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Elephind.com contains 450,063 items from Sunday Mail, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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RADIO DETECTS NERVE CURRENT. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

RADIO DETECTS NEPVE CURRENT. The electric current ? .at shoots along a nerve fibre has been detected by means of a three-tube radio apparatus, accord ing to Dr. E. P. Adrian, of Cambridge University- It had long been known, he said, that the passing of messages down a nerve caused an electrical disturbance. But it had only been possible to record the effects fmm a large number of fibres at once, for exqmple, the thousands of fibres from an eye. or to a muscle. The results obtained were therefore as confused as would be the super-imposed record from all the te'egrapb. wires between London and Manchester. Dr. Adrian's new apparatus makes it possible for the first time to obtain records on a rapidly moving photographic plate of the impulses passing along a single fibre In conjunction with Dr. Zottermann, a Norwegian neurologist, Dr. Adrian re corded the results of stimulating a sense organ connected to the brain by a single fibre. The sense organs in the skin which give information as ...

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
THE PLOT THAT FAILED. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

THE PLOT THAT FAILED. Atkins gazed pleadingly into bis com manding officer's face. 'You are always on leave,' exclaimed the officer. 'What on earth do you require extra leave for now?' 'My sister's baby's goin' to be waxin ated,' replied Atkins. J 'And what has that to do with you?1* I 'She'd my sister, d'ye see, sir,' ex- 1 claimed Atkins. } 'What— the baby?' M No, sir. The baby's sister is my Drotner — i mean, im rue monger s oaoy —er— the father's my inpther— -no, I mean ? ' 'You mean ? ' broke in th* com manding officer, angrily. 'What do I they want you for? That's the point.' 'P-p-please. sir,' stammered Atkins, 'they want me to stand as godin motlier.' j

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
WHAT'S THE USE? [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

WHAT'S THE USE? The ambitious wife of a millionaire tanner was giving a dinner party, and in the course of the meal she noticed that her husband did not talk to any of their smart guests. After it was over and she had an opportunity she whispered to him angrily: 'Why don't you talk?' 'What's the good?' replied the mil lionaire, contemptuously. 'There ain't one of 'em as knows a thing about leather.'

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
DOUBTFUL VALUE. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

DOUBTFUL VALUE. 'I sent you an account of £5 for collection,' said a man, coming into the office of a lawyer. 'Yes, you did.' 'What success have you had?' 'Sued him last week, and got it.' 'That's good. Give me the money, and tell me the amount of your fees, and I'll pay you.' 'My fees are £10. I have given you credit for the £5 collected, pay me an other £5, and we'll be square.' 'What!' gasped the man. 'I don't see where I make anything by collecting the debt.' ''Nothing, my dear sir, from a money point of view, hut you have the satisfac tion of knowing that a dishonest man has been brought to justice.'

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
SO SIMPLE. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

SO SIMPLE. ? [ ,OId Mr. Spoffins was walking down the street wheii he observed a glitter ing silver coin' lying on the pavement. He stooped and picked it up and trans ferred it to his pocket. A rough-looking fellow, who was; walking a few yards behind and had seen the whole proceedings, began to wonder what the old man had picked up. Suddenly au idea struck him. Run: ning up to the old gentleman, lie tapped hina on the shoulder, and said: *'Eh, mister, that's my half-crown.' 'Oh,' eaid tlie other, 'you can have it with pleasure.' He put his hand into his pocket and withdrew the coin. Seeing that it wfta a two-shilling piece, he remarked: 'I'm sorry I haven't enough change, but take this, and I'll owe you sixpence.'

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
IN THE SMOKER GETTING EVEN. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

IN THE SMOKER GETTING EVEN. A young woman was asked by her father to buy some neckties. She thought she knew exactly what he wanted. She was sure she knew what she wanted him to have, and in any event she did not need the assistance of the salesman. i But the salesman had a great deal of advice to give, and he gave it iu a flinnanf. a trwrfwsivp mannpr. Finally the young woman was shown a line of gor geous purples. 'There,' said the assistant, 'I'm sirre he'll like one of tliosc. AU the young men like them.' The girl glanced at them indifferently and then at th young man, as if she saw him for the first time. 'Oh, he's not as young as you are,') she enid, 'He's a full-grown man.' |

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
COULDN'T BE HELPED. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

COULDN'T BE HELPED. The patient was describing his symp toms to the doctor. 'I'm -sure there's something very wrong with me,' he said. 'Whenever I lift by right hand to my forehead then raise it a few inches, and drop it down again to. my side, I suffer ex cruciating agony.' 'Why go through such a silly move ment?' asked the doctor. 'Well,' answered the patient, **i£ you can tell me of any other way of taking off my hat I shall be glad to hear it.'

