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Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Ban... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 10,195 items from Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
10,195 results
DEEP PLOUGHING FOR OATS. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

DEEP PLOUGHING FOR OATS. On the Iron Mountain railroad de monstration farm at Hope, Ark., oat land ploughed four inches deep yielded but 23 bushels to the acre, while the same land yielded 77 bushels to the acre. This increase results from the fact that deep ploughing afforded a better reservoir for soil water-, and i dry weather did not delay the growth. In the deeper ploughing a larger am ount of moisture came in contact with more soil particles and dissolved more plant food. There was also more space for root development, and the larger root development was enabled to se. cure more moisture and more plant food.

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MELBOURNE LETTER [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

MELBOURNE LETTER (From our Speoial Correspondent). This summer has brought more than the uual number of big fires in the city ancj suburbs. The losses repre sented by the disasters that have oc curred during the past *ow months make a staggering total. Flourishing business enterprises have encountered serious ^set-backs because insurance is never anything like adequate compen sation for the dislocation of operations in a live concern, which is asj bad aa the actual loss of goods, plant and buildings that go up in smoke, or remain a dole ful tribute to the devas'a ion of an element against which the most elabor ate precautions yet devised are by no meang efficient. That tlj.ere haa been e vast improvement in the methods of lire fighting, and the equipment and or ganisation of the metropolitan bri gades cannot be gainsaid. Outbreaks which have taken place reoently and which, although they have caused en ormous damage would, if opposed only by the forces and appliances at dis posal jus...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OF RURAL INTEREST [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

! OF RURAL INTEREST I (By "Rusticus.") Wheat is so much in evidence just now that it isi n accordance with the fitness of things that this column should be devoted to it this week. It is stacked in mountains at the railway stations in the centres of the cereal-pro ducing areas; it is taxing the spcoial facilities provided for its conveyance to the seaboard, and is creating bu?y scenes at the wharves. It is literally a golden stream that is to bring in le turn a stream of gold. But in the midst of the satisfaction that everybody must feel at the garner ing of the good harvest, the attention directed to how much better it nugtit have been is not out of place. It is in no spirit of complaint that this is emphasised. Nature has, this year> on the whole, been kind to us. Theie are, of course, some localities in whiol» conditions have not been as_ favorable as could be wished, but taking things "fuU and by" the season has been boun tiful". That our farmers have not all -or'i-veii a res...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LIFE IN PAPUA. SOME INTERESTING DETAILS. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

LIFE IN PAPUA. SOME INTERESTING DETAILS. £By E. H. Vroland, Survey Depart • meiit, Papua, formerly of Tio tqria.) Oil the niglit of October 16th last, 1 left Port Moresby, and, by moonlight took the road that runs eastward, through low grassy hills, to the foot of .the rugged Astrolabe ranges. Passing by a few cotton and sisal hemp plan tations I reached at daylight the new township of "Rouna," situated 17 miles from Port Moresby, by the side of the beautiful Yalake river. "Bouna" will be the terminus of the railway which is to be built from Port Moresby, in order to assist in the development of the Astrolabe copper fields, the princi pal mine in which "the Yalake" has been proved to contain millions of tons of high grade copper ore. . This mine, like many others in the district, is awaiting mora capital and the railway. Next morning the "carriers and the remainder ofj the party having arrived, •we took the road that leads to the top of Hombrom Bluff—a rugged mountain that.forms one...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NOT QUITE APPROPRIATE. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

NOT QUITE APPROPRIATE. Ha inlet Fitzshakespearc, the" author, producer and principal actor in the thrilling drama, "When Fierce Assas sins Sniffed His Gold; or, the Ven geance of the Plumber," met a friend in the Strand tho other evening. "Halloa, Fitzl" exclaimed tho latter. "I hear that you sacked tho whole of your orchestra last night." "Yes, silly asses!" exclaimed the great tra gedian. "They went and spoiled the best scene in the whole play." "Good- . ness me! Whatever for?" "Well, I told the leader to pick out appropriate ir-ic for each scene, and you know the thrilling passage where tho Judge condemns me to death?" "Yes, yes!" "When the Judge put on the black cap, the pack of idiots at once struck 'Where Did You Get That Hat ?' "

