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Title: Gippsland Mercury Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 32,835 items from Gippsland Mercury, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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HEALTH NOTES. The Evil of Late Suppers. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

HEALTH NOTES. The Evil of Late Suppers. Late or heavy suppers are a com mon cause of insomnia, especially that teorm of it in which people fall into a heavy sleep, only to awake with a start an hour or two later and lind themselves unable to sleep again until early morning perhaps. Digestion comes almost to a dead stop during sleep, so that sufficient time should be allowed for the last meal to be dis posed of before the hour for retiring. This interval should be two hours at least, which means that half-past eight is as a rule late enough for the evening meal. In any case, the food which is taken then ought to be of a light nature, and not include pork, cold meat, or any other article of diet which is slow of digestion. Coffee and strong tea are unsuitable at this hour, as they tend to cause sleep lessness. Cocoa, made with water, is a much better beverage for use willt tl e evening meal or after it.

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Impure Air and Scrofula. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

Impure Air and Scrofula. The atmosphere of all rooms should be frequently renewed by proper ven tilation. The best method of accom plishing this has been for many years a subject closely studied by sanitar ians. In rooms, and especially in bed rooms, the fireplace should always be left unclosed. The windows should be pulled down from the top, and up from the bottom. All rooms, and es pecially sleeping apartments, should be well aired during the day. Imnpure air in bedrooms is considerd by emin ent medical authorities to be one of the most potent causes of consumption and scrofula. A well-known French physician who has devoted much at tention to studies of this nature says: "lt will often be found, on examina tion, that scrofulous diseases are caused by vitiated air, and it is not always necssary that there should have been a prolonged stay in such an atmosphere. Only a few hours each day is sufficient; and a person may live in a most healthy district, pass the greater part of each d...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DAIRYING SUGGESTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

DAIRYING SUGGESTIONS. The following suggestions are the experience of Mlr. \V, M. Rider, of the Winona Agricultural College, U.S.A.: Test your herd for economic produc tion. Weigh milk from each cow night and morning, one day each month. 'Take samples of each milking and test it for butter fat. Knowing the milk and fat given in one dlay, use these figures as an aver age day's production for the current month, and. by multiplying the milk and fat produced by the number of days in the month, you obtain the total anmtnt of milk and butter fat (in pounds) produced for one month. Weigh feed fed on day of test, and from thie cost of each feed figure the cost of feed fed each cow on day of test. From Ihe daily cost of feed per cow, compute the cost of her feed for one month. If the milk is sold as milk, compute the value of each cow's milk for the month at the market price received. Knowing the money value of each cow's milk for the month, and the cost of her feed, one can find the net val...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
EXPERIENCE IMPERATIVE. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

EXPERIENCE IMPERATIVE. It requires the same treatment of good jt.dmnent and perseverance to succeed in the poultry business as it does .n other lines of business. There are not any more adverse conditions to encounter than there are in other lines. But about the first time a poultry-raiser encounters a really dis couraging thing, his enthusiasm suf fers such a shock as to make recovery doubtful. There is not another busi ness that can be mentioned the pro duct of which is in greater demand. Then, why should large numbers of people who enter it continue to fall? The greatest reason Is because a great majority of those who take up poultry-raising do so without any pre vious knowledge of the business. The next great reason is because of the continued problems which come up daily to be solved, and which, if not solv _l with good -Judgment, lead to positive disappointment and loss. Thirdly, because .profits do not roll in a. fast as they had been led to be lieve they would by the extrava...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

WATSON'S_ N1I .SUPREME AMONG SCOTCH WHISKIES AGE AND QUALITY GUARANTEED. JAlES WATSO N & C° L'-° DVNE.E. oWQWY J&ZP I _ _ _ _ _ T o INV E N TORS PATENT S Obtained In Commonwealth and Else where for improved methods of Appli ances, Tools, etc., of any description. Full Information, Cosats, etc., sent on application to A. O,. SAG SE, G.E. AUSTRALIAN WIDOWS' FUND BUILDINGS, Corner Collins and William Sts., MELBOURNE. Too Much for the Ghost. Archbishop Thomson once "laid" a ghost in a very simple way. Staying at a country house with traditions of a family ghost, he was put up for the night in the "haunted chamber." In the morning his hosts were anx ious to know if he had seen anything. "Oh, yes," he replied: "about twelve o'clock I heard a knock at the door. 1 said. 'Come ih, come in.' " "And did he come:" "Yes; an old sallow-looking man." "Yes, that is our ghost! What did you do'?" "I got out ao bed and asked if he belonged to the house. He nodded as sent. I asked himt ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IN FANNY BURNEY'S GARDEN. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

