mattoax, Va. Augusta—C. L. Weast, Grottoes, Va. Brunswick—O. S...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 April 1942

April 15, 1942 News of The Associated Women Associated Women To Hold Public Speaking Contests "The World We Want After The War" has been selected as the subject of the nation-wide Public Speaking Contest for members of the Associated Women of the American Farm Bureau Federation. Any farm woman who is a member of the Associated Women of the AFBF can compete in the contest in her own state. It has been recommended that the states hold a contest during the year. Following are other rules for the contest: Previous winners in a regional or a national contest will be barred; Regional contests will be held in each of the four regions; two or more persons may collaborate on the subject matter and the paper presented by one designated to do so; to facilitate scoring, manuscripts must be submitted to the Regional Director prior to the contest; subject material must be original with the exception of illustrations and quotations; the oration must be committed, and delivered without the aid of n...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 April 1942

4 oi the UNITED WOOL GROWERS ASSOCIATION IdJoot Qu&ldti Qood Will" JOHN H. EAST, President WILL H. MOORE, Vice-President W. L. KIRBY, Secretary-Treasurer K. A. KEITHLY, General Manager Churchville, Va. Lexington, Va. Richmond, Va. Harrisonburg, Va. C.J, ? s Market Letter The Government order to which we referred in our last letter proved to be much larger than anyone anticipated. The QMG's Office has asked for bids for some 74 million yards of woolen and worsteds which, if we figure correctly, will be the equivalent of about 42,000 miles of material, or putting it another way, sufficient cloth to blanket an area 11 rods wide extending from Chicago to Boston. No order approaching this volume has ever been made before. In addition thereto, orders are forthcoming for 10 million pairs of socks. To analyze the blanket order alone: These blankets will weigh slightly less than 5 pounds each. If the wool shrinks 50 per cent in scouring, it will require about 10 pounds of grease ...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 April 1942

April 15, 1942 Important Resolutions Are Adopted By V.F.B.F. Action Taken In Richmond Following are the resolutions which were adopted at the annual convention of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation in Richmond, along with one which will be referred to the Executive Committee of the AFBF: I. Our Obligation to The Nation Our farmers love freedom and peace. A just economy to which our farmers are devoted is conducive to peace and a requisite of freedom. But our nation is at war. We have been attacked. We yield ourselves to the emergency demands to make our nation strong. The nation will not call upon our farmers in vain. They will deliver. In combat, they can be relied upon. In production of materials, they pledge no strikes, no effort at profiteering, but long hours, full granaries, that freedom and democracy may live. We call upon industry and labor to give to the nation a similar pledge, to mobolize their full force to the end that all units of industry, both large and small, contr...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 April 1942

6 1 . J?Mg IBPfl *JM^Pt' flw (1 ' uJfe Wm l~ : \ - •., SJI 11 \ Jfl HJbr ' ; JBBB ffifc fflßffim;' jH|*£ jSHII WMS|^HBplWKmmsSm % '■ ■ iV if F'»® I*- • 'f i^W' WwM ! j# iM^MiiIiKMWIBWWII^ I"^^^1"^^^ MSiiy . J jJm " « %,. %^|t ■ i. - i 3 m it ; ..■■•/ .tm C . . J* *"". T M . p . I 40*» N ■ ..»'-* • «* v-■ >m J1 . Pictured on the left is Edward A. O'Neal, President of the American Farm Bureau Federation, at the annual banquet of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation held at the ' Richmond Hotel in Richmond. Beside him is G. F. Holsinger, President of the VFBF. Efficiency (Continued from Page Four) range from $3 to $5. Even with present prices of 12 cents per board foot, the cost should not be more than $4 in the usual type of plant. Refrigeration is the third major investment item and probably first in the order of importance. In the large plants of 350-locker capacity or more, refrigeration investment usually is equal to or up to 25 per cent more than insulation costs. In un...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 April 1942

April IS, 1942 Starnes Gives Field Report Following is a report, by counties, of meetings conducted within the past month by T. E. Starnes, Organization Director for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. Giles —A meeting of the Membership Committee was held on March 10. Up to this date 20 members had been signed up. With three community meetings, one on March 14, and the other two on the 16th and 17th, we had 40 members signed up at that time. Membership Committee members agreed to work during their spare time to secure additional members and the date set for organization was April 11th. Pulaski—A meeting was conducted with the Membership Committees on March 9. Too much snow and bad roads prevented many from attending. At that time 20 members had signed up. No organization date was set because of a movement on hand to consolidate the two cooperative stores in Pulaski. Much progress has been accomplished along this line. When this becomes a reality, Pulaski can be counted upon for a g...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 April 1942

