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Title: Imperial Valley Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 34,516 items from Imperial Valley Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Harmony Regardless of Expense. [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

Harmony Regardless of Expense. "Beg pardon," said the postal clerk who bad sold her the stamps, "but you don't hare to put a 5 cent stamp on a letter for Canndn.". "1 know." said slu\ ,"but the shade Just matches my <-Hvi'lope. you kuow." — Philadelphia I'ri'ns. Garfield Tea, the medicine that purifies the blood and cleanses the system, brings good health to all who use it. It is made from herbs. Druggists sell it. TO CURE A COLD IN ONE DAT Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets. All druggists refund the money if It falls to cure. K. W. Grove's signature is on each box. 26c. Wife — Whats funny in that letter you are reading? Husband — It's from Bobson. He asks if I don't want to pay him that $10 I 3we him. — Smart Set.

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HIS FIRST RECOGNITION. [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

HIS FIRST RECOGNITION. fb« TarnlßS Point la the Career *ff Nathaniel Hawthorne. The first reading of "The Scarlet Letter" has been told In T. W. Hlgrlnson's book of essays, "Contemporaries." The reafllng was given to the author's dearest critic, his wife. During the entire winter wben be was at work upon the book be seemed oppressed by some secret anxiety. "There was a knot in bis forehead 111 the time," said Mrs. Hawthorne. Finally one evening be went to her and said that he bad written something which be would like to read aloud. The work amounted to very little, but | still he would like to read it. All that evening be read, but as the romance was unfinished at bedtime bis wife made no comments, knowing that be disliked criticism until one bad heard the whole. The next night he read again, and now her suspense grew so unendurable that in the midst of a moving scene she sank from her low stool to the floor, pressed her hands to her ears and declared that sho could not bear to hear...

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Fooled Bfa Doctor. [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

Fooled Bfa Doctor. The Sate Rev. H. R. Haweis, wfto was squally nctab'.e as preacher, jour nalist, lecturer and musician, suffered from a dangerous hip disease when a boy of 0. The celebrated Sir Benjamin Brodie, who was asked if a change of scene would benefit the afflicted youth, answered, "Take him anywhere —it does not matter." Haweis lived to laugh at his doctor, and half a century later, after a life of exceptional industry, he was in vigor ous health.— New York World.

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A BOY AND A RIFLE. [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

A BOY AND A RIFLE. And the Trtclc the Father Played to Make the YcAnffster Careful. Exact statistics on the subject are lacking, but it Is certain that the man who "didn't know It was loaded" kills and malms annually a great many per- i sons. The only safe rule with a gun is never under any circumstances to point it at anybody. One should always act on the assumption that it is loaded. Unfortunately, though, an average human being learns only by ex- j perience, and where a gun is concerned ! that often entails an awful price. Bearing this in mind a veteran : sportsman of this city adopted a unique method of Impressing this lesson on bis son. This is how be told i the story: i "I want my son to be a sportsman, ' so that when be gets to be as old as i his father he may have as many ' pleasant memories to look back to. . ! Therefore, on bis sixteenth birthday I , gave him a rifle. And instead of read- j ing him a long lecture on the necessity of handling the weapon carefully, I put up ...

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
It font*. [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

It font*. "I'm thinking about that lodger of i ours," the landlord remarked to his , wife. "About what?" I "He pays his rent so punctually I think I'd better raise It on him."—

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE CENSUS OF 1790. [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

THE CENSUS OF 1790. raited State* Population Then Was Lea* Than 4,000,000. When the first census of the United States was taken in 1790, 'there were 16 states nnd the southwest and north* west territories. The returns fixed the population at 3,029,214, while those of 1000 give ov«r 70,000,000, a fourteen* fold growth la 110 years. In the first census nothing was sought but the number of Inhabitants, and the task was assigned to United States mnrshals, who performed the work for several censuses. In the census library is n record of the first census, which shows that the census of 1790 was ordered In March and completed by October, 1791, a very creditable showing wben the difficulty of communication is considered. The popular tion was divided into five classes— free white males of 16 years and upward, including heads of families; free white females, including heads of families; free white males under 16 years, other persons, slaves. Fourteen enumeration districts were mapped out of t...

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
TOD KNOW WHAT TOD ABE TAKINO [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

TOD KNOW WHAT TOD ABE TAKINO When you take Orove'i Tasteless Chill Tonlo because the formula Is plainly printed on every bottle showing that Is Is simply Iron and Quinine In a tasteless form. No. Cure, No pay. Me.

