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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE GUYED GUIDE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

    THE GUYED GUIDE.     The guide was guiding a guy. As the guide   guided the guy, the guided guyed the guy until   the guy would no longer be guyed by a guide   whom he had hired not to guy him but to guide. So the guyed guy guyed the guide. No wonder everyone guyed the guyed guide guiding a guyed   guy.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WAS IT A PLOT? TO MURDER EUROPEANS. A FIJIAN INCIDENT. The "Polynesian Gazette," published at Levuka Fiji) on the 23rd of November, has the following:— [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

WAS IT A PLOT?   TO MURDER EUROPEANS.     A FIJIAN INCIDENT.   The "Polynesian Gazette," published at Levuka     (Fiji) on the 23rd of November, has the follow-     ing:—     "The little launch Adi Cakobau returning post- haste to Levuka from Suva after an absence of 24 hours only from this port, caused some stir on Wednesday afternoon, more especially as the Adi Cakobau was letting off steam and whistling with the full power of its little lungs, winding up with three extra shrill and prolonged screams—a sure sign, said the cognoscenti, that she was the bearer of important news. So people crowded down the wharf, and there saw landed Captain May and a posse of native police sur- rounding two Fijian chiefs, who were at once hurried off to Totoga. With bated breath we were informed that conspiracy had been dis- covered, and, caught in the act, the two chiefs...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHEN IS A MAN DRUNK? A TEMPERANCE PROBLEM. AMERICAN DEFINITION OF INTOXICATION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

WHEN IS A MAN DRUNK?   A TEMPERANCE PROBLEM AMERICAN DEFINITION OF INTOXICATION. When is a man drunk? Even at this late day, this is apparently a point still unsettled. Judge Dewey and Judge Burke, of Boston (U.S.A.), have both recently con- fessed the difficulty in drawing a just line be- tween drunkenness and sobriety. Is the matter any more definitely understood in New York? The following interesting interviews may show: From a present judicial standpoint, the prob- lem is rather "When does an inebriate become a fit subject for restraint?" than to determine whether or not he is under the influence of strong drink. Mrs. Frances A. Westerfield, president of the local branch of the W.C.T. Union, thinks that a man is drunk when the system is affected by stimulant, in even the slightest degree. Her husband, on the contrary, believes it impossible to apply any hard and fast rule, citing the con- quest of a world-celebrated chess expert in a tournament by another proficient...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MEN AND LUCK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

  MEN AND LUCK.   This trusting to luck means a danger,   The result is quite sure to be sad.     What you've done, you wish that you hadn't;   What you've not done you'll wish that you   had. —"Washington Star."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE OPHIR'S FUTURE. HER RECORD ON THE IMPERIAL TOUR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

THE OPHIR'S FUTURE.     HER RECORD ON THE IMPERIAL   TOUR. The Ophir left Portsmouth for Tilbury Docks early in November, where the luxurious fittings specially introduced for the Royal tour were to be removed. The vessel will then be prepared for her ordi- nary employment as one of the Orient-Pacific Company's line of steamships running between England and Australia. According to the "Shipping Gazette," the Ophlr steamed no fewer than 37,000 miles, or one and a half times the circumference of the globe. Her average ocean speed was 15 knots, but on occa- sion she proceeded at a rate of between 17 and 18 knots. The vessel was twice dry-docked, once at Syd-   ney and again at Halifax, Nova Scotia, but the repairs necessary were unimportant. During the voyage the Ophir consumed a total of 14,200 tons of coal, all of which, save that taken on at St. Vincent, was obtained at the various ports of the Empire. Inclusive of their Royal High...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LONDON'S LORD MAYOR. HONORS AUSTRALIA. A TYPICAL COMMONWEALTH CAR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