8 Holsinger (Continued from Page Seven) drop of billion dollars in national income. At that time, a6O per cent drop in farm prices was accompanied with a drop of national income from 80 billion dollars to 40 billion dollars. Loss In Virginia In Virginia, the drop of 5 per cent represents a loss of 8 to 10 million dollars annually to Virginia farmers. Twenty-five per cent below parity, which we had as late as two years ago, represents a 40 million dollars loss to Virginia farmers, and between $200 and $300 per farm family. If these findings are correct, and they are generally accepted as such, and we have found the means by which we can prevent a recurrence of these great and unfortunate losses if we will but use the means known to us and at our command, if our farmers know them they will surely respond by uniting their strength to the Farm Bureau effort to permanently correct them. We have found also by experience that we can substantially cut the cost of distribution of supplies ea...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 April 1942

April 15, 1942 O'Neal (Continued from Page One) this year were about 20 per cent higher than in 1929, while retail food prices were actually 10 per cent lower than in 1929. The trouble with consumers is that the farmer fed them at depression prices for so long that they came to consider low food prices as normal. Many couples who have been keeping house only since the beginning of the depression in 1929 have never, until very recently, had to pay for food as much as it should be worth. For much of the depression period, the farmers fed the consumers at bankruptcy prices. They forget that the farmer did not get his fair share of the national income for more than 20 years preceding the outbreak of the war. Now that the farmer is beginning to get his fair share, consumers are complaining, but they have no just cause for camplaint." Mr. O'Neal said that the farmers are the only group in America that voluntarily limits his demands to a fair-exchange level. "Labor," he said, "asks an arbi...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 April 1942

10 Classified Advertising Rates The classified advertising section of the Virginia Farm Bureau News is maintained as a service for all readers of The News. Through this inexpensive method they can reach the cream of Virginia's farm market—over 10,500 progressive members of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation and the United Wool Growers Association. If you wish to sell, buy or trade with Virginia farmers, you can get results through the Virginia Farm Bureau News. Rates are: 4 cents per word for one insertion; 3 cents per word for each insertion where three or more insertions are ordered. Minimum charge is 50 cents. Cash must accompany orders. DO YOUR PART IN OUR FIGHT FOR FREEDOM AND LIBERTY. Grow all CADRCftI the food possible. uAnUtN Plan now to plant Fruits for your Victory Garden this rJGm mt Spring sure. Write 'WVICTORY for free eclogue ' T and Planting Guide, listing Dependable Fruit and Nut Trees, Small Fruits, Berry Plants, Ornamentals, and General Nursery Stock. Cumberland V...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 May 1942

Virginia Farmers Are Entitled To' Parity Vol. 11, No. 5 Giles, Montgomery, Tazewell Organize Commissioner Walker Stresses Value Of Cooperation In War By L. M. Walker, Jr. Commissioner of Agriculture Some of the major problems facing farmers during this time of emergency are discussed in the following article written by L. M. Walker, Jr., Virginia Commissioner of Agriculture, especially for The Virginia Farm Bureau News and entitled "Cooperation As An Aid To Victory Cooperation between farmers in time of war takes on an even more important aspect than it assumed in normal times. The usual problems with which we have to contend are aggravated by the emergency, as new ones present themselves. Many of these both old and new cannot be solved satisfactorily by the efforts of each individual farm working separately. In wisdom there is strength and the result of constructive thinking by all the residents of a given farm neighborhood is wisdom. It is now more essential than ever that neighbo...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Virginia Farm Bureau News — 15 May 1942

2 The Virginia Farm Bureau News "Equality for Agriculture" Is published monthly by The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, Inc., at Richmond, Virginia. Subscription 60c per year, included in membership duet. Entered as sec-ond-class matter February 17, 1941, at the post office at Richmond, Virginia, under the Act of March 8, 1879. Editorial and Business Offices, 208 Broad-Orace Arcade Building, Richmond, Virginia. Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Officers G. F. Holsinger, president Harrisonburg, Va. C. L. Weast, vice-president Grottoes, Va. M. B. Heizer, secretary Harrisonburg, Va. C. V. Smith, treasurer Harrisonburg, Va. Cleta Jo Liskey, office secretary Harrisonburg, Va. Jean Meredith, acting director of information, 208 Broad-Grace Arcade Building. Richmond, Va. T. E. Starnes, organization director Pearisburg, Va. Directory County Farm Bureau Presidents Accomack—Lawrence H. Kilmon, Onancock, Va. Amelia —Charles Moyer, Mattoax, Va. Augusta—C. L. Weast, Grottoes, Va. Brunswick—O. S. Wi...

Publication Title: Virginia Farm Bureau News, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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