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
They Raised Pairs. [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

They Raised Pairs. While Bishop Potter of the Episcopal church was traveling through Louisiana some years ago be addressed Inquiries to his fellow passengers with a view of obtaining knowledge regarding the orchards and fruit Interests of the state. u Do yon raise pears In Louisiana?" Inquired the bishop. "We do," responded the Loulslanian, "If we have threes or better."— San Francisco CalL

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Page 6 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

The Change of Ufo Is the most important period in a woman's existence. Owing to trodern methods of living, not one woman In a thousand approaches this perfectly natural change without experiencing a train of very annoying and *ometimes painful symptoms. Those dreadful hot flashes, sending the blood surging to the heart until it seems ready to burst, and the faint feeling that follows, sometimes with chills, as if the heart were going to stop for good, are symptoms of a danMns. Jennib Noblb. gerous, nervous trouble. Those hot flashes are just so many calls from nature for help. Tiic nerves are crying out for assistance. The cry should be heeded in time. Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound was prepared to meet the needs of woman's system at this trying period of her life. It builds up the weakened nervous system, and enables a woman to pass that grand change triumphantly. "I was a very sick woman, caused by Change of Life. I suffered with hot flushes, and fainting spells. I was afra...

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Page 6 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

ABSOLUTE SECURITY. Genuine Carter's Little Liver Pills. Must Bear Signature of /^^^^^^ See FaoSlmlle Wrapper Below. Terr small and aa easy to take as sutfur. |pADTrD*cI FOR HEADACHE. (mm trio for dizziness. SP ITTLE rOR BILIOUSNESS. TTIVER FOR TdRPID LIVER. H PILLS Fo * CONSTIPATION. HJra FOR SALLOW SKIM. aaaßaai Iron the complexion M Cwb I Purely .Ta^taMe-X^"^^*"^ CURE SICK HEADACHE.

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Page 6 Advertisements Column 3 [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

The Spring Medicine Is Hood's Sarsaparllla. In thousands and thousands of homes — in cities, towns and villages — thrco doses a day of this great medicine arc now being taken by every member of the family. In pome homes even the visitor is given a teappoonfnl with every meal. Why such wide and general use ? Because Hood's Sarsaparilla Has proved itself by its wonderful effects in cleansing the syetcin of all humors, overcoming that tired feeling, creating appetite, clearing the complexion, giving strength and animation, the best of all Spring Medicines, so that it is par excellence the Spring Medicine. Accept No Substitute. WAS TORTURED An Indianapolis Woman's Sworn Statement of the Way in Which She Was Saved from Death From the Indianapolis Sews I Mrs. Mary K. Burns of 505 Hiawatha j 3treet, Indianapolis, Ind., is living evij donee of the wonderful powers of Dr. i Williams' Pink Pills for Pale People, i the remedy that cures where all others fail. For years she endured all the ; to...

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
STEALING AT PHILIPPINES [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

STEALING AT PHILIPPINES Serjeants Take Flour from the Govern* ment Warehouses General McArthur Makes A Report on Social Evil— Ajuinaldo's Wife and Mother Hit Only Visitors. Manila— The trial of Sergeant Memson, the first case in the commissary scandals, began with the startling disclosure expected. Two witnesses testified that (ipantltles of flour were taken from a government warehouse and sold by three commissary sergeants and two others, who divided the proceeds. Flnnick, proprietor of an American bakery, was criminated and other business men were also involved. The extent of the illegal sales has not been ascertained. Archbishop Chappelle, the papal delegate in the Philippines, has been summoned to Rome. He will sale soon and his return here is improbable. General Mac Arthur has forwarded to Washington a special report on saloons and the social evil in the Philippine islands. Information concerning Aguinaldo's doing is withheld by the authorities. The wife and mother of Aguinaldo...

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
LABOR UNIONS IN POLITICS [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

LABOR UNIONS IN POLITICS New York Organizations to Form a Party NEW YORK— For the first time cince they were organized the principal trades unions in this city decided to go into politics and to start an independent labor party. This decision was reached at a meeting of delegates from twenty-one unions, represented in the board of walking delegates. Philip Wiensemer of the Amalgamated Society of Plumbers and Gas Fitters presided. The meeting was called on account of the recent decisions of the court of appeals declaring the prevailing rate of wages law and the State stone-dress-ing law unconstitutional. These laws, the most radical of their kind that have yc-t been passed in the interest of labor, cost the labor unions many thousands of dollars in carrying on the agitation in their favor, and tbeir annulment is admitted to be a severe blow to labor. Those who conducted the agitation now say that the city officials who were supposed to be most friendly to labor did not stand by the l...

