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Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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III [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 January 1915

III. Beatrice Grahame rose on Christ mas morning with a strange feeling of unrest for which she could not ac count. Th^ words of the Reverend Harold Truscott haunted her, and wondered if she had done well in refusing his offer of marriage. Ro mance had passed out of her life. Then her memory went back seven years, and her heart ached drearily. She attended the forenoon service at the church of which Mr. Truscott was the vicar. As she took her seat her eyes encountered a man who sat in half shadow on the left of the pul pit. The man was somewhat shabbi ly dressed, his face was thin and seamed, his dark hair mingled with grey. During the course of the ser vice she found her eyes travelling in this man's direction in spite of her self. The Reverend Harold Truscott as cended the pulpit for the sermon. Beatrice, in listening to him, won dered if this could be the same man with whom she had been in the habit of working. His face was transfigur ed, all signs of weakness had vanish ed, for ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HONOR THE BRAVE. Abraham Lincoln's Speech on a Battlefield. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 January 1915

HONOR THE BRAVE. Abraham Lincoln's Speech on a Battlefield. (We make no apologies for repro ducing the greatest memorial speech of modern times—President Abra ham Lincoln's address at the dedica tion of the soldiers' cemetery at Gettysburg in 1863. To-day the cir cumstances are different, but the sen timent is the same. We should all take Abraham Lincoln's words to heart. Let each of us highly resolve that our brave dead shall not have died in vain). Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth upon this con tinent a new nation, conceived in lib erty, and dedicated to the proposi tion that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation or any other nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a por tion of that field as a final resting place for those who here give their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper th...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Explanation. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 January 1915

The Explanation. "You are no gentleman," she wrote, > "if you think I said such a thing as she said you said I said I had said." "Dear gixl," he answered, "you must not th'ink I think you think you must he the kind of girl I think you must be if you said such a thing as you said she said I said you said you had said." It seems he knew she knew he knew she said just what she said she heard he had heard her friend had heard him say he had heard her say, but with intuitive feminine tact she accepted the apology. Friend (in London art Gallery): So they skied your picture, old chap? Painter: Fortunately! They evi dently recognised its value, and hung it beyond reach of the slashing mili tants, y'know! ? The world is too narrow for two fools a-quarrelling. A smile and a "thank you" for each courtesy shown will give us joy and win for us the esteem that cannot be purchased with silver or frold. "Well, Jones, did you have any luck on your hunting trip?" "Simply wretched! Didn't kill a th...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHEN WE ARE AT OUR BEST. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 January 1915

WHEN WE ARE AT OUR BEST. In the thoughts of every man the prime of his life is always a few years ahead, says a "Times" essay ist. Twelve looks forward to eight een, when he will he "grown up"; eighteen regards thirty as maturity, and everything beyond it as old-age. 'Thirty thinks thirty-five the prime, and forty-five a little sere and yellow. Forty-five is now and then seized with tinges of apprehension; young men begin to address him as "Mr." and charming girls seem unable to call him by his Christian name without the preface of "uncle"; hut he feels certain that he will not be at the top of his powers till he is fifty. So it goes on through the decades. The prime of life is always a little ahead. Few things are more pitiful (de clares the same writer) than the sur render of a man who uses his years as a pretext for spiritual isuicide, •who looks constantly back, bemoan ing the days when he, too, was young; who laps himself in selfish ness on the pretence that because he is old h...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
No Telling. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 January 1915

No Telling. It was visiting day at the prison, and an old lady was being shown around "by the governor. While at one cell she ventured to ask what the man was being punished for. "For stealing a piano," the gover nor told her. "And did you steal it?" asked the old lady, turning to the prisoner, sympathetically. "Yes, ma'am," replied the man, thinking she might be a person of in fluence who would interest herself in his behalf. "I'm sorry to say I did; but in a moment of weakness, lady." "A moment of weakness!" gasped the old lady. "Goodness gracious! What could you have done in a mo ment of strength?"

