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Elephind.com contains 21,400 items from Rochester Express, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Unto the Third & Fourth Generation. [?]TER XIX. T[?] [?]tory of ROSS. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

Unto the Third & Fourth Generation. orie Weatherly. 'TBR XIX. Ti < iory of R06S. .Roes straightened himself in the saddle, sitting black and statue-like against ihe gold of the evening sky. He was watching the lithe figure of Alf Hamilton as he turned the last bullock, and perhaps unconsciously en joying the peace of Nature', broken only as it was by the report of a stock •whip echoing over "Roslyn" slopes. Suddenly a low roar came from the lately vanquished herd, and a great roan buil, followed by the rest of the mob, charged full at the open gate. Ross's 'Whip dropped from his arm to his hand, but he sat still. The lad had dashed up the hill, and well-nigh before his horse stopped he was on the ground standing right in the face of the cattle. Out came the lash, once, twice, ihree times, before the leader fell, bellowing, back amongst his fellows, and Alf bent coolly to lift the fallen gate to its hinges. Ross hid a smile as he flung himself from his saddle to le...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XX. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

CHAPTER XX. On the 'back verandah Mabel Clark was peeling apples. She had found a shady corner behind_ a shrubby pep per, for the sun was really hot this morning, and down went the apples into the tin dish to the tune of the next Sunday's anthem. "Hello, Mab!" And Ella Lee put her head over the fence. , "Hello! I was just 'wanting you," and Mabel shook the apples from her lap and came over to the fence. "Is it true Alf Hamilton says he was there with Leslie when it happened?" "That's just what I was going to ask you," returned Ella. "Frank Wiilson told us Alf had seen Mr. Hope and explained it all last night. They all believe him, too, but I don't 'blame anyone for "believing .it was Lennox," added she, doggedly. "Oh, here's Es ther! Bother her!" "Why, she'll be able to tell us. all about it," said Mabel. "Oh, no; I can't wait. I must be off. Our rooster's gone down to Mrs. Wilson's." "Good morning, girls." Esther stroll ed into the back yard with the air of one who had a right to '...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XXI. The Sunrise. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

CHAPTER XXI. The Sunrise. The first glow of dawn had just touched the eastern sky when Laura slipped out into the garden. . She wanted to be alone in the great sym pathetic heart of Nature on this the rst morning of her greatest happi ness. All Nature was waking to this day of all days. In the orchard, alm ond-treeB stood white, with enow blooms, and a stray daffodil put up its fairy head to welcome her. But it was out into the open fields beyond that Laura 'went, where the great gum-trees and clumps of wattle, newly-crowned with their spring glory, had their 'way. She found a fallen log and sat down to watch the 6unrise. A lamb bleated, a cow lowered in the distance, and a thrush in a neighbor ing wat.tle echoed a plaintive sweet note. Laura suddenly sat up. Another sound had reached her ears. A quick firm footstep was coming through the timber towards her. The next second a pair of brown hands were laid on the fence, and Richard leaped over "Laura!" "Dick!" Her voice came to him t...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A WEIRD PROCESSION. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

A WEIRD PROCESSION. Five hundred snake-charmers, sounding weird notes on their pipes, formed the unusual yet picturesque procession that followed to his grave Katch Sarak, a man of big renown in - l'is business, who died in terrible agony as the result of a cobra bito received while practising his profes sion in the neighborhood of Garden Reach, India." "Guru," or god, he had become dub bed by the people amongst whom ho lived, such was his influence over poisonous reptiles. His services were sought recently by a neighbor who had missed many fowls from his com pound. Going at dusk one day, the snake-charmer discovered a cobra of unusual size amongst the birds, so formidable, in fact, that he postponed his attempt to capture it until day light, when he was successful in se curing it. Instead of dispatching the snake at once, he took it to the local bazaar for the edification of the natives. On attempting to extract its fangs, the cobra wriggled free and darted at its captor, who was b...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Knew Him Well. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

