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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1987

,! ldl ■ llfli if lEfB -'.v j^l Vol. 46, No. 7 F~ nr —»» ■> „, !M||^MB»iMnMMP l l < » & 3H| Despite her hectic schedule, Hope Reynolds, the reigning Miss Virginia Farm Bureau, still has time to relax at home on the farm. (Photo by Randy Shavis) Miss Reynolds' education is more than just college By RANDY SHAVIS VFB Communications Specialist ABlNGDON—Webster's Dictionary defines the word extraordinary as someone or something exceptional or notably unusual. Webster must have had Hope Reynolds in mind when he defined the adjective, for Miss Virginia Farm Bureau 1987 is a living example of the term. She possesses exceptional intelligence, personality, and talent. And she's notably unusual because she hasn't followed the stereotypical farm girl progression. That doesn't mean the 19-year-old Washington County native lacks any quality traits usually associated with the integrity of farm life. Quite the contrary. She still possesses that inherent love of the...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1987

2 s B^^ji Young Farmers explore values of Constitution Two hundred years ago, Virginia farmers and statesman were among the 55 men to meet in Philadelphia to draft a new document—the Constitution of the United States of America. The Constitution has protected the citizens and has been an example to the world. Two-thirds of the world's constitutions have been adopted since 1970. Only 15 pre-date World War II but none predates ours. Our Constitution is the oldest and is still as relevant today as it was in Thomas Jefferson's time. Last year, we celebrated the centennial of the Statue of Liberty, a symbol of freedom and welcome to millions of immigrants around the world. The reasons those immigrants, our forefathers, came to America were the concepts of freedom and justice spelled out in our Constitution. This year, young farmers participating in the Farm Bureau Discussion Meet will discuss the topic, "How do the freedoms of today's agriculture compare with the freedoms that the foundi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1987

August, 1987 College officials defend land swap Leaders hear Tech's story (Editor's note: Norm Hyde is the Virginia Farm Bureau's broadcast editor and works in cooperation with the Virginia News Network covering agricultural issues. His reports can be heard daily on 26 VNN radio stations across the Old Dominion.) By NORM HYDE VFB Broadcast Editor BLACKSBURG—Virginia Tech officials are hoping the controversy over their recent land swap for the school of agriculture will die down, now that the state's farm leaders have had a full explanation of the circumstances behind it. Judging by two prominent state lawmaker's opinions, they may have succeeded. Augusta County Sen. Frank Nolen said he forsees no backlash from the General Assembly come this winter, although he still wishes something other than a land swap could have been arranged. "What was done was done in good faith," Nolen said while attending the annual Agri-Tech celebration in Blacksburg in July, "according to state procedures ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1987

4 Longest recipient of YL Award ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH-The Virginia Soybean Association's Young Leader believes more research must be done to find new markets for soybeans. George M. Longest Jr. said experiments have been done with other commodities, such as corn, to develop its marketability but soybeans have been ignored. "I think we need to do everything we can to find new uses for soybeans," he said. Longest noted Essex County farmers have already taken a step in that direction by growing Vance soybeans, a small variety of beans used as a snack food in Japan. "I have no idea what kind of market this could develop into," he said. "That's just one of the things that has potential." It is this kind of thinking that won Longest the ASA/Lexone Young Leader in Virginia Award co-sponsored by the American Soybean Association and E.I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co. Longest and his wife, Gwen, have taken a trip to St. Louis for the 1987 Soybean EXPO. In addition, the couple will take ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1987

August, 1987 USD A cracks down on chemical usage RlCHMOND—Virginia's tobacco farmers face tough new inspection procedures and stiff fines if caught using illegal chemicals on their crop this year. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is cracking down on the use of herbicides, like Dicamba, at the request of the tobacco industry. The action follows a cigarette scandal this spring, where 160 million cigarettes manufactured by the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. were recalled from Japan because of Dicamba contamination. Under the new rules, growers must certify to the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service that they have not used any banned chemicals on their crop. The penalty for lying, failing a crop test or refusing to provide a sample is the loss of price support. In addition, you could be fined $10,000 or be sentenced to five years in prison or both. The government also pledges to intensify its testing of tobacco samples taken from the warehouse floor and to begin using more ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1987