LONDON'S LORD MAYOR. HONORS AUSTRALIA. A TYPICAL COMMONWEALTH CAR. London's Lord Mayor's show has a world-wide   significance. This year it is more particularly   interesting to Australia as for the first time a   symbolical car representing the Commonwealth was a feature of the procession. The Lord Mayor's new State coach, which he had specially prepared, was most striking in its design and treatment. Massive in its proportions, it was yet gracefully hung and mounted on "C"   springs. The colors chosen were dark blue and old gold, but the blue showed only here and there. Elsewhere it was simply a blaze of gold. On all the panels appears the Lord Mayor's arms, those of the city, and also those of the City Guilds. The treatment of hammercloth and lamps was es-   pecially noteworthy—the latter being of solid brass, richly ornamented and chased. Dark blue figured silk was used for the upholstering of the interior, while t...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DO PLANTS THINK. SOME REMARKABLE THEORIES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

DO PLANTS THINK. SOME REMARKABLE THEORIES. Some remarkable theories with regard to the intelligence of plants have just been advanced by Dr. Thomas Gentry. Through the darkness of the earth, he says, the slender radicles of plants make their way. A stone impedes their progress—they turn to right or left before touching it, follows its outline round in almost a parallel course, but never touch. If a worm-burrow or some chink in the ground a few inches away offers a path which need not be forced, the radicle turns abruptly and seeks it out. How does this rootlet at once detect and avoid the stone; how conjecture the neighbouring but invisible crevice. If not by some sort of intelli- gence? There are flesh-eating plants—the droseras or sundews. Dr. Gentry says of them: That these plants manifest a comparatively high order of consciousness there can be no question. Try them with insects or rare bits of meat as articles of diet, and in a few hours, if rigorous leaves have been experiment...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE ROYAL TRAIN. A MUST LUXURIOUS AFFAIR. COST NEARLY £80,000. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

THE ROYAL TRAIN.   A MUST LUXURIOUS AFFAIR. COST NEARLY £80,000. The carriages in which the Duke and Duchess of York travelled on the Australian railways were luxurious in their way. But they cannot com- pare with the Royal train in which the King and Queen, with the returned travellers, journeyed from Portsmouth to Victoria Station. The train, which has recently undergone extensive altera- tions, is thus described:— Formerly the communicating saloons of the King and Queen were upholstered, the first in crimson velvet, the other in a rich blue of a like material. Now they are both of a uniform sage green morocco, selected, it is understood, by the Queen herself. His Majesty's compartment is much smaller than that of his illustrious Consort. A couch, a settee-like contrivance, a couple of chairs, and a small writing-table com- prise the furniture. The new electric heat- ing apparatus is a modest little stove, with a quar- tette of elongated globes or tubes, backed by a b...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW NIGHTMARE IS CAUSED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

HOW NIGHTMARE IS CAUSED. Sometimes nightmare to due to prolonged wake- fulness, a radical change in diet, or faulty posi- tion of the body, such as lying upon the back or face. Sometimes it to due to some mechanical interference, such as swollen tonsils. In nervous persons, emotional in character, nightmare may be caused by gruesome tales of woful spectacles, grief, discouragement, hatred, anger, and so forth. In fact, the most intense nightmare is due to exhalations of passion, due to the loss of dearly loved relatives or friends, sudden and extreme reverse of fortune, disappointed ambition, the fear of disease, or even a shock to one's self   love and esteem, which, as has been aptly said, slays more victims than love. The treatment of nightmare consists in awaken- ing the subject, and, if there is perturbation of mind, giving some mildly sedative potion, such as warm water, sweetened with syrup of lettuce. Following this, care should be taken to remove the supposed c...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Prince of Wales Arrested. KING EDWARD VII. ONCE FINED IN ILLINOIS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

