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Elephind.com contains 2,741,685 items from Examiner, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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MUNICIPAL. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

MUNICIPAL. Very little civic history was made in 1899. It was an uneventful year so far as matters municipal are concerned, but for all that one of steady progress. Especially has this been so in connec- tion with the electric light undertak- ing, which is making way with a most satisfactory rapidity. In 1897 and 1898 new private lamp connections aver- aged from 42 to 44 eight candle-power (equivalent) lamps per week. During the first six months of 1899 this aver- age increased to 66 eight candle-power (equivalent) lamps per week, and since then the average has been slightly greater, so that this year shows an in crease of over 50 per cent more lamps connected than in 1897 and 1898. The rental system no doubt accounts for a great part of this large increase. The revenue, too, has been coming in at a rate exceeding the most sanguine ex- pectations. The street lighting has been greatly improved during the year, several additional lamps having been connected, and a number of old lamps ...

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

HEALTH. With regard to thet health of the city during the year the only item of impor- tance to remark upon is the recent se- vere outbreak of influenza, which has been prevalent, not only in Launceston, but all over the colonies. Very few cases of typhoid (11 in all) have been reported: in fact, the city has been more free from this disease during 1899 than in any year since the Health De- partment has been established. Only one death was caused by it. Some iso- lated cases of scarlet fever occurred from time to time. On the whole, with the exception of the influenza out- break, the health of the city has been exceptionally good.

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
1899. REVIEW OF THE YEAR. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

1899. REVIEW OF THE YEAR. We have rung out the year of 1899 and rung in that of 1900, the last of the century, and, according to our custom, we present our readers with a brief re- view of the principal events of the last twelve months as they have affected the colony. It has been a year of pro- gress and prosperity, a year which has been fraught with many blessings to us as a community. In the first place we had a bountiful harvest, one of the most bountiful in the history of the colony. Prices may not have been as satisfactory as our farmers would have liked, but the decline in rates has been made up in the extra yield. Moreover, our agriculturists have not been depen- dent on one crop, and if wheat was low other produce has commanded satisfactory rates. Again, wool has been higher than for many years past, and the extra value received for their clip has proved an acceptable addition to the income of our pastoralists. Our principal metals also have been in de- mand, tin especially...

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
FEDERATION. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

FEDERATION. Another, and practically the last, step towards the adoption of the Common wealth Bill has been taken during the year. The original bill was regarded as unsatisfactory to New South Wales, and Mr. Premier Reid, who had made a mistake in his attitude on the ques- tion, sought to retrace his steps by calling a conference of Premiers to discuss some alterations which he desired made. They met in Melbourne in January, and agreed to a few amend- ments, which enabled Mr. Reid to go back to New South Wales as the avowed friend of the cause. The alterations, however, necessitated the remission of the bill again to the elec- tors, and South Australia led the way. In New South Wales and Queensland the fight was bitter, but the bill was carried in every colony except West Australia by increased majorities. In the western colony Parliament is the chief obstruction, as it refuses to sub- mit the bill to the electors. If it were done it is expected that it would also be adopted there, ...

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
MINING. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

MINING. Mineral to the approximate value of some £1,500,000 was exported from Tasmania during the year just closed, and this roughly exceeds the value of that sent away in 1898 by £600,000. A practical proof is thus given of the remarkable development of the mineral industry of the colony. Dividends to the amount of £340,000 (approxi- mately) were also paid during the 12 months, as against £280,000 in the pre- vious year, while the number of miners employed reached the figure of 6549, or over 500 more than in 1898. The, de- partment revenue, however, was not so large in 1899 as in the previous year, the amount being given at £37,000, as against £45,508; but this only shows that there was not a great rush in taking up sections, though some 50,000 acres were secured by 1170 applicants. The energy was rather shown in the development of the pro- perties already secured, and the re- turns from these must be considered as highly satisfactory. Forty-six new companies, with a nominal capi- ...

