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Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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HERDING SHEEP. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

HERDING SHEEP. We have been requested to publish the following section from the State law in reference to the herding of sheep upon the public lands: Section sth.—Nothing in this Act shall be so constructed as to prohibit the herding of sheep upon any unoccupied public land in this State, or of the United States, within said counties; provided, That in the counties of Mendocino, Calaveras, Yuba, Merced, Shasta, Siskiyou, Fresno and Tulare, it shall not be lawful for any person or persons, owning or having charge of sheep, to herd the same on any of the unoccupied lands of this State or the United States, where such herding may cause injury or inconvenience to actual settlers residing contiguous to such lands, who have horses or cattle ranging on such unoccupied lands; and for a violation of this provision, the penalties of section 27, of the Organic Act, to which this is amendatory, shall apply. The working of this law is creating no inconsiderable trouble in the counties specified ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Farm Novelties. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

Farm Novelties. Freak of a Fruit Tree. —We don't pretend to vouch for the following, but give the statement, as we find it in the Placer Herald. Nature somtimes performs wondrous and quite inexplicable freaks, and we shall make it a part of our duty to collect and record under the above head for the benefit of our readers such cases as come to our notice. We copy as follows:—P. M. Andrews, of the firm of Hubbard & Andrews, of this town, has in his lot some choice fruit trees, and among the rest an apple tree of the sweet bower variety, which bears a fine, large, round apple. Last Summer, when the fruit on this tree was about half grown, the tree sent forth a new lot of blossoms, not of the ordinary kind, but almost like a double rose and a little larger than the ordinary apple bloom. A second crop of apples followed these strange blossoms, and are now matured; but these apples are as unlike the first crop as were the spring and summer blossoms. The second crop of rose li...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

A Loss to the Coast.—It is now stated authoritively that Bret Harte is to take up his abode permanently at the East. We can believe that the change may be advantageous to him, in most respects, but to us it will be a grievous loss. He has acquired and maintained here "a reputation which is enjoyed but by few literary men, and has thereby raised the Coast in the estimation of the world. We owe very much to him, and it seems a pity that we cannot make it to his advantage to remain with us. Wherever he may be, however, he will have the hearty good wishes of our California public. Fish Raising.—Parties desiring further information of the California and Lake Tahoe Fish culture Co.'s operations, illustrated in our sample No. Deo. 17, 1870, should address Comer Bros., Truckee, Nevada County, Cal. The expression, "spreading himself like a green bay-tree," is usually considered slang. It is of good parentage, however, as one can ascertain by examining the thirty-fifth verse of the thirty-sev...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Agricultural Industry [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

Agricultural Industry

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Profits of Grape Growing. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

Profits of Grape Growing. In order to realize the largest profits from any branch of fruit growing. Care and judgment must be exercised in the selection of the varieties to be cultivated. In the matter of grapes, for example, two and three times the amount of profits may be derived from some kinds of grapes, over that obtainable from others, when raised for the table. Enormous profits are realized from some of the vineyards in the immediate neighborhood of. this city, especially where proper judgement has been employed in the selection of varieties and corresponding care of their culture. The following figures have been given as reliable and trustworthy:—Mr. Shaw has realized as high as $420 per acre, gross, from his Muscat of Alexandria vines—he has reported an annual average of $270 net. Meister Brothers, report still larger profits—s273 per acre gross, and $775 net from the Alexandria Muscat; and over $450 from black Hamburg, black Malvoise, golden Chasselas and White Tokay. He h...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Pruning Grape Vines—A New Idea. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

