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Title: Australian, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 55,405 items from Australian, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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HOBART TOWN. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 2 December 1824

HOBART TOWN.       We have received Hobart Town Gazettes to the 19th instant inclusive. Their contents are not important. On Saturday, Nov. 13, pursuant to a special man- date, "a Commission of Information was instituted" before G. W. Gunning, J. P. and T. Young, Esq. the Commissioners, and the following Jurors: — Mr. J. C. Underwood, Mr. Andrew Bent,   Mr. E. H. Thomas, Mr. Bayles,               Mr. R. L. Murray, Mr. F. Schultze,   Mr. James Ogilvie, Mr. R. Barker,       Mr. George Lowe, Mr. C. Connolly, Mr. S. Whittaker, Mr. C. Thompson,     for the purpose of enquiring, what sum or sums of mo- ney, if any, was or were due to the Crown from Edw. Foord Bromley, Esq. J. P. late Naval Officer at Ho- bart Town, and Treasurer of the Colonial Revenue;   whe...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
To the Editor of the Australian. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 2 December 1824

To the Editor of the Australian. SIR,   On looking over the columns of your Paper, I could not help deprecating the assumptions made in favour of a certain class, whose names have been excluded from the lists of eligible jurors, as having a positive tendency to generate and keep alive feelings, which a humane policy would rather strive to suppress. Upon this principle it is, that the Report of the Commis- sioner deserves the utmost censure. But while I readi- ly agree, that the utmost delicacy ought to be observed towards the feelings of the class in question, still it must surely be obvious, that the principle acted upon in the selection of jurors is agreeable to established law and usage; and, that a deviation from this principle might be productive of pernicious effects. How much better, then, is it for the sake of public justice, that juries   should be formed of men of unexceptionable character, and against whom no legal objections can be stated ? If, ...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 2 December 1824

F. HUNT, Cabinet Manufactory, No. 13 Pitt- street, begs leave to inform his Friends and the Public     in general, that he has for sale Cabinet Furniture of superior     workmanship, and made of the best materials, consisting of   claw dining tables, cellaret sideboards, chests of drawers, tent   and portable bedsteads, washhand stands, tables, &c. &c.     N. B. Funerals performed. — An Apprentice wanted. WANTED IMMEDIATELY,             A RESPECTABLE middle-aged WOMAN, to take   charge of two children. None need apply but those who can give unexceptionable testimonials of character. Apply to Mrs. Redfern, at Campbell Field; or to Mrs. Erskine, Prince-   street, Sydney.             &...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 2 December 1824

A great desire has been manifested on the part of the public to ascertain what can or what is likely to be done in the jury Question. We thought it had been pretty generally understood that the Emancipists had resolved to enforce their claims, and obtain a restitu- tion of those rights of which they had been de-   prived by the arbitrary decision of those who know   nothing either about the law or the policy of the case. We on a former occasion stated that we should for- bear to make remarks on the question, as it would soon claim the attention of the Courts; and we have ac-         cordingly been silent. For the full information and satisfaction of our Readers, we announce, that the   Emancipists long ago entrusted their case to Counsel, who, on their parts, are only waiting for a suitable   opportunity to bring it forward. The delay which     has alread...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POLICE OFFICE (FRIDAY). [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 2 December 1824

POLICE OFFICE (Friday). James Douglas, late constable of the Carter's Barracks, and holding a ticket of leave, was convicted before the Magistrates of harbouring bush rangers upon his premises contiguous to Sydney. He was sentenced to be deprived of his ticket, and to be sent to Port Macquarie for the unexpired term of his original sentence. Two men, named Spring and Haynes, were brought before the Magistrates on suspicion of robbing the stores of Messrs. Icely and Hindson, of a bale of goods, containing 10 duck frocks, 8 pair of shoes, two blankets, 3 Flushing coats, 12 woollen caps, 8 check shirts, the property of Dr Reid. A watchman belong- ing to Mr. J. Underwood, while on duty on Thursday night, saw the prisoners pass him in George-street, each carrying a large   bundle; he threw off his coat and pursued them, and with the   assistance of Leech, a constable, took them into custody. Both of the prisoners had been in the employment of Mr. Hindson a short...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 9 December 1824