Knew Him Well. It was a contested will case, and one of the witnesses, in the course of giving evidence, described the tes tator minutely. "Now, sir," said counsel for the da fence, "I suppose we may take it, from the flattering description you have given of the testator, his good points, and his personal appearanco generally, that you were intimately acquainted with him?" "Him!" exclaimed the witness. "He was no acquaintance of mine!" "Indeed! Well, then, you must have observed him very carefully whenever you saw him?" pursued counsel. "I never saw him in my life," was the reply. "Now, now, don't trifle with the Court, please! How, I ask you, could you, in the name of goodness, de scribe him so minutely if you never saw him or never knew him?" "Well," replied the witness, and the smile which overspread his features extended to the faces of those in court, "you see, I married his widow."

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Presence of Mind. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

Presence of Mind. In front of his Clielsea (Eng.) house Sir Thomas More had a garden and gatehouse, and, as there was a pleas ant view from the summit of the gate house, he used frequently to sit there, accompanied only by his dog. Here it was that he was found one after noon by a wandering maniac, who crept, upstairs and saw the feeble old man dozing. "Leap, Tom, leap!" he cried, and at the same time tried to throw him over the battlements. More had not physical strength enough, to resist, but he had the wit to say: "Let us first throw this little dog over." The man immediately threw down the dog. "Pretty sport," said the Lord Chan cellor. "Now, go down and bring him up again." While the madman went down for the dog, More made fast the door be hind him, and so managed to hold the fort until deliverance came.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Avoiding Eye-Strain. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

Avoiding Eye-Straii Eye-strain is said to be largely a defect of civilisation. To counteract it, children should be encouraged to use their eyes at long range.. A teacher who has a surprisingly small amount ol' eye-strain among her pupils attri butes it to her practice of ranking the scholars drop their work at the end of each hour and look out of the win dow. There is a contest as to who can see the farthest. This rests and trains the eyes and teaches observa tion. A woman who does fine sewing for her living found her eyes strained and weak. She was advised to drop her sewing every half-hour and look for v minute into space. Relief was quick, and the eye-strain disappeared. Short-sighted people who hold their book or work close will ease eye strain and lengthen their vision if they frequently remove their glasses end look at some object 011 the hori zon. The long-distance training will not, however, relieve eye-strain that comes from astigmatism, reckless dis regard of the eyes, or...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Too Much for the Ghost. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

Too Much for the Ghost. Archbishop Thomson once '"laid" a ghost in a very simple way. Staying at a country house with traditions of a family ghost, he was put up for the night in the "haunted chamber." In the morning his hosts were anx ious to know if he had seen anything. "Oh, yes," he replied; "about twelve o'ciock I heard a knock at the door. I said, 'Come in, come in.'" "And did he come?" "Yes; an old sallow-looking man." "Yes, that is our ghost! What did you dq?" "I got out of bed and asked if he belonged to the house. He nodded as sent. I asked .him if he were a par ishioner. He nodded again. Then I said, 'I am anxious to build some new schools; ■will you give me a subscrip tion?' He disappeared and I saw him no more!" The teacher was addressing his pu pils on the subjects of laziness and idleness. He drew a terrible picture of the habitual loafer—the man who dis likes work. and who 'begs for all he gets. "Now, John," said the teacher to a little boy iwho had been very inatten...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Too True. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

i oo True. There is a happy "mean in every thing. It is said that a shrewd old lady heard her married daughter say: "If my husband doesn't do such and such a thing, he'll find himself in hot water." "My child," said the old lady, "a man is like an egg. Kept in hot water a little while he may boil soft, but keep him there long and he hardens!"