Prince of Wales Arrested. KING EDWARD VII. ONCE FINED IN ILLINOIS. The visit to Canada of the present heir ap- parent to the British throne has served to recall many incidents connected with the American tour of the father of the Duke of Cornwall and York, King Edward VII. One of the most striking of these incidents was the arrest and fining of the young Prince of Wales, as he was then, for a violation of a Sunday law while on a hunting trip in Will County, near the village of Wilmington, Ill. He was arrested by Col. C. M. Hammond, an attorney, now in Salt Lake City, taken before Justice James L. Young, and fined three dollars. The Prince was under the guardianship of Lord Lyons, and the two made a hunting and fishing trip to Wilmington, some 50 miles south of Chicago, on the Kankakee River, a locality then visited by numerous hunters from Chicago, and Canada, on acrount of the plentifulness of game and fish. Col. Hammond was proprietor of a livery stable at Wilmington, and in such ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIVE MILES AN HOUR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIVE MILES AN HOUR. After describing in detail the car designed by a German firm, the Allegemeine Elektricitats Gesellschaft, "Traction and Transmission" gives particulars of the one designed by Messrs. Sie- mens and Halske; both cars are to run at above high speeds. Every means have been taken to secure perfect safety for the passengers. The actual running trials are announced to take place shortly on a military line near Berlin. In both cars the current supplied to the motors will be three-phase, high-tension current, step- ping down taking place in transformers carried in the cars.            

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LONDON'S FOUR SWORDS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

LONDON'S FOUR SWORDS. The Corporation of London possesses no fewer   than four swords. They are the "Pearl Sword,"   the "Sunday Sword," the "Mourning Sword,"   and the "Old Bailey Sword." The "Pearl Sword"   is so named on account of the inlaid pearl work   with which the scabbard is so beautifully em-   bellished; and this sword is the one which is tendered to the reigning Sovereign on entering the city, in token of alliance. It was this sword which was offered to the Queen on her visit to St. Paul's in the Diamond Jubilee year, and which was accepted by Her Majesty, and then duly returned. The blade is a fine specimen of old work, ornamented by more modern inlay in gold and blue, whilst the pommel and quillons are of chased silver, beautifully and richly gilt. This sword has been in the possession of the city for upwards of three hundred years, and has always been used as the chief sword of State. The "...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE ENGLISH BIRTH RATE. UNNECESSARY ALARM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

THE ENGLISH BIRTH RATE.       UNNECESSARY ALARM.   In a letter to "The London Times," Dr. Fre-   mantle, Dean of Ripon, has caused a shock to   English sentiment by pointing out with alarm   that the number of births in England is declin-   ing. In 1875 the children born in the United   Kingdom were 34 to each 1000 of the population;   in 1900 only 29. The Dean goes on to show   that at that rate there will ultimately be no   children born in England at all; the population   will first be arrested, then actually decline, and if he continue his estimate long enough, entirely   disappear.   This is a great deal like the Malthusian scare,   except in the opposite direction, says "Gunton's Magazine." The diminution, in the number of births per thousand of the population does not nec...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FRENCH MARRIAGE LAWS. AN ENGLISHWOMAN VICTIMISED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

FRENCH MARRIAGE LAWS. AN ENGLISHWOMAN VICTIMISED. The unpleasant possibilities that lie in a   marriage between a Frenchman and an English-   woman were once more illustrated in a case   which came before the First Civil Court in Paris   early in November.   In 1897 a young Frenchman named Leon Philip,   staying at Manchester, married a young lady of   respectable birth and irreproachable character   named Miss Helen Williams.   As soon as the father of the young man   learned of the union he left France for Man- chester, and told his son that as he had mar- ried without his knowledge or consent the mar- riage was irregular, and induced him to desert his wife and return to Paris. Miss Williams, who knew nothing of French legal requirements, married Mr. Philip in entire good faith, believing him to be a perfectly free agent in the matter; but it then trans...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THEATRICAL SENSATIONS. MOTOR CAR DRIVEN OVER A CLIFF IN THRILLING STYLE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

THEATRICAL SENSATIONS.     MOTOR CAR DRIVEN OVER A CLIFF IN   THRILLING STYLE.   After various experiments, the most novel effect in "The Great Millionaire," says the latest London papers, has been brought to a point at which the definition "sensational" may be justly used. In sight of the audience Denby Grant, the millionaire's secretary, who is flying with the cipher code which is to revolutionise their posi- tions, drives on with the motor, halts for re- pairs, picks up the escaped convict blacksmith whom he had "put away," and dashes off, closely pursued by Lord Deerwood in another automobile. Then, to the whirring throb of machinery and the warning cries of the fisher- men, the first car fails to round the corner of precipitous cliff path and plunges into the sea, where it blows up with the occupants en- gaged in a hand-to-hand encounter. It is really "frightfully thrilling," as Hilda Wangel complacently remarked when the Mast...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE GRAND DUKE AND DUCHESS OF HESSE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