6 What do you get for $2.50 a month? RICHMOND—What can you get for $2.50 a month or $30 a year? A newspaper subscription, tickets to Busch Gardens or a nice dinner out. What if somebody told you with $2.50 a month or $30 a year you could have access to travel programs, a pharmaceutical mail order service, several products for your home as well as the farm, several types of insurance, commodity activities, a legal fund and a newspaper subscription in addition to other literature promoting Virginia Farm Bureau activities? You'd probably say that Farm Bureau is just for farmers. That's not the case anymore. Country doctor image changing to meet needs IVOR—The image of the country doctor is changing. While he still treats several generations in one family, the physician practicing in rural areas has expanded his services to meet the needs of his patients. He also no longer works out of his own home; in many cases, he operates a community health center (CHC). According to John Cafazza Jr...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1987

August, 1987 (Editor's note: Confronting The Issues is run annually in Farm Bureau News as a way of informing members of the political concerns of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. This year Confronting The Issues focuses on interjurisdictional water transfer, land use and agriculture education programs at Virginia Tech. This column is published in conjunction with Farm Bureau s statewide policy development hearings.) Water Transfer The Problem Conflict associated with proposals to transfer water across local political boundaries has been a major water management issue in Virginia in recent years. The pressure for such transfers continues with agricultural and rural interests acting as the "exporter". The transfer process is currently characterized by a lack of information, excessive conflict and high cost. In the absence of an efficient and equitable system for facilitating interjurisdictional water transfers the agricultural community may experience undervaluation of their wate...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1987

8 Quality is hallmark of Safemark brand RICHMOND—The Virginia Farm Bureau's Products Division is the organization's best kept secret. According to Manager Ron Diamond, "Many Farm Bureau members are not aware of the complete line of products available to them. It is difficult for us to communicate with almost 100,000 families. Our message is being told mainly by word of mouth." Farm Bureau members have praised the Products Division for the quality and price of its merchandise. A member of the state board of directors had this to say about Safemark products: "We try to use Safemark products as much as possible because we know that quality is first with these products," said R. Samuel Coleman of Prince Edward County. "I have found my membership is free because of the savings I get by using Safemark." The Products Division has something for everyone, including chisel teeth, cutting parts for hay equipment and combines, roller chains, grease and oils, filters and baler twine. The entire ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1987

August, 1987 Blueberry operation more than just a farm By PENNA PLYMIRE VFB News Editor (Editor's note: This is the first in a series on diversification. This series will look at the various steps farmers across the state have taken to supplement their incomes.) CARMEL CHURCH—BiII Harwood, owner and operator of Virginia Berry Farm, just loves to talk about "Raising Blue Fruit for Long Green." This is the name of Harwood's marketing plan for developing a successful blueberry plantation. 'The most important thing is location," he said. "You must be in a location which is easily accessible to at least 50,000 people." The Caroline County Farm Bureau member was very particular in choosing his location which is close to U.S. Route 1 and Interstate 95. He caters to both the Richmond and Washington areas. "We're within 100 miles of 10 million Diversification people," he said The second factor in raising blueberries is having "the financial and human resources to produce the crop." "This inc...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1987

10 Woman ag agent likes uniqueness KING GEORGE—There is one woman agent in King George's extension office and she is not a home economist. Anne Edwards serves as the agricultural extension agent for the county. She is one of the two female ag agents out of 356 extension agents in the state. Mrs. Edwards said being one of these women in Virginia serving in this capacity makes her feel she's "one of the first to try something new. "I enjoy being unique," she said. "It's nice to have people notice and see that there aren't very many women doing this." Mrs. Edwards began working in King George County in July 1984, replacing Gary Hornbaker, now an extension agent in Loudoun County. She admits she was anxious when she started the job. "I didn't know what to expect," she said. "I had been told by various people that it would be hard. I didn't expect problems. I always expect the best of people." She believes her attitude made all the difference in dealing with people. "I wasn't coming out ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1987

August, 1987 Checks sold through Farm Bureau I recently attended the Associated Country Women of the World Council Meeting in London, England. I was accompanied by Berta White of Mississippi, American Farm Bureau Federation women's chairman; Martha Clark of Maryland, Country Women's Council chairman; and Melba Mcintosh of Louisiana, CWC chairman. CWC is the liaison organization which brings together all the organizations in the United States that belong to ACWW. Pennies for Friendship, which Farm Bureau women will be collecting during county annual meetings, help fund ACWW and its projects such as the Nutrition Education Program. ACWW promotes friendship and education for farm and rural women in over 60 countries worldwide. The U.S. will be host to the 1989 ACWW Triennial Conference in Kansas City. Checks Direct In this issue is a form to order your checks direct. It is not necessary to order checks from your banks. By ordering direct, you may save money and you will be helping to d...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1987