IN" FANNY BURNEY'S GA'RDEN. An amusing account of the horti cultural pursuits-and ineptitude-of General d'Arblay, the French emigre who became Fanny Burney's hus band, is given in an article in the "Cornhill" by Sir Henry Lucy: The young couple began their mar r.ied life in apartments in a farm house on lhe summit of Bagden Hill. Thence they moved to a somewhat larger cottage at Bookham. Finally, when "Camilla" proved a financial success. they built themselves a house on the outskirts of Norbury Park, known during their residence as "Camilla Cottage." From tile first, M. d'Arblay, con scious of inadequacy to bear his fair share in the wherewithal for meeting the cost of the little household, de veloped a fearsome frenzy for gar dening. Pursuit of the vocation in volved him in delightfully ludicrous dile mmas. Writing under date April. 17".i, from the cottage at Bookham, the younttg wife says:- "Think of our horticultural shock last week when Mrs. Bailey, our land lady, entreated him...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Avoiding Eye-Strain. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

Avoiding Eye-Strain. Eye-strain is said to be largely a defect of civilisation. To counteract it, children should be encouraged to use their eyes at long range. A teacher who has a surprisingly small amount of eye-strain among her pupils attri butes it to her practice of making the scholars drop their work at the end of each hour and look out of the win dow. There is a contest as to who can see the farthest. This rests and trains the eyes and teaches observa tion. A woman who does fine sewing for her living found her eyes strained and weak. She was advised to drop her sewing every half-hour and look for .: minute into space. Relief was quick, and the eye-strain disappeared. Short-sighted people who hold their book or work close will ease eye strain and lengthen their vision if they frequently remove their glasses mnd look at some object on the hori zon. The long-distance training will not, however, relieve eye-strain that comes from .atigmatism, reckless dis regard of the eyes, or f...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A BERESFORD IN WAR-TIME. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

A BERESFORD IN WAR-TIME. The Beresfords have all been fa mous for the courage that borders on recklessness. Lord William Beres ford served in the Zulu War in 1879, winning the V.C., and in his book, "Campaigns of a War Correspondent," MIr. Melton Prior relates some striking stories of him: In the retreat Lord William Beres ford, turning around, saw the four legs of a white horse kicking in the air, Realising at. once that it belonged to one of our men, he rode straight for it, and found that the horse had been shot and that the rider had fallen half stunned. "Get up!" Lord William said to the man, but he seemed to dazed to an swer; whereupon Lord William said, "If you don't get up at once I will jump down and punch your head!" -at which the man did rise slowly. Lord William succeeded in helping him on to the horse behind him; once mounted, the man clutched Beresford around the waist, and so they gallop ed off. All the time. this was taking place the Zulus were firing from a donga cl...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE KHEDIVE AND THE AMERICAN SALESMAN. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

THE KHEDIVE AND THE AMERICAN SALESMAN. An amusing remliniscence of the present Khedtive of Egypt is told by M ir . . Alexander PF iell, late consular representative of 11i0 United States at AlexandrIa, ini his book, "The Last LFrontier." 31:'. -owcell says he re ceived a cii f!, il ithe chairman of an \Amrican lia',n whose special line of businessh ' wais tih manufacture of agricultural and ,. ell-drilling machin ery. Lr. Pow ell's visitor explained that as he was passing through Egypt he thought it might be possible to ob lain an audience with the Khedive:- '.:: Agriculture and its attendant prob IRnis of irrigation and fertilisation constitute tiee sole hobby and amuse ient of the present Khedive, Abbas iiilni. lie is consequently .a ready and liberal purchaser of all-imprboved types of agricultural- machinery, \vlich hie puts to practical use on his' great estates. The' request:; of -:my cotipatrioto was duly :transmitted` to the grand master of -ceremonies, and shortly thereafte...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Obvious. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

Obvious. Mr. Tom Mann, whose imprisonmeut is still heing warmly discussed, told a Coventry audience that hie was an agitalor. Thero was an olbviousness about the remark that recalls Mr. Zangwill's story of the hunchback on board a steam?er who became very friendly with a stranger with vetr pronounced features. The latter, tin a burst of coutidence, whispered: J am a Jew." "Confidence for confidence," replied the tirst man-"! am a hunchback!! Few ministers were better loved by their flock than Bishop Iteese. of Sa vannah. It is told of him that when he was rector of a parish he saw one of his parishioners talking very emphati cally to his son. Dr. Reese called out: "Halloa, Tom! What are you go uig to do with that boy of yours?" The old man advanced to the door and replied: "What am I going to do with-him? Well, I will tell you, doctor. I am going to do with my son what you can not do with yours." "Oh, indeed!" said the doctor. "And pray what is that?" "Why, I'm going to make a bette...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
George Ade's Quarters. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