THE GRAND DUKE AND DUCHESS OF HESSE. Rumors have been in circulation at Berlin re- garding trouble of a grave nature connected with the Grand Duke and Duchess of Hesse-Darmstadt. There is reason to believe that a dissolution of the marriage is impending. Since the 16th of   October the Grand Duchess has been living in Coburg with her mother, the widow of the late Duke Alfred, and she does not intend to return   to Darmstadt.   Negotiations have been proceeding between the Grand Duke and his brother-in-law, Prince Henry of Prussia, on the one side, and between the Hereditary Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenbnrg and the Kaiser on the other side. The Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg is married to the slstef of the Grand Duchess of Hesse-Darmstadt, and is Regent of Coburg-Gotha during the minority of the young Grand Duke. It will be remembered that the Grand Duchess of Hesse-Darmstadt two or three years ago was absent in Italy for a long period. Among othe...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Congo Barbarities. NATIVES SHOT IN HUNDREDS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

Congo Barbarities. NATIVES SHOT IN HUNDREDS. BY RUBBER HUNTERS. Public feeling has from time to time been shocked by revelations of the atrocious mas- sacre and torture of natives in the Congo Free State by Belgian officers and traders engaged in the rubber industry. That these abominations are still practised, in spite of denials by Belgian officials, is con- firmed by the statements of Mr. Edgar Canisius, an American, who was for five years in the em- ploy of the Congo Free State and of one of the concessionary rubber companies. Speaking re- cently to a representative of Reuter's Agency, Mr. Canisius said: "What can be expected of a system under which the natives receive the equivalent of one   penny per pound (paid in merchandise valued at   a hundred per cent. above invoice price) for rub- ber which fetches three shillings a pound in   Antwerp?   "The State cannot exist without rubber, and   the natives will not wo...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE BIG GALES. ON THE BRITISH COAST. LIFEBOAT DISASTER. NINE LIVES LOST. 44 FATHERLESS CHILDREN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

THE BIG GALES. ON THE BRITISH COAST. LIFEBOAT DISASTER. NINE LIVES LOST. 44 FATHERLESS CHILDREN. Few lifeboat crews round the British Isles   have become more famous for daring heroism,   and few have had a more splendid record of   life-saving than that of the little village of   Caister, near Yarmouth. In the gale of Novem- ber 14 this lifeboat was launched with great difficulty to succor a vessel in distress, and the following morning, when the men were within a few hundred yards of the mainland, after being afloat for several hours fighting the elements, their craft was overturned, and nine of their number lost their lives. One account states:— From the Norfolk village of Caister, long famous for the gallantry of its lifeboat crew, is reported one of the saddest disasters which has occurred on this part of the coast for many years. During the gale on the night of February 14 furious gale signals of distress were seen from this ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A WHOLE LOT AT ONCE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

A WHOLE LOT AT ONCE. Estella: "A lover is much more devoted than a husband." Murilla: "Yes, indeed; and, besides, one can have a whole lot of lovers at once.'"

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Fatal Kisses. DEATH IN LIPS. INTERESTING HISTORICAL INCIDENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

Fatal Kisses.     DEATH IN LIPS. INTERESTING HISTORICAL INCIDENTS. Kissing may be fatal. This is, of course, the   belief in a general way of many modern enthu-   siasts in the field of hygiene. At more or less   regular intervals the cry goes up that kissing is   barbarous and unnecessary, that a handshake   ought to satisfy every exigency of human affec-   tion, and that the poets ought to be deprived   of the chief stock in trade of the conventional   sonneteer.   These campaigns, however, are usually the   outgrowths of theory. There are facts, it now   appears, which adorn the tale with far more   startling emphasis.   It is not so many weeks ago that a Chicago   girl died from a kiss. Her lover had had an at-   tack of scarlet fever. While convalescent, she &a...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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