12 August is time for picnic safety Eleanor Whinnery Media Specialist A Taste of VIRGINIA (Editor's note: Eleanor Whinnery is a media specialist with the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.) Laughing children, barbecued chicken and outdoor fun...summer's a great time for picnics. Summer picnics are more than just a meal. They are festive occasions at which each person contributes food to a common table. Picnics are a great break from the normal routine of meal preparation during the summer. If we could throw a refrigerator under one arm and take it with us, there would be no problem in caring for food. Since that's not an alternative, follow these two steps for basic food safety and avoid the harmful bacteria that can grow quickly in warm weather. (1) Get groceries out of the car and the perishables into your refrigerator as quickly as you can. Raw meat or poultry you can't use in one to two days should be frozen at 0 degrees. (2) In food preparation, start wit...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1987

August, 1987 Miss Farm Bureau is no ordinary girl Continued from Page 1 All have been great experiences. "I was so naive," she admits. "With all these opportunities to meet and speak to people, I've become more confident and competent at my public speaking. Traveling is a great opportunity too, and in those travels, meeting people, well, you never know how they will affect your later life." Her biggest thrill was attending the 1987 American Farm Bureau Convention in Anaheim, Calif, last January where she quickly became initiated with Farm Bureau. "It was my first time out west," she says. "The weather was amazing for January, and I never realized how imporant American Farm Bureau was until I got to see the big production. "I really enjoyed (keynote speaker) Paul Harvey, (former ambassador to Mexico) John Gavin and (AFBF women's chairman) Berta White—she's dynamic! "I got to waltz with (AFBF) president (Dean) Kleckner and (VFBF president) Robert Delano. I met with the other queens an...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1987

14 j|jj |^K^VOUNCiMP^II f Airalr' FB winners Donnie Moore (right) congratulates Scott Lilly of Hanover County, the 1987-88 Virginia FFA president during the reception for State Farmer Degree recipients. This is the fifth year the State Young Farmer Committee has sponsored the reception. (Photo by Linda Trader) ■ , Jlfc 1 v * s jPPy | Mark Landmark, (right) AFBF Young Farmer and Rancher Director, congratulates and presents the plaque to Chellie Hyre of Winchester on winning the FFA Extemporaneous Speaking Contest at the State FFA Convention at Virginia Tech. The AFBF sponsors the Extemporeanous Speaking Contest nationally. (Photo by Linda Trader) FARM BUREAU SUMMER SAVINGS FARM BUREAU MEMBERS ONLY Jljfcs PASSENGER TIRES BATTERIES •Steel Belted Radials Farm ' Automot'we • All Season Tread Safemark has same manu- For WtWBE/J • Road Hazard Warranty facture as original equip- 1 As Low • Farm Bureau Quality ment for \ •John Deere $29.95 •Case T - •Ford Compare cold cranking power to any e...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1987

August, 1987 GRAPES. Concord, hybrids, PYO August, September. Ward Kipps, Rochelle, VA 703-948-4171 For Sale: English boxwoods, phone 804-745-2855 Someone out there wants to change your lonely life. Send your age so we can send free picture of a club member in your own age level. Free details, Shann Dels Romance Club, Box 1059, Whitesburg KY 41858 Sewer and drain cleaning. Any size pipe and any blockage. We specialize in large drain pipe cleaning serving all Virginia. Call for estimate - Fredericksburg 703-371-7788 NEED COLLEGE MONEY? BILLIONS AVAILABLE NOWI SCHOLARSHIPS, GRANTS, LOANS. Guarantee you qualify for 5 financial sources! Most applying receive over 20! $3 for brochure, instructions, short questionnaire. (REFUNDABLE) Nationwide Scholarship Finders, Box 2257, Lynchburg VA 24501 -0257 CARPET CLEANING, PAINTING, WINDOW WASHING, RENOVATIONS, SOUTHSIDE VIRGINIA, "LEISURE TIME," VICTORIA; 804-696-3753 Saw & Tool sharpening Service, on U.S. 1 South of Petersburg. H.C....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1987