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
AGRICULTURAL AND PASTORAL. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

AGRICULTURAL AND PASTORAL.   The agricultural history of the past year has, on the whole, been satisfac- tory, and hopes are entertained, that for the future Tasmania's progress in this direction will be rapid. In 1898-9, as compared with the preceding year, there was an estimated increase of total-land under crop from 242,241   acres to 258,224 acres, explained as follows:- 1897-8. 1898-9. Incr's. Decr's Acres. Acres. Acres. Acres. Wheat ......... 85,905 85,547 - 358 Oats ........... 38,166 59,076 20,910 - Potatoes ....... 22,357 20,266 - 209 Other crops .... 95,813 93,335 - 247 And the increase of production was- Wheat from 1,668,341 bushels to 2,349,100 bushels; oats from 1,102,285 bushels to 2,270,268 bushels; potatoes from 49,124 tons to 87,757 tons. The average wheat yield per acre rose from 19 bushels to 27 bushels. The wheat harvested in 1898-9 was in excess of estimated local consumption by 1,178,650 bushels. The aggregate value of agricultural, pa...

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
BOERS IN DAMARALAND. RECRUITING STOPPED BY GERMANS. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

BOERS IN DAMARALAND. RECRUITING STOPPED BY GERMANS. Owing to the utter exhaustion of the Boer reserves, all the available men having been already ordered out on commando, the allied republics are making great efforts to enlist foreigners for the service. Their attention was first turned to German West Africa, where there is a small military force and a population of about 1200 German civilians, most of whom are ex-soldiers and capable of bearing arms. The German authorities have, how ever, intervened, and are taking mea- sures to prevent any recruiting among German subjects. In the United States Boer agents are active, and men are being enlisted un- der the pretence of joining the Trans- vaal ambulance service.

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
IMPERIAL YEOMANRY. FORMATION ASSURED. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

IMPERIAL YEOMANRY. FORMATION ASSURED. The enrolment of the Impierial Yeo- manry is proceeding so well that its formation with 10,000 men is now as- sured. H.R.H. the Prince of Wales has ac- cepted the position of colonel-in-chief, and has donated 100 guineas towards its equipment. A sum of money has been contri- buted by the Stock Exchanges sufficient to purchase 100 horses for the Yeo- manry.

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
AMERICANS VOLUNTEERING. MUST ENLIST IN ENGLAND. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

AMERICANS VOLUNTEERING. MUST ENLIST IN ENGLAND. The general sympathy felt by citi- ens of the United States with Great Britain has been vividly illustrated by the manner in which American subjects are coming forward to offer their ser- vices to Great Britain in the Transvaal war. Mr. C. Carlisle, the British Consul at New York, has already received more than 5000 offers from Americans desir- ous of fighting in the British ranks against the Boers. The Consul, while thanking the American volunteers, has replied that men can only be enlisted in England.

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
LIEUTENANT CHURCHILL'S REPORT. HIS RECOMMENDATION. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

LIEUTENANT CHURCHILL'S RE- PORT. HIS RECOMMENDATION. Lieutenant Winstone Churchill, the war correspondent of the "Morning Post," who was captured in the ar- moured train disaster at Chievely and afterwards escaped from Pretoria, has communicated to Sir Redvers Buller a mass of valuable information respect- ing the strength and feeling of the enemy. He estimates that the total Boer losses up to the time of his flight were at least 2000 in killed, although every effort was made to prevent the actual number of casualties being known. A feeling of great depression was evi- dent among all classes, and in order to sustain their fighting line the enemy had exhausted their last reserves. In consequence of the hopeless na- ture of the situation, desertions were already becoming frequent. In order to thoroughly pacify the country and stamp out the last em- bers of rebellion, Lieutenant Churchill advises that the Imperial Government should despatch at least 250,000 troops to South Africa, with...

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
THANKSGIVING, NOT HUMILIATION. REV. PRICE HUGHES'S VIEW. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

THANKSGIVING, NOT HUMILIA- TION. REV. PRICE HUGHES'S VIEW. Concerning the proposal to celebrate a day of humiliation in connection with the war, the Rev. Hugh Price Hughes, M.A.; ex-president of the Wesleyan Conference and editor of the "Metho- dist Times," has given a strong ex- pression of his views. He favours, instead of humiliation, a day of thanksgiving for the readiness of the Britons to surrender even life itself in order to ensure freedom and justice in South Africa.

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
DOCTOR LEYDS. HIS LATEST MOVE. Dec. 31. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

DOCTOR LEYDS. HIS LATEST MOVE. Dec. 31. Dr. Leyds, the Agent of the Trans- vaal Republic in Europe, continues his efforts to cause trouble for Great Britain in different quarters. His latest effort is an endeavour to induce the Egyptian agitator, Mus- tapha Kiamil to shake off British con- trol.