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TURF TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

(By "Flemington.") There could be no doubt of the stable's confidence in Wallalo. ' The plungers connected with the Wallace gelding put tlie money down as if there was no such thing a-s settling day to he •nsideivd. Wallalo pi'oved to a great extent worthy of tho support, but st i< fell a lictie .short of victory. It was surely Atova's turn to score. For some weeks the George Frederick gelding had been forced to put up with a series of minor places, and thus his victory on Saturday should not bo begrudged him, Atora has done his party some very good sjrvico in the past, and he has s-carcely yet reached the end of his tether. Further evidence that it pays to buy proved horses in full racing order wars forthcoming on Saturday, when Widdon won for the second time in his new owner's colors. Tho black gelding is evidently a very smart hurdler, as 1 e always seemed to have tho opposition s ' od up. True, the Majestic Nut rose at the last hurdle beside Widdon, bu'. this was only...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Farmers Should be Students. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

Farmers Should be Students. 9 It is a well known fact that noth ing stands still for any great length of time ; things either go forward •and improve, or go backwards and deteriorate. If a lawyer has ambition to become a better lawyer, he does not diminish his study of the law, but rather in creases it. If a doctor would attain to the highest pinnacle of his profes sion, he does not practice medicine as it was taught and practiced 100 years ago, but he reads and studies the new ideas as advanced by known leaders and experimenters of to-day. Carpenters, printers, stone-masons, miners, merchants—all have discarded old and out of date methods for new er and more economical ways in which to do their work. IS THE PARMER CARELESS ? Have we as farmers kept up the procession? Let. us investigate. Do men who wish to become farmers, in the great majority of cases, think it necessary to go through a prescribed course of study ? They do not. Do they read up the newest and best methods of agricu...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
INTRINSIC VALUE OF MANURE ON THE FARM. THE USES IT SERVES MAKE IT OF VAST ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

INTRINSIC VALUE OF MANURE | v ON THE FARM. THE USES IT SERVES MAKE IT OF VAST ECONOMIC IMPORT ANCE. [ It is imposible to accurately estimate j the full money value of farm manure. Its value as a fertiliser; that is, tlie money value of tho plant food that it adds to the soil, may easily be computed from a ohemlcal analysis. But through out the country, as a general rule, its value as & fertilise- requires much less "consideration that its other values. ItB effect upon the soil far transcends in value tho value of the plant food it adds to the soil. These other uses of farm manure are of prime importance to the producing capacity of most soils They have not been given enough con sideration, and as a result, the pro ducing capacity of these soils has not been made what it might easily have been made. Nearly all soils are seriously lacking in vegetable content. Vegetable growth uses up the vegetable oontent of the soil. After land has been suc cessfully cropped for a number of ...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XII. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

CHAPTER XII. The patience of Sir Peter had turn ed to impatience, and this had grown to the fury of exasperation. The names of Lord Chester and Mildred Moore were coupled together every where in London. If the shameless intimacy were not soon broken off, Sir Peter saw the crumbling of his hopes for Bdwina ; and not only that he saw before him an angry duke, and the loss of the prestige of that duke's friendship and business. Sir Peter felt in great measure respon sible for Lord Chester—accountable, to the duke for his moral and physi cal welfare. He could stand the scan dal no longer. The time for action had" come. ~ Sir Peter sat in his private office at the bank one afternoon in art unusu ally idle mood. He was waiting. A messenger entered. "Lord Chester to see you, Sir Peter," he said. "Ah ! Show his lordship' in." Sir Peter rose from his chair and took a few steps around the room. He was nerving himself for the com ing battle, which he felt would be a severe one. Lord Chester ha...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WALTZING ROUND. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

WALTZING ROUND. "Excuse me" he said to his fair partner, taking a bit of wool from the shoulder of her dress. The wool, however, seemed to be never ending, until he had wound a largje ball, which he,_ very embarrassingly hid in his Doc ket. Fair Partner (to mother next morn ing)—"It's a funny thing mother, but last night I put a woollen spencer < a'ler my dregs, $nd thia morning it j Ha,d completely disappeared."

