ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Wide West Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 2,951 items from Wide West, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
2,951 results
RESIDENCE OF MADAME LOLA MONTEZ, GRASS VALLEY. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

RESIDENCE OF MADAME LOLA MONTEZ, GRASS VALLEY. Time has been when the " Residence of Lola Montez" could only have been represented by a palace of towering front and castellated form with all the princely adjunts to them pertaining. Tcmporu mvtantur, et not mutamurcum ilim. The whilom occupant of a throne is now the happy tenant of a ranch. She who had passed the first years of her life in the heart of European civilization is now an inhabitant of the State most recently admitted to the American confederacy. Fortune has made many changes, yet none more striking than this. Yet we doubt not that to the pampered daughter of luxury, even California life has a charm. The freedom of movement, the absence of restraint, the difference in social intercourse, cannot fail to please one whom ennui in her European home was no stranger. Mountain life has a charm for all bold, adventurous spirits, among whom none can deny Lola Moatez a place. And as she roams on the hills thickly covered with the w...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
St. Petersburg. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

St. Petersburg. The foreman of a large engine manufactory, who has lately returned from St. Petersburg, has given the following statement: " Everything now looks very gloomy in St. Petersburg, IB Boots und out of doors. The city! once so beautiful and full of life, is no longer to be recognized. The palaces are converted into barracks, bridges are broken down, the streets covered with tents, for more than 10,000 Bashkeers are said to have come from the governments of Orenburg and Perm, from the steppes and nomad encampments, and to have entered St. Petersburg for the protection of the city, where they make a hideous impression. Whether their numbers are really so great as assigned, I cannot take on myself to affirm ; but tbey might, if every man of them has been brought, for the Bashkeers, in 1853, were set down in the census as 29,000 tamilies. They have still the Tartar weapons of bow and arrow, of lance and bill-hook, and will therefore make capital food for powder. They steal mo...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Empress of Russia. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

The Empress of Russia. In the little town of Marienberg lived a Lutheran minister by the name of Skovronski, who was remarkable for his piety, benevolence, and unwearied efforts in doing good. On returning to his humble dwelling one evening, his attention was attracted by the cries or a child. His horse showed an unwillingness to proceed; he dismounted, and at a short distance on the snow he discovered the object of distress. There lay a half-frozen child. Wrapping it in hia cloak, he remounted his horse, and in a ' short time was at the parsonage. That child was a beautiful little girl, not a year old. It was at once adopted by the pastor, and placed in the care of his faithful servant, an old lady, who had long resided in the family. She was named Catherine, from the circumstance that she was found on St. Catherine's day, the twenty-fifth of November. She was nursed with great care and tenderness, and treated by the family as an only child. Her beauty, docility, antl sweet temper ...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
DEDICATION OF LONE MOUNTAIN CEMETERY. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

DEDICATION OF LONE MOUNTAIN CEMETERY. The Dedication of Lone Mountain Cemetery—the (ireenwood of the I'acitic -took place on Tuesday, May :" 'th. A variety of interesting ceremonies, addresses, music, Ac, graced the occasion. A large number of persons were present from Sun Francisco; and the consecration of v burying-ground—one so admirably adapted by its location and the efforts which ure bving made to render it a resting place for the revered deposited—appeared to be hailed as a new era in our history.

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Snobbism in New York. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

Snobbism in New York. The late of Mr. Sehuvler furnishes a whole sermon to snobs everywhere, KM esjieciully in New York, which may lie listened to with profit hv that large and increasing class nf |>ersons. The family of Schuyler is one of the most res|H'Ctah]c in the country, ami so far this man differs from most of those who build extravagant houses, drive exjM-nsive equipages, and dash and spend the nioiiev (»f other people, in that most siiohhish of all cities the groat, noisy, dirty city of New York. Occasionally, one of the "aristocracy" conies down with a rush, and then there opens a scene of cxtravapinee, folly aud fraud that appals the public who live in quiet country villages, or dwell ajjoa the broad tarms in the rural districts, who have heard with wonder of the noble mansions, aud the many servants, and the gold und sihcr of these city lords. And so it is that extravagance and a foolish desire to live iv large houses, and own grand carriages to outdo one an- ...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
NORTH BEACH, SAN FRANCISCO. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

NORTH BEACH, SAN FRANCISCO. Tlii' acconi|>aiiyiii|f view of North Beanh,Bn Francisco, is taken from one of the hill* in the vicinity. It gives a fine view i>f v part of the suburbs of the city, which have not, we believe, hitherto been included in views of San Francisco. The little Island in the bay is Alcatraz or Itird Island, on which we are assured there is a government light-house : but have no other evidence of its existence. Ueyond it is Angel Island, to the right of which vessels |«iss in going to Sacramento. At the extreme right of the picture the hills of Contra Costa loom into view. The wharf running out into the bay is located near the end of Powell Street. The hulk at the left of the picture was formerly used as a hospital.