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PROPOSED TO FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 January 1915

I PROPOSED TO FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE. Probably the most unique old couple in the United Kingdom live at Dry-street, Langdon Hills, Essex. Mr. George Mihill, the husband, has served through the Crimean War and the Indian Mutiny, while his wife was also present during the war, and knew Miss Florence Nightingale in timately. The old couple celebrated their golden wedding a short time ago. In an interview, Mrs. Mihill told how, when travelling in the Crimea I when the war broke out, she fell ill with scarlet fever, and was nursed back to health by Miss Nightingale. "I recall," she says, "on one occa sion a corporal named Persill had been brought into the wards mortally wounded. Miss Nightingale took special interest in his case, as he con fided to her that he was the only sup port of a widowed mother. 'Oh, Miss Nightingale,' the man said one day, 'how I would like to marry you.' 'Get well, my man,' replied the nurse, 'and you shall.' Was it only to give him a fighting chance for life and ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ORIGIN OF THE SLIT SKIRT. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 January 1915

ORIGIN OF THE SLIT SKIRT. It will no doubt interest feminine readers to learn that the slit skirt is not exclusively a feature of latter day civilisation. It seems, indeed, to be, as some male critics have-suspect ed, a product of savagery. Where the idea originated is not quite certain. It has been variously attributed to Paris and New York. The discovery has now been made that this latest creation in female attire is in vogue I in places where civilisation is un | known—where no white women and J very few white .men have ever set foot, and most of those who have ven tured there have been killed and eat en. In a report to the Minister for Ex ternal Affairs regarding his recent ex pedition up the Fly River, in Papua, Judge Murray states that he visited parts of the territory which, so far as he was aware, had not previously been explored, and one of the most interesting of his discoveries was the fact that all the women in one of the tribes were wearing slit skirts. This style of ap...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Made History. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 January 1915

Made History^ "Say, waiter," said the traveller to the hotel attendant, "what kind of chicken do you call this?" "That's a Plymouth Rock, I be lieve," replied the waiter. "I'm glad it has some claim to historic mention," said the man. "I thought it was just an ordinary cob blestone."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Startled the Waiter. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 January 1915

Startled the Waiter. Old Poppercop didn't liice waiters. He couldn't have told you why, or what he disliked about tliem; all he knew was that he hated them. Some people are like fiat ahout policemen —but there's generally a reason for it. One day old P. entered a restaur ant where he was not known, and a waiter approached him before he had had time to study the menu with the seriousness it deserved. The waiter, smiling in that annoying way that waiters do, made a bad start by causing the old gentleman to jump by flicking a crumb that wasn't there off tlie table. He made the bad start by addressing Mr. Peppercop. "Good morning, sir! I have, sir, de villed kidneys, pigs' feet, and calves' brains." Old P. looked up. "Really!" said he. "And you look like it. I'll have some cold beef and boiled potatoes."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Stubbornness of Pat. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

Stubbornness of Pat. Patrick O'Rourke had the misfor tune one day of falling from the sec ond storey of a house just being com pleted. Mike Flaherty, the . foreman, saw him fall and immediately called an ambulance, which in due course of time arrived. The surgeon gave one glance toward the still form and said: "He's dead.'' Pat, who was coming to, heard him and, rising to a sitting posture, re plied: "You're a liar! I ain't!" Mike was standing close by, and took hold of Pat, gently saying: "Lay down, Pat, the doctor knows better."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Why the Pigs Were Excited. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

Why the Pigs Were Excited. A minister, spending a holiday in the North of Ireland, was out walk ing, and, feeling very thirsty, called at a farmhouse for a drink of milk. The farmer's wife gave him a large bowl of milk, an while he was quenching his thirst a number of pigs got around about him. The minister noticed that the pigs were very strange in their manner, so he said: "My good lady, why are the pigs so excited?" The farmer's wife replied: "Sure, it's no wonder they are ex cited, sir; it's their own little bowl you are drinking oyt of!"

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Did the Dog Know? [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

Did the Dog Know? One day recently a Chinaman was walking slowly up the street. It was a beautiful summer day, and as he walked leisurely along lie seemed to be enjoying himself thoroughly. Suddenly a door of one of the houses opened, and a savage bulldog rushed out, barking and snarling, and sprang at his pigtail. The Chinaman jumped to one side, very much frightened. A benevolent old gentleman who was passing, see ing the look of dismay and fright on his face, walked up to him, patted liim on the shoulder, and said, assur ingly: "There, there, friend! Don't be frightened. You know the proverb, 'A barking dog never bites.' " "Ah, yes," answered the Chinaman, "that all velly well. I knowee plo verb, and you knowee ploverb. But does the dog knowee ploverb?"