M: of COO Tons, commanded by CaptaiVi1P...Dixoni5|.fOM.uerIy - of the Venerable and Regalia), is'.daily exj-ec.tw|,;ah||;iivtt|,again- sail ' 'to En«!and in all January, or tiie, bijginiiing of.FqlJcunrv, '. Jiavirig (1-e greatc-r part of ^'er'carao'engngi'd.aiid.rearfy;-t(/.sliip. . For Vrcight or Passage'apply -to ljcrry-ar.d VyoUstp^craft. ? ; ^RR Ship PRINCESS 1^iAJlL0T^E,' C!aptaiV. J. Joseph lit vtb. ? will leave hereoii the iVtbinst. duf,ci-Q»r Flobait Town. For Freight or Passage app.lv to ihe'Coiuniaiid.er, on board ; or, to Raine and Ilahisay, Bbgli-street. vf ?.:-: -^^ 1 rw--IHE Good Ship MINEUy^^HptainJoiiNBE^I, jiL will leave this on or before t|ierrot)»,iJra:nujiry,;jTorvSl.^.CA.-i.. PORE. For* freight or passage, apply, tjo thp'.CoiunianOer^Qix ?board ; or, at the Counting-iious.e pf ;.Rgin,e. and Kainsay,;-Bligli- street. * ' .. - '. . ?? ' ? , ?'* '-'. ' V^!.-^.-.'--fK^KV^:: i-'^i'^ ??»'': M? -Teak -built Ship i\Taii^cs^qnp!air^Goc^^^Jnrtl\riV;Six hundred tons, is h...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POLICE OFFICE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 9 December 1824

POLICE OFFICE. THURSDAY.—E.Wiseman, M. Foster, & R. Yates, were charged   with breaking into the dwelling of William Fitzpatrick in Sussex- street, and stealing from thence one pair of sheets, one blanket   and a considerable quantity of wearing apparel. Fitzpatrick,     stated that on Tuesday night last, previous to retiring to rest, he fastened his windows securely with nails. On getting up early the following morning he found a pane of glass taken out of the window. He immediately discovered that he had been robbed of nearly every article of clothing belonging to himself, his wife, and children. Edward Blanchfield deposed, that he was directed by his master, Mr.Riley, to accompany two other servants in search of bush-rangers. A short distance beyond Elizabeth Town they discovered the prisoners asleep under a rock, and con- tiguous to them two bundles of wearing apparel, an iron pot, and a tinder box, &c. which, w...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 9 December 1824

GOVERNMENT AND GENERAL ORDERS. Colonial Secretary's Office, Dec. 8, 1824. THE GOVERNOR has been pleased to approve of the following Appointments:—       In the Town of Windsor— Edward Miller, per Baring (l) to to a constable in the room of Hilton, dismi0ssed for drunkenness. Appointment to bear date the 30th ult. For the Districts of Bathurst and Melville—John Brown (free) to be a constable in the room of O'Hara, dismissed for neglect of duty. In the District of Airds— Stephen Curran (free) to be a con- stable in the room of Winward, dismissed.   In the District of Upper Minto—Chistopher Lynch (free) to be a constable, in the room of Curran, removed to the District of Airds.   By His Excellency's Command, F. Goulburn, Colonial Secretary. COMMISSARIAT DEPARTMENT. Commissariat Ofifce, Sydney, 20th Oct. 1824V ROAD ANP CLEANING PARTIES.— Persons, desirous of Victualling the Road and Clearing Parties employed ov their^Estat...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOBART TOWN. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 9 December 1824

HOBART TOWN. THE SUPREME COURT, OF VAN DIEMEN's LAND.— Thomas Ryley, a settler, residing at Pitt-Water, was arraigned for the wilful murder of James Kearney, his assigned servant; and pleaded — Not Guilty. It appeared in evidence, that on the day Kearney was killed, the prisoner, and the prisoner's wife, were most disgracefully inebriated, — that some altercation arose between the prisoner and the deceased, who em- ployed violence, and that subsequently the prisoner   fired at him, avowedly in self-defence. The learned Judge therefore charged the Jury, commenting on all the most importment proofs, and legally fixing their amount. There were two questions for the Jury to decide ; first, had the deceased been killed by the pri- soner at the bar? and, if he had, was the act of putting him to death, murder; or was it excusable as   homicide in self defence, or se defendendo upon a sudden affray. If they should be of opinion, that it was the latter, they would a...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
To the Editor of the Australian. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 9 December 1824