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE FRENCH BOOTBLACK. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

THE FRENCH BOOTBLACK. Indignant Frenchman.- Hec.ar! I ay Hlack zk Hoot Al l. ZK WAV TO 7.X COHIIKSCLMONU Of ZK I.KU, AN HB AY osrara an Two DIME.

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

TREED.

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

Ths French.—l left France, after all, with regret, for I like the people—the common people, I mean, for I had relations with no other. Careless, unreliable, cunning, extortionate, unscrupulous, ignorant, and dirty, as most of them are, yet I like them ; first, for their'inimitable, unweariable politeness; and next, RW their gnvitv, their sparkling vivacity, their quick wit, their linaillßlll, their very ridiculousness. Truth with them is a myth, a jest, an absolute idea; but the lies they tell you'are of the most flattering kind —agreeable delusions, for which you feel rather obliged than otherwise ; and they will impose upon you with such an air that you really" are ashamed to show proper resentment.— Grace GreenwuxV* ** Jfaps aud Mtihapt." — 0 l£T Money may be the mot of all evil, but we should have no objection to a trunk of it

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
American Newspapers. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

American Newspapers. Whatever difl"crenol»W opinion may exist in our country ~n the gnat political measures of "the day, there can be no doubt Hat the popular Tress is about as free, faithful, and full in their discussion as it well can be. The recent ail aggie to llnch .■pinions have been subjected in ' our midst, has brought out the whole strength of the Tress on both sides, and has served to define, in sharp, j severe outline, the growing characteristics of its [lower and importance. Certain it is, that Congress has utterly lost all pretension t.> a leadership of public ..pinion. Once it had this proud distiuctMPW jt is gone—utterly ■DM, Any n.tlucntial paper, IS the United States, does more at this day to direct public thought and settle public sentiment than half-a-dozen statesmen. It discusses all great questions tar better- with more range—with deeper subtlety with much more ciliaustivencss. lA't any man compare the debates iv Congress with the debates among Editor...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Jullien. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

Jullien. Jullien has ciiiiii', anil is gone. Hereafter, when he either thinks or speaks of the United States, he may do so in the thoughts or language of another—" Vein, vidi, vici." We nave heard his music -much of it we have admired. We honor him for his devotion to the Divine Art. He has our money—and now, to what good account can we turn our investment I We have heard music of the most classic and severe style, correctly and -.""<.'v..7/ rendered. The same could have been ■gj* equally well, by our artists, resident in New York, we have heard florid and clap-trap music from J"™"' ** pleasingly rendered, perhaps, as was possible. The same could have been done equallt/ mil by our artists resident in New York. As many artists could be «°- -gether into one monster orchestra turn; as .lulhen had in his; possessing, possibly, with two or three exceptions as much ability as members of his had. lint then it must be confessed, we have no Jullien to lead, guide and control such ...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE BIG LUMP MAN. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

THE BIG LUMP MAN. Here they are! Big I.mps and Stk-k-r-onglt Flavored! EvElI-K-YBOOY BI'YS 'Eu!

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
De Quincey. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

De Quincey. He is one of the smallest-legged, smallest-bodied, most i attenuated effigies of the human form divine, that one could meet in a crowded city in a day's walk. And if one adds to this figure clothes neither fashionably cut nor fasI tidiously adjusted, he will huve a tolerable idea of Do 1 Quincey's outer man. But his brow, that pushes his obtrusive'hat to the bock of his head, and his fight grey eyes that do not seem to look out, but to be turned inward, 1 sounding the depths of his imagination, and searching out the mysteries of the most abstruse logic, are something that you would search a week to find the mates to, and thon'vou would be disappointed. De Quincey now resides at Lasswade, a romantic rural village, "lice the residence of Sir Walter Scott, about seven miles from Edinburgh, Scotland, when' an affectionate child watches him, and where he is the wonder of the country for miles around.

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

SIGNS OF THE TIMES.

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 25 December 1854

WIDE THE WEST. BONESTELL & WTLLISTON, Publishers, COUET BLOCK, CLAY STREET, San Francisco.