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
They Knew Him. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

They Knew Him. The visitor had been invited to ad dress the Sunday-school. "I am reminded, children," he said, "of the career of a boy who was once no larger than some of the little fel lows I see here before me. He play ed tru -nt when he was sent to school, went fishing every Sunday, ran away from home before he was ten years old, learned to drink, smoke, chew to bacco, play cards, and slip in under the canvas when the circus came j around. He went into bad company, J frequented livery stables and bar rooms, finally became a pick-pocket, then a forger, then a horse-thief, and one day, in a fit of drunken madness, he committed a cowardly murder. Children," he continued, impressive ly, "where do you think that boy is now ?" » "He stands before us!" guessed the children with one voice. j

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Ocular Demonstration. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

Ocular Demonstration. It was at a country school, where the poorer chidren of the cities are sent for a short while each summer to mix their education with the ad vantages of fresh air, that an arith metic lesson was being taken, and slates were being used. The teacher, observing a boy more than usually interested in his slate work, stole behind him, and saw that instead of doing his sums he was drawing something that resembled a bird—with four legs. "Whatever are you doing?" asked the teacher, angrily. "Drawin' a duck, sir," was the re ply "Ha! lia! ha!" laughed the teacher, thereby drawing the attention of the whole class to the work of art. "Have you ever seen a duck with four legs?" "Yes, sir," was the lad's prompt re ply, pointing to the slate. "There's one!" No man complains that his wife's mustard plasters are not as strong as those hie mother used to make.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Cycling and Motor Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

9 That oycle racing is booming in the United States is evident from the fact that some £20,000 was distributed in America during the past track-racing season. The Australian crack—A. Gonllet—leads the list of winnings, he having won about £1500, in addition to a considerable amount of appearance money, bonuses, etc. P. Kramer comes second on the list, whilst the Tasmanian champion, A. Grenda, won about £750. Another Australian, A. J. Clark, did not do as well as usual, but the fact that he receives a retaining fee of £500 puts him on his right side. Users of commercial motor lorries, vans, etc., will be interested to lnarn thai the Dunlop Rubber Co. has just issued a new solid rubber tyre list, based on the nevr standard sizes recently adopted by the English society of motor manufac turers. As only a range of six differeut sized rims are to be used in the future, it is now necessary that the owners of motor vehicles using solid tyres should acquaint themselves with the " old " and t...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

For children's backing cough at night, Woods' Great Peppermint Cure, Is Gd

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Jews and Wireless. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

The Jews and Wireless. This is a new Stock Exchange story regarding' an encounter between a I I Greek and a Jew, which deals with telegraphy. "Have you heard," said the Greek, "of the wonderful excavations at Ath ens?" "No," replied the Jew. "What about them?" "Oh," replied Dlmitricopolous, "at a distance of twenty yards they came across copper wire." "Well," said Levi, "what of it?" "Do you not see," answered the Greek, "that this proves that the an cient Greeks knew all about telegra phy?" The Jew pondered. "That," he re marked, "is not so wonderful as the excavations at Jerusalem. There, at thirty yards, they found nothing." "Well," said the Greek, "what is there in that?" "Oh," triumphed the Jew, "that proves that the ancient Jews knew all about wireless telegraphy."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Obituary. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

The funeral of little Oscar Mitchell Bennett, aged 1 year and 10 months, who died on Thursday of last week, took place on Saturday afternoon, when the remains were interred in the Linton Cemetery. The cortege was confined mainly to relatives, the younger members;, carrying the white coffin to the grave.. The Rev. R. L. Reed officiated. Mr( T. W. Kelson was the undertaker.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Skipton News. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

0 On Monday afternoon Edward Earles was driving a waggon-load of firewood to Skipton, and met with a series of mishaps. He got to Nat's dam, near Langi Willi, when the load caught firs, either through the brake firing or a spark from the driver's pipe igniting some stringy bark. Earles pulled up - and was getting a bucket of water to ex tinguish the fire ; but the blaze scorch ed and frightened the horses, and the team bolted in the direction of Skipton. The strong north wind caused the wood to blaze furiously, and during its pro gress the fiery chariot nearly caused several other conflagrations. Elders' waggon and teasa were, sifiged, a farmer namei "Henvy 'hate a Lag iu hia load ol manure ignited, and the fepca along the road caught fire in several places. When about a mile had been travelled one of the shaft horses became so badly burned that it fell, and pulled np the other four. Mr G. Bunston, who had lost a wheel of his cart in pulling out of the way, was the first on the spot...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
INVOCATION. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

INVOCATION. A touching and inspiring scene was witnessed on the road between Bou logne and Paris. The train, in which were two English cardinals—Car dinal-Archbishop Bourne and the Car dinal Abbot Gasquet—was stopped by chance just beside another train con I taining a regiment, a large number of the men wearing green. They were Irish Catholics. Stepping into the corridor and lean ing out of the window, the Cardinals, who were, easily distinguished by their dress, said together: "May God bless you, my children." In an in stant these young men showed the faith that was in them by dropping to their knees to receive the blessing. And the nation adds a fervent "Amen."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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