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FARM. SUB-SOILING WITH EXPLOSIVES. SOME PRACTICAL HINTS ON THEIR USE. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

THE FARM. V SUB-SOILING WITH EXPLOSIVES. SOME PRACTICAL HINTS ON THEIR USE. It is well to realise that land is bought or leased according to its surface measurement, and if we can "•succeed in/ making1 the under-soils contribute a share towards the pro duction of better crops, we are add ing to the producing area of our farms in the most economical way possible. Land is getting very dear on the surface, and to get the best possible returns per acre we must, on all our stiffer soils or those; un derlaid by "hard-pan," break up tho sub-soils to allow the roots of tha plants a full range for root growth. Farming by dynamite has caught on in the United States, and is spread ing throughout Canada and Mexico like a prairie fire. It seems a strange way of making the ground bring forth its produce in plenty, but there is no getting away from the fact that it acts. Doubtless the man who tried the trick first and met with success was quite in the dark as to why it suc ceeded. It is a moot poi...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CROP ROTATION OP PERMANENT BENEFIT. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

CROP ROTATION OP PERMANENT BENEFIT. R. C. Doneghuc, Prof, of Agronomy, North Dakota Agricultural College. While all the causes of low yields of the small grains cannot be remov ed, practically all that are of imme diate importance can be controlled in large measure by a well-planned system of crop rotation. When crops are grown in rotation and proper tillage. methods are followed, they will suffer less from dry weather than when they are grown continuously. Crop rotation is usually of more im portance than the methods of tillage used in this respect, although both are important." In most rotations more roughage is produced than can be disposed of by the work stock on the farm. Heuce, more animals must be kept and more manure produced to return to the land to keep up the supply of organic matter. The organ ic matter in the soil may also be maintained by growing grasses and legumes, (clover, lucerne, peas), in the rotation. Inasmuch as not enough manure can be produced on a farm to ke...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MARKETS. WHEAT AND OTHER PRODUCE. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

? WHEAT AND OTHER PRODUCE. Wheat.—The market has been steady at 3/5 J to 3/6, and a fair business has been done at 3/6 for parcels. Flour.—A small business has been done for export. The association price for new flour is £8/10/ delivered. Bran and Pollard.—The association price for bran is £4/10/ delivered, and that for pollard £4/15/. Barley.—Really prime Chevalier mal ting is quoted at 3/6, while a parcel a little below tliis^ class lias realised 3/4. Prime Duckbill is quoted at 3/3 to 3/4. Cape Jiialti/ig is quoted at 2/2 to 2/2.}, with business at tlio fonnor figure; while medium Cape ranges from 2/ up wards. Oats.—Prime ^Algerian milling are quoted at 1/9^ ex store for rail. A fair parcel of heavy feed has been sold ■ or shipment to Now South Wales ao 1/9} f.o.b. The spot quotation for feed ranges from }/7-} to 1/8} ex store or rail according to quality. Maize.—Good to prime flat rod is quoted at 4/ to 4/1 <>x store. Peas.—Duns are nominally quoted at n n to 4/9. ...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE MODERN MACHIAVELLI. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

j THE. MODERN MACHIAVELLI. "But why won't you buy something off my stall?" remarked the • pretty girfr at a oharity bazaar. "Oh," answered the mg,n, "I only buy from the plain girls. They have a harder time making sales you know. It was a brilliant reply and served its author nobly all the afternoon.