George Ade's Quarters. George Ade was showing a report er over his apartment at the Chicago Athletic Club. "Wonderful! Superb!" Such were the reporter's ejaculations before Mr. Ade's rugs and p!etures. At the end of the ir.pection, in answer to an enthusiastic compliment on his taste. Mr. Ado said with a laugh: "Married men have better halves, but we bachelors bare better quar ters. eh?" "But, madam," said the surgeon after the woman had recovered con sciouPness in the hospital, "why did'it you stop when the crossing policem::n held un his hand? Then you would''t have been struck by the moaor car!" '"What! Me stop when Jim Magin nis holds up his hand? 1'd let you know I'm his wife, an' he never saw the day when he could boss me."

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Optimist. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

The Optimist. ('har'es the First, with stately walk, made tle journey to the block. A\< Io paced the stireet along, silence fci n1pon the throng; froll that throt.? there burst a sigh, for a king we comei to dlle! Charles upon the scaffold stcod, i^ his veins no craven blood: cainm. serene, he viewed the crowd, while the. headsm?an said. aloud'- "Cheer up, Charlie' Smile and sing! Death's a most delightful thing! I wili cure youlr hacking cough when I chop your head piece off! Heanachte, tolotaclhe-they're a bore. You 'nwl never have them more! Cheer u1. Charlie, dance and veil' Here's tno axe. and all is well! '1, though but a humble dub, repre sent the Sunshine Club. and our motto is worth while: 'Do not worry-sling and smile!' 'Therefore let us both be gay, as we do our stuint to-day: I to swing the shining axe, you to take a few swift whacks. "Lumpty-doodle, Iml?ptl-ding; do ot worry, smile and sing:'! --Walt Mason.

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The "Fruits" of Ambition. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

The "Fruits" of Ambition. "If you are ambitious and want to get on in life. don't wait for your opportunity-make it." So counselled Mlr. Kalestick to young Kabbage. whom he had just appoint ed to the management of a green grocery store. All that day the youth pondered the advice, and he still remembered it when his eye suddenly caught an item in the sporting columns of his favor ite paper: "Clodville Football Club re quires dates for December." Two minutes later Kabbage was busy with pen. ;nk and paper, and in ten more minutes he was proudly con ning the following note to the Clod ville secretary: "Dear Sir,--I beg to inform ycu that we have a choice lot of dates in stock. Enclose one as a sample, and will be pleased to supply any quantity at twopence a pound, or four pounds for sevenpence ha'penny."

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Just the Reverse. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

Just the Reverse. A kind-hearted and witty clergyman, entering the house of one of his el ders one morning found the good old man unmercifully whipping oe of his sons, a lad %boLt fourteen years old, and he at once began to intercede for the boy. The deacon defended himself by saying that "the youth must be early trained in the way he should go. It is best to make an imptession when the wax is soft " "Yes,' said the pastor, "but that does not hold nere for the whacks were not soft." The deacon let I he boy go. Art is but an indifferent stepmother to nature's children. Anatomists, to separate the bones of a skull, sometimes fill it with small beans and place the whole in a basin of water. The beans swell and slow ly split the skull

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A FRIEND OF MAN. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

A FRIEND OF MAN. Many travellers have brought back from South Africa astonishing stories of the intelligence and cunning of the little honey-bird, which guides mcii faithfully to the nests of the wildt bees. Some of them are a little hard to believe, but the united testimony of so many competent observers rnakmea it certain that in essentials the reports are true. An interesting account of the bird is given by a correspondent of "Forest and Stream"- "A hunter or traveller at times will be astonished by the antics of this intelliecnt little bird, which alights on the iwig of a tree an chirps incessant ly with a shrill note. If you move to wards it the noisy little creature will Imalie a slow hlight to a tree near and continues its chirping; follow it again and the same performance is gon-" through. Return to the camp, ant the bird will follow you, always making: the same noise to attract your atten tion, and will patiently stay, often an hour and a half, trying to get you to( follow ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE TRUTH ABOUT COWS. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