VOL. 46, NO. 8 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA'S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS August, 1987 — The Church Guardian ' flf \> v I Virginia Farm Bureau has developed an in- You will find this package insurance prosurance program specifically designed to pro- gram for churches gives a much broader vide churches with the coverages they need to coverage with a considerable premium fully protect themselves. The Church Guardian reduction. program provides either Named Peril or All Call your county insurance advisor soon for Risk coverage on buildings and contents, plus more information on this new program offered needed liability coverages. Optional coverages by Virginia Farm Bureau Insurance Company, include: stained glass, plate glass, church theft, outdoor signs and many others. Another Blue-Ribbon Service from the down-to-earth people at Virginia Farm Bureau Insurance. Virginia Farm Bureau Insurance Services The down to earth people. P.O. Box 27552 f Richmond, Va. 23261 Telephone: (804) 788-12...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1987

T? > -*D ' ' rarm Bureau ——1 Vol. 46, No. 8 Drought *87: Prolonged dryness withers crops By PENNA PLYMIRE VFB News Editor RICHMOND—The drought of 1987 is fast approaching the disaster stage caused by the same prolonged dry conditions only a year earlier, according to the Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service. While it is still a bit early to attach a dollar figure on the losses, many of the state's staple crops, such as corn and soybeans, are under extreme stress. And the excessive heat experienced this summer makes matters even worse, lowering moisture levels more rapidly and literally baking the crops in the fields. Scattered showers have brought only short-term relief in just a few areas. Topsoil moisture as of August 25 was rated short across 95 percent of Virginia's crop land. Corn conditions were poor throughout the state except in the extreme southwest. Soybean conditions remained poor as well, with growth still slow, the VASS reported. Farmers were spraying for...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1987

2 Family practice program is great success story Most urban residents fail to recognize the inadequacy of medical facilities in rural areas of the state. Rural Virginians saw this crisis beginning to emerge 20 to 25 years ago. Young people going into the medical profession were tending to specialize and locate in urban areas, leaving rural people to travel to urban centers for medical care. The general practitioner nearly ceased to exist in Virginia. As older doctors retired, it was extremely difficult or in some cases impossible to secure doctors to locate in rural communities. The Virginia General Assembly with the guidance and prodding of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation and the Virginia Academy of Family Medicine proceeded to establish at each of our medical schools a Department of Family Practice, coupled with a scholarship program of encouragement for worthy students. The change of philosophy at the medical schools was not necessarily ac- Is the farm crisis over? It depends...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1987

September, 1987 FB extinguishing potential hazards By PENNA PLYMIRE VFB News Editor ROCKY MOUNT-When George Thomas Amos fastened the fire extinguisher to his combine, he probably thought he was taking a precaution. What that fire extinguisher turned out to be was a lifesaver. The Franklin County Farm Bureau member had been issued a fire extinguisher to place on his Massey Ferguson combine in the fall of 1986. Amos said he did not expect the event that occurred June 15 but he was prepared. "I was alone working when I looked into my rearview window and the rear of my combine was in flames; approximately 100 feet back, fire had ignited in the field," he began. Amos said he caught the blaze "just in Farm safety is no accident RICHMOND—Farming is still the nation 's most hazardous occupation," says Norman C. Wilkinson, safety specialist for the Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Co. Between 1977 and 1986, 122 Farm Bureau members died from farm-related accidents in Virginia. But Virgin...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1987

4 Suffolk man receives conservation award WASHINGTON—A Suffolk man has received recognition in the sth annual National Soil and Water Conservation Awards Program. Edward L. Felton was chosen by committees of public and private agricultural organizations in Virginia. Sponsored by E.I. du Pont Nemours Co. of Wilmington, Del., the program awards farmers and ranchers who go the extra mile in protecting the land and caring for its natural resources. The National Endowment for Soil and Water Conservation administers the program. "Voluntary and cost effective action by people who own and manage the land reduces many natural resource problems, " said Emmett Barker, president of the Farm and Industrial Equipment Institute, who chairs the endowment. "These award winners are proving it every day. "The endowment seeks to help many more Americans understand what these remarkable farm and ranch families accomplish to deserve to be recognized and honored for their contribution to our nation's reso...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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