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE RAINY SEASON IN THE MOUNTAINS.. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 25 December 1854

THE RAINY SEASON IN THE MOUNTAINS.. When Nature doa frown in California, she makes her power felt Clouds gather around the peaks of tbe mountains, growing blacker and blacker, and spreading wider and wider till the summer snn is hid and the smiling sky shows itself only in patches of a bluish white, where the clouds arc most penetrable. The suow settles on the highest hills as the white hairs gather on an old man's head with the coming of sorrow. The beasts seek their winter lairs; while the rivers dash from their sources to the sea, wider and wilder, day after day, till in rain-fed torrents they tear from their bases the miner's dams and flumes, and crowd around his cabin, lashing his door with waves that seem to demand the treasures stolen from their beds in their summer absence. Tbe ■ provident miner has built his hut and patiently awaits the few weeks of sunshine that winter allows as a recompense for its ravages, knowing that in that short period the industrious may reap their ...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
RIVER MINING. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 25 December 1854

RIVER MINING. Tue toil necessary to fretting out the precious metal from the bed where it has lain undisturbed jierhaps for centuries can scarcely be appreciated by persons at a distance. Even in diggings where the.mere sinking of a hole is sufficient, it is labor by no means light, particularly when the precarious nature of the remuneration is considered, or the hopes and fears that alternately till the bosom as the prospect fluctuates. But it is in the overcoming of natural obstacles -works that can only be accomplished by means of association, that the full force of the difficulties attendant on mining in California can be appreciated. Tunneling, shaft-sinking, conveying water into dry diggings, all require an immense amount of labor which has to be performed before a blow can be struck bearing approximately on the real object. Sometimes months elapse before these preliminary works are completed. In " River Mining," a view of which is given above, it is necessury sometimes to tur...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A CHINESE BATTLE IN CALIFORNIA. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 25 December 1854

A CHINESE BATTLE IN CALIFORNIA. The Chinese ,n California are as great a puzzle as they are a nuisance. They arc unanimous in nothing but vice. Those among them who have the are continually levying taxes for some inexpiable purpose on those of their countrymen who are able to p,v them and afraid to refuse. The more their institution, are studied the less are they understood. The only reason they themselves are ever known la give for the various disturbance, that arise among them i, the existence of a ! secret society of which no member ever was seen, or I I known to exist by any of the received rules of evidence, i i Still, that there is some cause continually operating to produce collisions among them is undeniable, in whatever shape it comes. In all parts of the country they are quarreling with each other, in a manner that would argue that they traveled in parties, whose members were about ! balanced in their adherence to diverse opinions. Their i battles are more remarkable for t...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Origin of Fynch Faw. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 25 December 1854

Origin of Fynch Faw. «Ie afternoon, which requires a " little within" l» off, make up your mind that unless he drives L nstitn CfT" When a person is carrying a cotton umbrella it is, curiously enough, never his own property —he has "just borrowed it from a friend." A Schoolboy's Aspiration.—Oh how I wish I were a fountain, for then I could be always playing!— Punchinello. Wk L! ? Ll "'' o Q UB,TION 'OR THE TOPOGRAPHICAL SoCIETT — v> hether it is easier for a person who is on the High Keiad to Hum, to pass a Note, or hi meet a Bill» The prize bull at tho Agricultural Fair, we hear, is one (hat was made by an Irishman, who observed-" that the best plough horses were a pair of mules." Tin. l Washington Srnttn<<', iv a long and interesting article on tins subject, mti : < " Lynch Law originated in what ia now known an the Piedmont country "t Virginia, which was at the tune the , western frontlet. The nearv»t c»»iirt of ennnnal jurisdiction h&a...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
NATIVE CALIFORNIANS BREAKING WILD HORSES. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 25 December 1854

NATIVE CALIFORNIANS BREAKING WILD HORSES. Tue wild horses in California an- of Arabian origin, as is evidenced by various peculiarities of their organization and the statements of history regarding their introduction into the country. In a laud devoted almost ••ntirely to grazing purposes it is not surprising that they .hoiild become hardy and free from disease to an extent unknown at the East. It is equally a natural consequence that those whose property they are and whose existence is dependent on the multiplication of their stock should be- MMM exceedingly expert in horsemanship, lassoing, Ac. Breaking a horse, even in more tltickly settled countries, is not an undertaking without risk ; but berv it is indeed a dangerous feat, and one evidencing in every phase the stubbornness of the animal and the spirit and bravery nf the rider. There is no mode of attack or defence to which the horse will not resort to defeat the purpose of the rider; there is no movement so sudden that it has...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
x
Loading...
x
x