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
NOTES ON THE CABLES. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

NOTES ON THE CABLES. (By Rhodesian.) It is apparent that the period of in activity in Natal is rapidly drawing to a close. Sir Redvers Buller has re- ceived reinforcements amounting to 8000 men and 18 tuns, and two more batteries have left Capetown for Dur- ban, and will doubtless be at the front in a few days. The withdrawal of the British force to Chievely did not tempt the Boers to follow them; on the con- trary, those who were to the south and west of that river have gone northward and joined their comrades, while some of the laagers have been shifted nearer to Ladysmith. These movements, and the renewed bombardment of that place, would make it appear as if one more desperate effort will be made to capture the town before the arrival of Buller's force. This will make the British general all the more eager to follow up the enemy, and will make it the worse for the Boers when he does so, as they will lay themselves open to an attack from White in the rear, and he is not the man to...

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
A SHARP SKIRMISH. SOUTH OF DE AAR. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

A SHARP SKIRMISH. SOUTH OF DE AAR. Reuter's correspondent at the Vic- toria West camp, some distance south of De Aar, reports that there has been a sharp skirmish with the Boers. The reporter states that the enemy intended to cut the railway communica- tion with De Aar, when they were de- tected and the attack made.

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
INDIAN OFFICERS. MEN AND HORSES. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

INDIAN OFFICERS. MEN AND HORSES. Ceylon will send a contingent of mounted volunteers to South Africa in response to the appeal of Great Bri- tain. The British Government has accepted offers of horses from the Maharajahs of Mysore, Jaipur, and Cashmere.

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
PEACE-AT-ANY-PRICE POLICY. A STRONG PROTEST. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

PEACE-AT-ANY-PRICE POLICY. A STRONG PROTEST. Rev. Mr. Kinsmen, of Greenwich, an ex-chairman of the Baptist Union, has made an emphatic protest against the peace-at-any-price party. He is especially strong in his con- demnation of Mr. W. T. Stead, editor of the "Review of Reviews," and the Rev. Silas Kitto Hocking, of the Methodist Free Church.

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
GREAT EVENT IMPENDING. A PRESS OPINION. Dec. 30. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

GREAT EVENT IMPENDING. A PRESS OPINION. Dec. 30. The "Morning Post" has an impor- tant despatch from its correspondent with General Sir Redvers Buller's force on the Tugela River. He states that a great event is now impending. According to the correspondent of the "Daily Telegraph," the Boers who had gathered on the south-west of Colenso have recrossed the river.

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
BOMBARDMENT OF LADYSMITH. UNUSUALLY HEAVY. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

BOMBARDMENT OF LADYSMITII. UNUSUALLY HEAVY. The laagers northwards of the Tugela have moved closer to Ladysmith, and it is considered probable that strong pressure will be brought to bear on the garrison to make it yield. It is reported that the latest bom- bardment of the town was of an un- usually vigorous character.

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
AN IMPORTANT CAPTURE. A CONTRABAND CARGO. GERMAN OFFICERS AND TROOPERS. Dec. 31. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

AN IMPORTANT CAPTURE. A CONTRABAND CARGO. GERMAN OFFICERS AND TROOPERS. Dec. 31. H.M.S. Magicienne captured the Ger- man East African steamer Bundesrath is in Delagoa Bay. The passengers included three Ger-   man officers and 20 men in the khaki uniform, who intended joining the Boers. A prize court is to be held at Durban, as the owners of the Bundesrath (which is detained) contend that the cargo is not contraband. Herr Von Bulow, Minister of Foreign Affairs for Germany, is reported to have promised to interpose in the matter.

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
WESTERN FRONTIER. LORD METHUEN'S RECONNIASSANCE. N.S.W. LANCERS ENGAGED. LONDON, Dec. 29. [Newspaper Article] — Examiner — 1 January 1900

WESTERN FRONTIER. LORD METHIUEN'S RECONNAIS- SANCE. N.S.W. LANCERS ENGAGED. LONDON, Dec. 29. On the 26th inst. Lieut.-General Lord Methuen made a reconnaissance from his position at the Modder River in the direction of Spytfontein, with the object of drawing the enemy's fire, and thus discovering their posi- tion. In this movement, which was suc-, cessful in unmasking a Boer battery of six guns, the Sydney Lancers took an active share.

Publication Title: Examiner
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Tas, Australia
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