Pruning Grape Vines—A New Idea. Editor Pkehs :—I notice that the California Horticulturist, of December, advises "owners of vineyards to prune their vines as soon as time and circumstances will admit." There has been a great deal written, pro and con, on early and late pruning of the grape vine, and there are some facts that are worth considering. I hardly think it proper to advise indiscriminately. Vines grown in scanty soil and in dry parts of the State —the interior valleys and foothills of the Sierra Nevada —should be pruned before the sap starts in the spring, as they require all the nutriment Avhich has been collected and stored in the roots; but vines grown in moist, rich soils, near the coast, are bettor pruned in the spring. The profuse "bleeding" is rather a benefit, as the vines then run less to wood, and fruit better; if so exhausted, moreover, the fruit is less liable to mildew, and is sweeter than on vines early pruned. It is a well known fact that in the hot, dry vall...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Corn Huskings. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

Corn Huskings. To many of the elder portion of our readers, the above title will recall memories of former merry-makings at the East. Scenes of busy hands and cheerful faces, the old barn, the piles of grain, the finding a red ear of corn and its consequences, may be conjured up. The name has to many of both sexes a forcible significance. One little draw-back on such occasions was the unpleasantness of getting the hands sore. The constant friction, the wear and tear, was severe on those whose skin had not attained a very considerable degree of toughness. Our illustration shows a device for preventing this, and of enabling one to do the work more rapidly. The invention consists merely of leather gloves. of the form shown in the cut, which are provided with metallic claws attached, which assist in tearing the husk from the ears. These gloves protect those parts exposed to the wear from the husks, and enable one to husk perhaps double the amount otherwise possible. The glove with the s...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
California Agricultural Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

California Agricultural Notes. Thbobass started around Stockton by the early rains, has boon much of it, destroyed by the recent frosts. The cold weatheh has killed a great many sheep in the upper Han Jaoquin valley. The farmers around "Woodland are holding on to their wheat, believing that the want of rain for the new crop will produce an advance in price. Cows and young calves are said to be dying on the plains about Marysville for want of feed. LAiioEEua. —The Solano Republican has received an egg measuring i'>]i by 7% inches in size. Miuc .l'ou San Frakoisoo.—There are '200 wagons engaged in supplying this city with milk. They deliver 12,000 gallons every day -including the water added. Tule Lands. —The Yallejo Chronicle of December 'J'.'tli says: Smith A Co., who have been reclaiming some hinds a few miles above Yallejo, have nearly completed the reclaiming of about 11,000 acres, all required now being but the erection of n few Hood-gates. This they have sold at a fa...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE HOME CIRCLE [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

THE HOME CIRCLE OUR LADY EDITORS

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A GOOD WIFE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

A GOOD WIFE. A good wife rose from her bed one morn, Ami thought with a nervous dread Of piles of clothes to be washed, and more Tlmn a dozen mouths to be fed. There'! the meals to get for the men in the field, And the children to fix away To school, and the milk to be skimmed and churned; And all to I* done that day. It had rained in the night, and the wood Was wet as it could be; There were puddings and pies to bake, besides A loaf of cake for tea. And the day was hot, and her aching head Throbbed wearily as she said, "If maidens but knew what good wives know They would be in no haste to wed." "Jennie, what do you think I told Ben Brown,'' ('ailed the farmer from the well; And a flush crept up to his bronzed brow, And his eyes half bashfully fell. "It was this," he said, and coming near, He smiled, and stopping down, Kissed her cheek—" 'twas this, that you were the best And dearest wife in town!" The farmer went back to the field, and the wife, In a smiling and absent way, Sang su...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOUSEKEEPING. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

HOUSEKEEPING. [Wbitten fob the Pkess.] " Oh, dear, Annie, how I wish I could once in a while sit down to a well-cooked meal. Cannot you possibly teach that girl how to cook a steak without drying it up to a criKp? And see those biscuits! they are us black as your hat. We always have them cither half burnt up or else under done and soggy." "Well, now, Albert!" the young wife replied; "I am trying to learn how you like things done ; but remember, dear, I never had a chance to learn to cook. We girls were always at school, and never allowed to fuss about the kitchen, and beoanac Ma hated housework, we grew up to think it a horrid bore to have any thing to do with it." 14 The more shame for you," said the husband crossly, " and I advise you, the first thing you do, to go to some thorough housekeeper and spend a few weeks, and get potted in the mysteries of the art of cooking. When I was a bachelor and lived at sister Sue's, such a thing as burnt crust was never seen in the house, and th...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE FASHIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