THE TRUTH ABOUT COWS, Some time ago a schoolmaster in a country school asked his pupils to write an essay on cows. Here is the "effort" of a farmer's son: The cow is a no-bull and klne-heart ed creature. The man who looks after cows is called a cowherd, but he is no cow ard who looks after cows. Cowes has a regatta every year; yet the cow is not a nautical animal. It is not true that she steers with her udders. It is reported that the cow sat at the head of the table in the Ark (so say the ark-cow-ologists), because she was the only angn',ql that could calve. The cc w is a ouod mother, and w'il look calf-ter h-: calf. ,Cows rarely ride in carriages, but a flue calf haf -requently been seen de scending '-:'-:;n a tranmcar. Cos exit y metans of the oxygen in thi atw.l- s here .(I got this from a pac;iSos ait xord). By thie ow is the milk made. I know this because I hate often seen tie milkmaid by the cow. The cow has been introduced into song. There is an old song called "The Soldier'...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LUCERNE AS A SOIL RESTORER. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

LUCERNE AS A SOIL RESTORER. fMr. S. P. Keys, writing in "Hoard's Dairyman," says:-When we come to the question of the upkeep of the fer tility of our farms, we find that we face quite a serious problem. From what source are we to restore the humus, or vegetable matter, that is being rapidly exhausted by continu ous cropping? Manures and commercial fertilisers, while valuable, are not always obtain able. Farmers waste the barnyard manure, and feel that they cannot af ford to buy commercial fertilisers. To fill the bill there must be something within easy access of every farm. The answer to this is-green manures. The king of legumes used in green manuring is lucerne. Not only does it answer every requirement of a green manure. but is is also one of the most valuable of the standard crops. You may be cropping a given piece of land to lucerne, obtaining each year from five to seven cuttings, and at the same time you have at hand the means of restoring the fertility of the soil upon whic...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

ASSAURINE DOO LYB, 1ESTD. 178~, FIRE. APOODl NT. EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY ? . : .PAID EXCEED x85,000,000. s by BUSH FIRES en6 by LICHTHINC re mado good by this Company, AGENTS WANTED S '" 461 To 471 BOURKE ST., : . MELBOURNE. " LQOETY A CO, LTD,. ACDMTS. Anonymous. *;.: . ell-known author, on leaving :ý ;-?-' ::use one morning, forgot a let :Fr t?:t he had intended to post. Dur ving .t-a afternoon something recalled a. s mind, and as it was of con tidck:. ale importance he immediately _uarrd; home. '-The letter was no '-L~hr to be found, and he summoned t ah. :'-aid. S"-:ve you seen a letter lying S s, sir." `' " V' Whiere is it?" ' "Posted, sir." ' 'csted! Why, there'o wasn't any Amn'- or address on tne envelope!" know there wa~mnt, sir; but I u.liht it must us in answer to one -.oiL >-,em anonymous letters you' e v:., getting lately!" Prentice-at., East St. Kilda. 0 eplJLel.r -. 1913. . .' -rin,-1, a mother Ut eleven clu -"-.roi writs to ilaiy IL pusol ue nard-worti mt IsorLUorers ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OSTRICH PLUMES IN JARS. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

CSTRICH PLUMES IN JARS, "There Is no place like a pawnshop for picking up useful hints," said the improvident :nan. "Every time my circumstances compel me to patronise one I glean sonic item of general in formation that almost reconciles me to the necessity of being there. Ou my last visit I saw a man redeeming ostrich feathers. Our uncle brought them out tightly sealed in a glass iar. "'What did you "can" them for? the man asked. "'So they wouldn't spoil,' said the pawnbroker. 'A slass aijr is the safest thing on eath to keep feathers in. Moths and dust cannot get at them. Besides, you can !cepn an eye on them easily, and any trouble that might have been breeding when the feathers were brought in can be discovered and nipped In the bud.' "That hint I consider worth going to a pawncnhop for The way things look now notbody belonging to me will ever have any ostrich plumes to take care of, but if we ever have any t shall know what to do with them." The following composition on men is ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOME NOTES. For Busy Housewives. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 9 January 1914

HOME NOTES. For Busy Housewives. Castor-oil will remove warts, even oblstinate ones. if it be well applied and a, frequently as possible. BeEtles can be exterminated from any room if the place they infest is sp"iuki:ed )vith ground borax mixect with con mon brown sugar. Wihen the flesh is bruised it should be bathel freely and at once with very ho water. This will prevent conges tion and the ugly discoloration. To keep the water fresh and sweei in vases of cut blowers, add to it a smail bit of sugar. This is successful even in the case of such blooms as wallflowers. .!1lk is very apt to burn and dam age the saucepan when put on to boil. 'rnis may be prevented by rinsing out th saucepan with cold water before putting in the milk. When polishing knives it is a good plan to 'hold the board to the lire a few minutes before beginning, as knives obtain a greater brilliancy on a warm board than on a cold one. Eggs covered with boiling water and allowed to stand for five miinutes are, lmore...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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