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
A FAIR QUESTION. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

A FAIR QUESTION. 'I wonder,' said Legget, 'why old Tonilinsoii changed the name of his new bungalow?' 'Changed its name?7' repeated Ins friend. 'Surely not. He was rather proud of it, because he'd thought it out by himself. It was* called the 'Nat shell,' wasn*t it?' 'That's right.' said Legget; 'a*! the same, it's altered.' At this point a third man spoke. 'Tomlinson,' he said, 'got tired of that name because small boys used to ring the bell and ask if the 'kernel' was in.'

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
COMPLIMENTARY! [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

COMPLIMENTARY! A well-known actor who was touring the provinces had an amusing experi ence in a Midland town. His landlady and her husband had been very kind to him, and he asked them if they would care to see the show. Re ceiving a cautious affirmative* he gave them five shillings. Returning home after the performance, the actor asked the elderly pair how they had enjoyed the evening. 'Oh, fine, sir,' replied the landlady, 'only I hope you don't mind, but we had a fish supper and went to the pic tures instead.'

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
THE WHOLE STORY. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

THE WHOLE STORY. There was a knock at the minister's back door, and, as he opened it, he saw a little girl standing on the door step. 'What's your errand!' he asked kindly. 'Mother wants you and Mrs. Blank to come and spend the afternoon and stay to tea to-morrow,' she answered. ''Why, yes, we should be glad to,' replied the minister. 'Do thank your mother for the invitation.'' 'Well,' added the little girl, 'mother said she must have you some time, and so she would to-morrow, and have it over with.'

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
WIRELESSED ECHOES OF THE TRUTH. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

WIRELESSED ECHOES OF THE TRUTH. Golf is a game of skill and patience. At the same time it is also a great strain on veracity. Four men were playing a match on a course iu which the ninth hole lay over a deep ravine. Three of them went in the ravine, but by a stroke of fortune the fourth cleared it and found himself almost on the green. The others inspected their respective lies, and two of them decided to give up the hole. The third said lie would go down and play out, and he did. 'How many strokes?' asked the others, when he reappeared. 'Three,' he answered shortly. 'The others you heard were echoes.'

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
THE PONTIAC "NEWEST OF SIXES" ITS SPECIAL FEATURES [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

THE PONTIAC — ♦ — '1NEWEST OF SIXES' ITS SPECIAL FEATURES The newly introduced Pontiac Six is the result of thTee years of experiment ing and tests by engineers of General Motors. With such ability and resources to foster it, there is no wondering at the excellent performance of this newest of '6izes.' With all types of engines available as fTi« hscia fni- t.l-« new -'.nr tfin 'sonare type' was chosen because of its adapt ability to a car of medium weight, giving it ample power to climb hills and over cbrne adverse road conditions. The term ' square' comes from the fact that the bore and stroke are practically equal — the bore being Sijn and the stroke 3Jin. This engine has a large cubie displacement, 186.50 cubic inches. The ofiieial S.A.E. and R.A.C. rating of this Pontiac Six engine is 25.35, although it has developed 36 h.p. at 2400 revolutions per minute — an aver age car speed of 49.6 miles per hour. This dynamometer reading was made in brake tests at the laboratory and prov i...

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
DON'T LEAVE LITTER [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

DON'T LEAVE , NLITTER Now that tne picnic season is swinging into vogue, it is seasonal to refer to the practice of some people — not only motorists — of de filing Beauty spots with litter. It is difficult to comprehend the mental processes of picnickers who, having selected a desirable site for an alfresco meaL are content to leave the ground scattered 'with wrapper papers, empty preserve tins, vermin attracting crusts of bread, and pieces of meat. And yet la their homes these people probably would scorn to leave a refuse tray in the kitchen sink oversight. Away from home they 'turn native.' It is only common decency to leave a picnic spot as clean as you find it.

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
CORRESPONDENCE INQUIRERS PLEASE NOTE [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

CORRESPONDENCE INQUIRERS PLEASE NOTE (Answered by Mr. A. 1. LEAVER, A.M.I.E., Aust.. F.M. S.A.E.) Correspondents are invited to be explicit wftan describing their motor troubles, quot ing make, year, and model of their car. The name and address of the inquirer must bs given, tbouqh not for publication. A nom-de-ptume may be used. Queries con cerning oars, stationary engines, er motor boats are interesting. If «* sufficient gene ral interest they inform other users of com bustion engines. Replies are given to all questions reaching this office by Thursday afternoon.

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
FAULTY CONTACT POINTS. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

FAULTY CONTACT POINTS. 'Stalled' writes: — I have a four cylinder model, which has been two years on the road, speedometer showing now 9500 miles. It has given excellent service until quite recently, when a pecu liar hesitation started when the car was pulling on a hill. This tronble, I do not mind admitting, has me beaten. X have tried everything I carf think of without effecting a cure. I have had the carburettor down and cleaned same, cleaned petrol line, emptied petrol tank and given it a thorough cleaning. Cleaned cylinder heads, fitted four new valves and ground them in, set all tap pets. All four compressions are good. I have tried the coil by snapping the timer points with the switch on, and the ends of the high tension leads held |in away from the engine, and get a good spark. The battery is almost new, and aU of the wiring is in good con dition, all connections being tight and clean, and I have fitted four new spark ing plugs, with gaps set to 30-1000ths. I shall be extrem...