To the Editor of the Australian. SIR,     Had the maxim de Mortuis nil nisi bonum been adopted by historians, the acts of the most execrable tyrants might have been concealed; the recollection of the crimes of a Nero, or a   Caligula, would have died with them, as well as the splendid and distinguished glories of an Alfred, or a Henri Quatre, and thus the greatest stimulant to virtue been annihilated, as well as the most formidable scourge to vice. These latter observations   have become manifest since the appearance of the "Australian."   The spirited and legitimate manner, which that publication has advocated the rights of the subject, and unmasked the designing views of self interested men, merits the praise of every honest man, and has induced me to submit to the public, through the medium of your patriotic Paper, a most flagrant, illegal, and unprovoked outrage, committed at my dwelling in Sydney, on Friday last.—...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
To the Editor of the Australian. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 9 December 1824

To the Editor of the Australian.         MR. EDITOR,                             I am sorry to have occasion to accuse your police reporter of a defect, equally of candor and of feeling, in his statement of certain transactions connected with my name, which took place before a bench of Magistrates, on the 29th ult. The irony con- veyed in the paragraph to which I allude, in your last number, may, by ignorance, be accounted wit; but, by impartial and   reflecting minds, it must be considered malignity. It brings home the fable of the boys and the frogs— sport to the former,   was torture to the latter.                 &amp...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 9 December 1824

IN THE SUPREME COURT of NEW SOUTH WALES Between James Chisholm, jun. Plaintiff, and George Penkerton, Defendant.           LET the above-named Plaintiff, or his Attorney,   together with all other the creditor or creditors of the above named Defendant, attend at the Court House, Castlereagh-street, Sydney, on Monday the thirteenth day of December next, at eleven o'clock in the forenoon, to shew cause why, upon it being   made to appear to the satisfaction of the Judge of the said Court, that the said Defendant is unable to pay twenty shillings in the pound to his said creditors, it shall not be lawful for the said Judge to declare the said Defendant insolvent, and to make such order or orders, from time to time, in the premises, as to the said Judge may seem just, according to the Act in such case made and pro- vided. Dated this 29th day of November, 1824.   W. C. Wentworth, Solic...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 9 December 1824

Every grievance to which Colonies are subject must sooner or later excite the attention of the Mother Country, and when it   does not spring from corruption at home, must inevitably be re- dressed. The dollar system like other abuses has had its day— the evil hour has long been put off — enquiry has been procras- tinated, and for a while stifled — but the voice of just complaint has at length prevailed. We are indebted to Mr. G Bennet for introducing the subject of the currency of this Colony to the no- tice of the House of Commons. Mr. Bennet in moving "for a return of the number of dollars imported into New South Wales in the years 1821, 1822, 1823," took the opportunity of making a few observations on the inconvenience and confusion which arose from the state of the currency in New South Wales. "In the early establishment of the Colony" he said "it was the practice among tradesmen to issue promissory notes for small sums. A practice was afterwards introduced of punch...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
To the Editor of the Australian. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 16 December 1824

To the Editor of the Australian.   SIR,     In a letter bearing date Dec. 4, signed J. Josephson, my con- duct in the performance of my duty to you, has been impugned unjustly; I respectfully solicit the indulgence of replying briefly to the charges of misrepresentation and malignity to- wards Mr. J. I cannot but express surprise that Mr. Josephson should have deemed it necessary to deny facts, which the Magistrates and all at the time present, were witness to; and, who I am confident, will acquit me of the charge of misrepresentation. And, on this point I am constrained to say, that the "discriminating feature" I     am stated to want, that of veracity — is certainly not one of the component parts of his epistle. Having no personal acquaint-   ance with Mr. J. it is not probable I should entertain malignancy towards him — a total stranger, and wantonly sport with his feel- ings. If the particular expressi...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
To the Editor of the Australian. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 16 December 1824