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
RICHES FROM BENEATH ICE [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

RICHES FROM BENEATH ICE Pay Gravel Excites More Miners — Report of Silver Strike on the Upper Pelly Victoria. B. C— Telegrams received from Dawson on the steamer Amur, j which has arrived here, tell of excitement at Nome over the richness of the gravel in the big dumps which j were taken from beneath the ice. They j were giving 30 cents to the pan. A rich strike is also reported at Selkirk from the upper Pelly. F. Brown, an old Comstock silver miner, gives a story to the Dawson News of the finding of a rich silver quartz lead within eight days' travel of Dawson. The first sluicing is reported to have commence;! on Klondyke creeks, but a full sluice head is not expected to be had before another week. J. W. Field is the latest claimant of the Skagway townsite, forming a part of the ground on which Skagway is built and on which he says he lived in 1895. On the way down the steamer Amur picked up the steamer Carrie C. Davis of Seattle, which had broken down and was at the mercy of the w...

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SAID TO HAVE SOLD OUT [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

SAID TO HAVE SOLD OUT Claim' That Ajuinaldo's Capture Was a Fake SALT LAKE CITY, April 16.—Agulnaldo sold out to the United States for $50,000, according to E. B. Nortman, an army contractor, who arrived here from Manila today. He has been in the islands for six years. "I had private sources of information and knew that negotiations were pending between Aguinaldo and General Mac Arthur some time before I left. But I did not need this private information, for it was generally known in Manila that Aguinaldo had named his price and could be had any time it was paid. There was some hesitancy on the part of Mac Arthur in paying that amount when I left, and the deal was consequently hanging fire. The thing was fixed up for Funston to make a pretense of a capture. The correspondents sent out long before the capture knew exactly what was going to be done. "If the authorities had not known it was a cut-and-dried affair, they would never have allowed the information to be given out." "Pio del...

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
STEAMERS FOR THE PACIFIC [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

STEAMERS FOR THE PACIFIC New Company Organized in New Jersey to Operate from Seattle Syracuse, N. V. — The Globe Navigation company will be incorporated at Trenton, N. J. A to own and operate steam and sailing vessels, sailing from Seattle to Pacific coast, Alaskan and Chinese ports. The capital, $1,000,000, is all subscribed. Three 3000-ton steamships in Atlantic ports have been purchased and will sail for Seattle within ten days. The officers of the company are: William Nottingham, Syracuse, president; J. W. ClTse, Seattle, vice-president and reident manager; Lyman C. Smith, Syracuse, treasurer, and W. W. Brown, Toledo, secretary.

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CARRIE NATION IN PATROL WAGON [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

CARRIE NATION IN PATROL WAGON Hatchet Wielder is Arrested at* Kansa City ; KANSAS CITY, Mo— Mrs. Carrie I Nation was arrested in this city on the I charge of obstructing the street, and j hauled to the police station in a patrol j wagon. ■ She was released on a cash bond of '$6, and will be tried in the police court. Mrs. Nation lectured in Kansas City, I Kan., and came over to the Missouri side. She started on a tour of inves- ] tigation among the down-town saloons. 1 A crowd of a thousand men and boys followed her, and at Twelfth and Walj nut streets, where there are saloons on three corners, she was arrested be1! cave the crowd following her blockaded ! the street. She roundly lectured the I saloon men whom she visited.

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Russia Fortifying [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

Russia Fortifying London — Joseph Chamberlain's organ, the Birmingham Post, learns that the Russian ministers of war and marine have issued joint orders for the laying of an extensive system of submarine mines at Port Arthur, Vladivostock and elsewhere in those seas. The apparatus will leave Odessa early in May.

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
REFUSES TO ACCEPT SALARY [Newspaper Article] — Imperial Valley Press — 27 April 1901

REFUSES TO ACCEPT SALARY General John A. Kasson the Peculiar Government Official Reciprocity Commissioner's Treaties Not Acted Upon by United States Senate. He Tenders Resignation. WASHINGTON.— GeneraI John A. Kaeson, of lowa, enjoys the novel distinction of being an officer of the government who refuses to receive a cent of salary, although carried on the salary rolls. General Kasson was appointed by the President immediately after the passage of the Dingley law as special reciprocity commissioner, and his salary is reported to have been $10,000 a year. His negotiations with foreign governments resulted in the reciprocity agreements and reciprocity treaties with France, Great Britain, Argentina, Nicaragua, Ecquador and other countries. Because of the failure of the Senate to act on these treaties, General Kasson decided last month to tender his resignation. President McKinley declined to receive it and requested General Kasson to retain office. As the administration has decided not...

Publication Title: Imperial Valley Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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