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WIT AND HUMOR. The Colonel's Moral Sense. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

WIT AND HUMOR. The Colonel's Moral Sense. Apropos of a scandal in the New York Bar, Bishop Winston C. Ruther ford told the following story:— The morals of the New York Bar s.eem to he about like the morals of Colonel Byrne, no better and no worse. Colonel Byrne, a Kentackian, de fended a man for murder. It was tes tified that this man murdered a wo man on the night of August 20. Two or three witnesses saw the deed. It was committed under the milky light of a full moon. The witnesses were able to iden tify the defendant on account of the 'brilliance of the moonlight. The de fendant could not prove an alibi, and things looked pretty 'bad for him. But at this point Colonel Byrne pro duced an almanac showing that on the night in question there had beea no moon whatever. Thereupon a great laugh resounded through the court room, and the defendant was speadily acquitted. "Colonel," said the defendant, after wards, "how much do I owe you?" "You owe me," the Colonel answer ed, "five hundred ...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CRUSHING REBUKE. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

CRUSHING REBUKE. In the early days of railways, oil some of the lines smoking was not allowed at all, either in the U-ains or on the station buildings. One day a station-master of a large station, a man noted for his conceit and pomposity, descried a gentleman pacing the platform with a cigar in his mouth. He at once accosted the offender and requested him forthwith to stop smoking. The gentleman took no notice of this command, but con tinued to walk, emitting a silvery cloud. The station-master asked him to stop smoking more peremptorily than before; but still the owner' of the Havana maintained a provoking dis regard. A third time the order was repeated, accompanied with the threat that if the obstinate sinner did not obey lie would be handed over to the tender mercies of the porters. The stranger took no more heed than before, so at last the official, completely losing his temper, pulled the cigar out of the smoker's mouth and flung it away. This violent act produced 110 more eff...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CARE OF CREAM. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

CARE OF CREAM. For the factory manger to turn out a first-grade butter he requires the help of the farmer. The cream must be delivered in the best order pos sible. Cleanliness in the dairy is an essential condition. Cream cans are returned washed, but it is very neces sary that they should be thoroughly cleansed and scalded again at the farm before use. For segarating, a special room should be provided, at least 30 yards to windward of the milking shed, have a concrete floor, be provided with good drainage, well ventilated, and have a good supply of water. The milk should be separated as soon as possible, and while the animal heat is in the milk. The cream should at once be cooled to the lowest possible temperature; and, as the water required is small, this should present no serious difficulty. Under no circumstances should cream from one skimming be mixed with cream from another skimming unless it has first been well cooled. The most unsatisfactory of all suppliers is tlie man wlio...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A BERESFORD IN WAR-TIME. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

A BERESFORD IN WAR-TIME. The Beresfords have all been fa mous for the courage that borders ou recklessness. Lord William JJeres ford served in the Zulu War in liSTS), winning the V.C., a:id in his hook, •'Campaigns of a War Correspondent," Mr. Melton Prior relates somo striking stories of him: — In the retreat'Lord AVilliam Beres fcrd, turning around, saw the four legs of a ■white horse kicking in the air, Realising "at once that it belongecPto oiio of our men, he rode straight for it, and found that the horse had been shot and that the rider had fallen half stunned. "Get up!" Lord William said to the man, but he seemed to dazed to an swer; whereupon Lord William said, "If you don't get up at once I will jump down and punch your head!" —at which the man did rise slowly. Lord William succeeded in helping him on to the horse behind him; once mounted, the man clutched Beresford around the waist, and so they gallop ed off. All the time this was taking place the Zulus were firing from a ...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DAIRYING SUGGESTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

DAIRYING SUGGESTIONS. The following suggestions are the experience of Mr. W. M. Rider, of the Winona Agricultural College, U.S.A.: Test your iherd for economic produc tion. Weigh milk from each cow night and morning, one day each month. Take samples of each milking and test it for butter fat. Knowing the milk and fat given in one day, use these figures as an aver age day's production for the current month, and, 'by multiplying the milk and fat produced 'by the number of days in the month, you obtain the total amount of milk and butter fat (in pounds) produced for one month. Weigh feed fed on day of test, and from the cost of each feed figure the cost of feed fed each cow on day of test. From I he daily cost of feed per cow, compute the cost of her feed for one month. If the milk is sold as milk, compute the value of each cow's milk for the month at the market price received. Knowing the money value of each cow's milk for the mouth, and the cost of her feed, one can find the net valu...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Impure Air and Scrofula. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