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FLY CATECHISM. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

FLY CATECHISM. WJiere is tlie fly born?—lii manure and filth. Where does the fly live? — In all kinds of filth and he carries filth on his feet and wings. Where does the fly go when he leaves the manure pile and the spittoon ?—Jae goe.'3 into the kitchen, the dining-room and the store. What does the fly do there? — He walks on the bread, fruit, and veget ables ; he wipes his feet on the butter and he bathes in the milk. Does the fly visit patients sick with consumption, typhoid lever, and ohol era infantum? He does, and he may call on you next, carrying the infection of these diseases. What diseases does the fly carry? i'.vphoid fever, consumption, diarrhoea) diseases, diphtheria, scarlet fever, and in fact, any communicable disease. Row can the fly be prevented?—By destroying all the filth about your premises; screen the privy vault, cover the manure bin, burn all waste mat ter, destroy your garbage, screen your house. Either- man must kill the fly or the fly will kill man. Prevent...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
COOKED OR UNCOOKED FOOD FOR PIGS. WHICH IS BEST? [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

COOKED OR UNCOOKED FOOD FOR PIGS. WHICH IS BEST? The economic value of cooking food lor pigs is frequently discussed, and upon the point divergent views ex pressed. An interesting experiment upon tlie subject has been conducted by one of the agricultural higb schools in Wales, and the results there obtain ed go to indicate that there is a slight pro tit in favour of cooking food. six pigs wuie used m the experiment, be ing of tlie large Yorkshire and -tiers Shire cross. They were fifteen weeks old at the beginning. The ration given to lot one was lb boiled potatoes, lb barley meal; and to lot two tlie same quantities, only the potatoes were raw. The potatoes were boiled in sulhcient quantity to last a weeK, and were supplied cold, whereas the potatoes in the case of the second ra tion were pulped alter being thorough ly washed. The potatoes and meal were mixed with water and then sup plied to the pigs. The total gain 111 the case ol the lot which had the boil ed potatoes was 1 cwt 9...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WOMEN'S INTERESTS [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

WOMEN'S INTERESTS (By "Ainbrosine.") oumetinies hats in the window look better to the observer tnan wlien tnod on. The window drtsser, knowing his business, sees that the setting suits On a paie grey-green buck ground, per haps lie will show the hats in tints oi yellow, pink and blue. Then prob ably he will use a largo black hat wnh black plumes and two white hats, and keep tli© yellows near the black, and the pinks and blues near tlio whites, in displaying his dress goods, he will be equally wise—fabrics oi delicate bluish greys or tints oi blue against ivory wnite, into which perhaps He has introduced an occasional note of orange. rlis iabrics of dark blue, sucii as indigo he will have against a background oi medium blue grey with an occasional note of Lndian red. Again, fabrics in the various browns, from yellow through red to black against a grey green background contrasted, perhaps with an occasional note of green. Fi nally, fabrics in tints of yellowish white against a light b...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE HAND SEPARATOR. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

THE HAND SEPARATOR, The value of a hand separator de pends very largely upon the person who runs it and cares for the cream. There is no question but what the separator has its advantages, but in the hands • t a careless person it very soon beccnes a detriment. Most of the stvida <1 machines are made to run easily, and almost as smoothly as a sewing ma chine, but how many after being used a while turn like a feed chopper, and, for noise, a thrashing machine is not in it. The * rouble is generally ura,.^ ablrf tc incleaii conditions of tlio gear ing and lack of oil. Not that oil is not used, but the oil holes and chan nels become clogged up and the oil cannot reach the gearing. On§ of tlio first things a farmer should do after buying a separator is to get per fectly familiar with every part of the gearing. This is as important to un dei'stand as the bowl. Milk very often gets into the gearing, and this always causes trouble till removed. Watch this, and keep the gearing ab...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HE AIMED TOO HIGH. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

HE AIMED TOO HIGH. Au inspector visiting a country school was much worried by the noise of the scholars in the next room. At last, unable to bear it any longer, he opened the door and burst upon the class. Seeing one boy taller than the others talking a great deal, he caught him by the collar, carried hira to his civil room, and planted him 111 the chah', saying, "Now, sit there ami be quiet!" Ton minutes later a small head appeared round the door, and a meek little voice said: "Please, sir, you've got our teacher."

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TRULY RURAL. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 29 January 1914

TRULY RURAL. ieacher (to scholars)—"Why does scandal circulate so quickly in this village?" Sharp Scholar—"Because potatoes have eyes, wheat has ears, and beans tallr "

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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