To the Editor of the Australian. SIR,   Some of your readers condemn the writer subscribing himself   in your last Newspaper A No-party Man, for continuing to agitate the jury question, seeing it will so soon be determined   in the Supreme Court. But, I perceive, more good than harm in a previous discussion of this question, if soberly carried on.   Public remarks excite the greater public attention, and the deeper the consideration given by all ranks to so momentous a question, the final decision of which is to render an immense majority of our householders forever honest or nefarious in the eyes and language of the law, the more useful to those who have to argue the question and decide thereon, and the more credita- ble to our feelings and understandings. The No-party Man assumes it to be "obvious" that the late   hasty exclusion of a certain class of householders from the Sheriff's jury list is agreeable to establis...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
To the Editor of the Australian. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 16 December 1824

To the Editor of the Australian. SIR,     The very agreeable information derived through the medium of your last Number, supersedes the necessity I had entertained   of advancing certain particulars illustrative of the view I had taken of the jury question in my letters of the 18th ult. and 25th ult. already before the public. In dismissing the subject, however, for the present, and I hope for ever, it may not be im- proper to glance at a communication which graced the columns of the Australian last week, signed, "A No-party Man." The writer seems anxious to usher himself into notice as a candid, liberal minded scribe, attached to no party! — a mere cursory view of his letter will, however, at once show that he is utterly ignorant of the subject he writes upon. The present, Sir, is a     critical juncture, and the colonists have been long enough ac- customed to listen and bow to the plausible absurdities of ig- &am...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
To the Editor of the Australian. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 16 December 1824

To the Editor of the Australian. SIR,         In your last week's paper, one of your correspondents desig- signating himself "A No-party Man," has, with an imposing appearance of candour, "deprecated the assumptions made in favour of a certain class, whose names have been excluded from the lists of eligible Jurors, as having a positive tendency to ge- nerate and keep alive feelings which a humane policy would rather strive to suppress;" and the only argument he has adduced,   if argument it can be called, is, that "if indiscriminate selec- tions had been made, the eligibility of many individuals might have been questioned." Your Correspondent forgets, or is willing to forget, that the eligibility of Jurors is at all times liable to be called in question; and that the right of challenge is the peculiar privelege of the prisoner. Indeed, the very fact that a certain class is excluded, would, I have little doubt, were the...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 16 December 1824

TIE AUSTRALIAN SYDNEY, DECEMBER 16, 1924.

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 16 December 1824

Upon the first view of an article which appeared in the columns of our contemporary last week, we de- cidedly resolved to maintain that dignified silence so much superior to a contest with a coarse adversary, to whose level one must descend to be understood by him. But reflecting that silence might be misconstrued by our Readers, and that our unwillingness to reply arose from fear or inability, we have vouchsafed to notice this impotent attack. We could wish to have reserved our fire, for a worthier antagonist—not to waste it on such a foe as he. We will for once, however, waive our superiority, as a gentleman sometimes stoops to thrash a dustman, when the fellow purposely bespatters him with the filth of his cart. But in entering the lists with such an adversary, we neither expect nor can we receive any other credit or gratification, than is to be derived from the chastisement of a ruffian. This elaborate nothing, the froth of a fortnight's pain- ful cogitation, — we have no wish t...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
To the Editor of the Australian. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian — 16 December 1824

To the Editor of the Australian. SIR, "I Pompey am, Pompey surnamed the big," would have been a better motto for Philalethes, than the one which he has adopted in your last Paper but one. It would have nicely suited the theatrical strut and grin with which he has endeavoured to puff himself off as a botanical connoisseur, and probably the abortion of which he is safely delivered might have passed for mere merriment with those who knew no better; but when he   seriously affirms, that bastard box, or indeed any kind of box, grows in this Colony, he not only firmly clinches his own igno- rance, but gives way to that lamentable petulance which seems to be the distinguishing characteristic of his party, and causes me, in doleful dumps to join the poet in his pious invocation. "Rise from thy shades! old Orpheus, with thy fiddle   To quell this row among the biped cattle!"   I am, &c. SLAP.       &amp...

Publication Title: Australian, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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