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
TRAFFIC CONDITIONS MR. H. I. JOHNSON'S VIEWS [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

TRAFFIC CONDITIONS ? * ? MR. H. I. JOHNSON'S VIEWS Mr. H. I. Johnson, secretary of the New South Wales branch of the Na tional Eoads and Motoring Associa tion, who has just returned from a world tour, states that he was par ticularly struck by the methods of traffic control in London and the other bijr busy cities, as contra :ted with the schemes in operation in New York -*nd elsewhere in the United States. He pays a tribute to the comparative excellence of the traffic control in Syd ney, and declares that his close ob servation has convinced him that per sonal control by the traffic police, as distinct from mechanical methods, un doubtedly is tlie better. Mr. Johnson went over 6000 miles of English roads, of whieh ho speaks with enthusiasm. He also tells of the wonderfully good arterial ronds in America; but points out that the sec ondgT.v roads are little better — or worse1 — than our own. Having been received as a guest by the world's 'eadin?: motoring organisations, and nprmitte...

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
£40,000,000 FOR ROADS. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

£40,000,000 FOR ROADS. Srieakinff at a banquet at Llandrinod Wells recently Sir Henry Maybury stated that something like £40.000,000 would be spent upon the highways of England in the present financial year. He believed there would be available durinn the satn-5 period something like f^KO.OOO for the mainteisaTiee and im n»T-?mi?nt of rural TnaJs alone.

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
THE CRANK CASE NO PLACE FOR WATER [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

THE CRAP5K CASE ♦ ? NO PLACE FOR WATER The cranfecase of an automobile is no place for water, as it interferes with the oil circulating system, par ticularly in winter, and, when present in the vapour form, it condenses on the working parts under certain condi tions and causes corrosion. The pres ence of some tinburned fuel in the oil is not an unmitigated tvil, as it un doubtedly assists materially in giving easy 6tartmg in winter, but neverthe less it is desirable that the amount of dilution be controlled. To get rid of water and fuel present in the cranfecase in vapour form a number of car makers are now pro viding positive crankcase ventilation, use being made in most cases of the vacuum in the intake manifold. By removing these vapours the possi bility of their condensing within the engine and causing trouble is elimina ted. For each pound of gasoline burned in an engine nearly 1.51b of water is produced, most of which passes out of the exhaust valves. How ever, a certain amoun...

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
COMPRESSED AIR USE IN CAR WASHING [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

COMPRESSED AIR USE IN CAR WASHING -Now that compressed air is beifie used for painting and tyre inflation, it will not be long before every garage worthy of the name will be compelled to have an installation. The latest develop ment in the way of 'mist' car washing should bring the day. nearer' stilL This new system makes for speed, and the fact that the compressed air is depended upon for penetrative effect in the shifting of mod, etc, instead of depending simply on .the force of water, makes for great economy in the use of the liquid. Fur then the job is done more expeditiously and better. Xts success may be tne forerunner oi the more elaborate American system where, in addition to compressed air there are a hot water supply and a mix ing tank for the incorporation of cleansing materials, so that the largest and dirties* ear can be tackled and completed while you wait. If the interior does not require attention, it is quite possible to have the job done ana be on the road again in...

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
The Sunday Mail Special Motor Number LONG SERVICE PENSIONS FOR CARS [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Mail — 3 October 1926

? ~ ? -^?« ? ? ? ?? — - — ? ?»????!- ? -^^- ? ^^- ^_ ^ ? ^ ? ^^^ ? 1'.. _ . ? . . ? ? ? ^ ? » ? ^^^^^^. ? ~ ? ^ ? *nnn nfifMMMiiir^^^ ? ^-^ ? . l ? LONG SERVICE PENSIONS FOR CARS There fcave been many instances in times past of horsemen who have pen sioned off a favourite mount after years of faithful service. Carriages which be longed to royal or famous dead can be seen in museums, sueh as the imposing collection of richly decorated imperial coaches in the former palace of Sclioen brunn, outside Vienna. Bat the motor ear is too recent per haps to have gathered the romantic as sociations of the old horse-drawn vehicle, and one does not thinfe of it as possess ing the personality of th« horse. Yet otner pieces of power-driven mechanism sueh as ships have separate individuali ties, as any sailor will telL There is the authority of Eudyard Kipling for the tremors and the clumsy start, and then the ultimate eheerful confidence, of the new railway engine on her first trip oqt of the yard...

Publication Title: Sunday Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Brisbane, Australia (Qld)
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