THE FASHIONS. [Written fob the Press.] Now that the Avar in Europe continues, and the Parisians have other matters to attend to, than setting the fashions for the world; would it not be well for us, as American Women, to consider the subject of dress as a fine art, and endeavor to typify our individual natures, rather than merely copying other nations? That it may become a fine art, is possible, and probable too, if we only give the subject mature thought. For instance, a certain style of hat comes up; and behold the reign of fashion! Old and young, beautiful and ugly, whether becoming or unbecoming, all must bow to its influence until something new takes its place; and all left on the hands of dealers, that is*'old style" are shipped to supply markets more or less remote from the centre of civilization! Indeed such a power has fashion become in this free country of ours that it holds despotic sway over rich and poor alike! Many honest men have been known to commit crimes, in their ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Bookless Houses. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

Bookless Houses. We form judgments of men from the little things about their houses, of which the owners perhaps never think. Flowers about a rich man's house may signify only that he has a good gardener, or that he has refined neighbors, and does what h sees them do. But men are not accustomed to buy books unless they want them. If, on visiting the dwelling of a man of slender means, we find that he contents himself with cheap carpets and very plain furniture in order that he may purchase books, he rises at once in our esteem. Books are not made for furniture; but there is nothing else that so beautifully furnishes a house. The plainest row of books is more significant of refinement than the most elaborately carved sideboard. Give us a house furnished with books rather than furniture. Both if you can; books at any rate. To spend several day in a friend's house, hungering for something to read while you are treading upon costly carpets and sitting upon luxuriant chairs, and sleeping...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

Subscriptions are Coming 1 along lively for ttte Pacific Rural PUM. There was never a time when intelligent and well directed efforts were more needed. in farmingon this coast, than the present. Every reader of our first DOBbflC is now more thoroughly convinced of the value of such a journal to the special interests and general welfare of the community. One hundred and I'iucteeu names have eomoin.on one list, from Sacramento—where we already had a respectable representation. Forty names wero receirrd from Stockton in two days. Our list there will number over one hundred of its best citizens. San Jo*», where our list is large, is increasing its orders. Nap*, Santa Cmz, San Uiego and other counties have sent us oltliM »nd material encouragement, while remittance s are .li.ilv coming in from other parts of the Pudne. and iMtern states. We feel encouraged with the result of our entarprtae. go far, and only ask that its friends ev«JHIMC« still ci L* tinue to extend their efforts, practic...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
OUR WEEKLY CROP. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

OUR WEEKLY CROP. A stroll through our ranch this week shows a flourishing state of affairs, as could not well be otherwise, since the rains have come to our aid. Right at the entrance we find a full-blown illustration of the Thompson Road Steamer, lately imported and promising a rich yield. Next come the beds of Progress in Science and Mechanics: opposite to which is a flowery description written by one Bound East; also crops of interest to Tide Land Owners, and a new species of Granular Fuel,—giving variety to the scene. The next crop is Opium, by the side of which a New Plow has been left. A short distance away stands a grove of Trees, principally th. Orwon Tea-Tne and the LatMOn Cj/prtta. Our Sheep Fold is here, and hen also is an interesting collection of Farm Novelties. Turning a corner, wo come to the Vineyard, and then to a scene of Corn Husking, where the working of I new device is illustrated. We stop hen and make a few Agricultural Notes. Then coming to the cheerful Home C...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
TREE PRUNING. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

TREE PRUNING. Tree pruning is not only an art, but n science as well. To do it right requires much study, observation and experience; or at least the instruction of such experience. Here is a row of street trees, that must be trained high before they, are allowed to branch much; and then to present full, well balanced tops, they must be headed in, or the leading branches must be shortened occasionally. But that line of trees which has been planted for a screen, and a shelter against winds, must be allowed to branch —as close to the ground as convenient and be so pruned as to show a close, compact and even face. Trees planted for shado and for ornament should be so trained as to fully meet a design, in conformity to the conditions and surroundings. Shado trees should bo trained high enough to allow a free circulation of air, and clear unobstructed view beneath their bi'anches; then be made to spread wide, and equally on all sides. Or a group of them may be so trained together as to r...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
TO EASTERN FARMERS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

TO EASTERN FARMERS. To those who contemplate coming to California to settle, avo would say that this is our early spring. Come at once, if you contemplate operating the approaching season. Our grain sowing, planting and transplating lasts from November to May, and sometimes even to June, in some sections of the state ; although early, sowing is becoming altogether the most popular. The present winter now promises a much more favorable season than the last one for immigrants. Desirable land is to be had at more favorable prices than heretofore, — the schemes of land speculators having failed. Our railroads are stretching themselves out into various sections of the state, bringing the days of cheaper transportation near at hand; a good fall of rain has already descended, almost guaranteeing abundant crops; the condition of Europe promises high prices for exports; greenbacks, which our Atlantic friends have formerly had to sell at a great sacrifice, are nearer at par with gold; lumber ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
TO CLUBS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

TO CLUBS. Send in yonr subscriptions as fast as obtained. After the first ten namos have been paid for, others can be added within any reasonable time, thereafter on the same terms. Clubs may be composed partly of names for Rural, and partly for BOXXXTOTO Phess Blanks and extra copies furnished when desired. The Rain. —After some four weeks of dry weatlu"*. much of the time cloudless days and frosty nights, during which the roads had become dry and dusty, and plow* ing had almost ceased, we have ■gain been blessed with rain—not as much as we would desire; but still enough to encourage, not only the farmers, but all others, to hope for at least a moderately favorable season and fair crops. The rain commenced in Oregon, several days before it reached this latitude, and has traveled as far south as San Diego, embracing the entire State of California in its pluvial favors. In the northern and central portions of the State it has been quite copious, and a large quantity of snow has falle...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A CARD. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

A CARD. Having aeen the prospectus of the Pacoto lluKAii Prksb, and believing there is .ureat need iv our comparatively new agricultural districts *>f guoh a journal as therein proposed, the undersicned do not hesitate to state that from the standing reputation and success of its publishers, (Messrs. Dewey & ('«>., proprietors of the Scentific PitKss,) we believe the new journal will be worthy of universal trial by our agricultural and rural population, and that its publication will be fruitful of much usefulness to its subscribers and in forwarding the development of our natural wealth and prolific resources. OHAB F. REED, President state Agricultural Booiety. DX. 3. s. CUBTIB, Y«'lo Co. . WM. H. PARKS, late Prest. Nortli'n Pint. Ag.Boclety. HOIST BECK, S<c'y ('ill. State Agricultural Bociety. c I". WHEELER, Member M-.rfr Board of Agriculture. hoivt Hamilton, iiioinlxT Ht. Board of Agriculture. E MILLS, Member state Board of Agriculture....

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
BEET SUGAR IN CALIFORNIA. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 14 January 1871

BEET SUGAR IN CALIFORNIA. Beet Sugar making having proved us successful here as in other countries, it may be interesting to count, the advantages we have here, over European sugar makers. There appears to be a remarkable uniformity in the percentage of sugar in the white Silt'sian beet, wherever it is used for extraction. Eight per cent, is the European yield of sugar to the ton of beets. It is the same in "Wisconsin and in California. But, while 15 tons of beets are a large yield to the acre in Europe, thirty tons are not an over estimate for a favorable yield in the California bottom lands. Herein we have one great advantage. In Europe, the season for beets is very slmk 4- —about two months. After that, frost comes, and the crop has to be put under cover, involving much handling and carting. Besides, beets lose some of their sugar, by chemical conversion, in subterunean packing. Here, beets may stand in afield all winter and be used as required. It is only in spring time, when th...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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