Impure Air and Scrofula. Tlie atmosphere of all rooms should be frequently renewed by proper ven tilation. The best method of accom plishing this has been tor many years a subject closely studied by sanitar ians. m rooms," and especially in bed rooms, the fireplace should always be ieft unclosed. The windows should be pulled down from the top, and up from the bottom. All rooms, and es pecially sleeping apartments, should oe well aired during the day. Impure air in bedrooms is oonsiderd by emin ent medical authorities to be one of the most potent causes of consumption iin'd scrofula. A well-known French physician who has devoted much at tention to studies of this nature says: "It will often be found, on examina tion, that scrofulous diseases are caused by vitiated air, and it is not always necssary that there should have been a prolonged stay in such an atmosphere. Only a few hours each day is sufficient; and a person may live in a most healthy district, pass the greater part of each...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Mutual Secrets. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

Mutual Secrets. "I didn't want to come here in the first place," confided the first guest at the expensive hotel in a ■well-known winter holiday resort on the South Coast. "Na more did I," replied the second; "but my wife insisted on my coming." "So -did mine," said the first. "She said we had to come just tbecause the Smithsons were coming, although I simply told her we could not afford the expense." "And that's what I said," explained the second, "ibut my wife said we had to come because the Brownsons were coming." "Why, look here, my name is Brownson." "And mine is Smithson." Then the two men shook one an other warmly by the hand. Each high achievement is n sign and token of the whole nature's pos sibility. What a piece of the man was for that shining moment it is the duty of the whole man to 'be ^.ivays. He is the truly courageous man who never desponds.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IN FANNY BURNEY'S GARDEN. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

FANNY BURNEY'S GARDEN. An amusing account of the horti cultural pursuits—and ineptitude—of General d'Arblay, the French emigre who became Fanny Burney's hus band, is given 111 an article in me "Cornhili" by rfir Henry Lucy: — The young coupie began their mar ried life in apartments in a farm nouse oxi [he summit of Bagdeu riiil. i'hence they moved to a somewhat larger cottage at Bookliam. Finally, when "Camilla'' proved a financial success, they bunt themselves a nouss on the outskirts of Norbury ir"ark, known during their residence as "Camilla Cottage." From tne first, M. d'Arblay, con- j scious of inadequacy to bear his fair I share in the wherewithal for meeting j the cost of the little household, de veloped a fearsome frenzy for gar- J demng. Pursuit of the vacation in volved him in delightfully ludicrous I dilemmas. Writing unuer date April, ! XT94, from the cottage at._Bookham, J the young wife says:— I "Think of our horticultural shock I iast 'week when Mrs. Bailey, our land ...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PIGS FOR BACON. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

PIGS FOR BACON. Certain modifications in the meth ods of killing and preparing pigs for bacon have been necessary in recent years to meet the demands of the consumer and curer. Among these, has been the movement in favor' of less fat and more lean, what is pre ferred now being a tasty, mild-flavor ed, somewhat leas' bacon, which is finely streaked, with fat and of firm texture. It is occasionally .found in dealing with carcases for either pork or ba con that there exists an abnormal condition in the texture of fibre of the flesh. It is soft, yields to pres sure, is flabby, and possesses an un natural greasiness. This class of flesh invariably cures badly, and pro duces inferior bacon. Observation has taught that it is mainly due to the various classes of food being used in improper proportions. Further experience has shown that this influence is more pronounced dur ing winter. Low temperatures exert a change upon the. nature of the body fat. Animals exposed to cold are prone to prod...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHY IMPORT CITRUS FRUIT? [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

WHY IMPORT CITRUS FRUIT? Why, asks an expert, do we import citrus fruit from Italy? We nave conditions here favorable to the growing of first class fruit. We can produce citrus fruit here equal to what we receive from Italy, if pro per cultural methods are practised. The soil is here, and the climatic condition. The Italian fruit has a thin skin, the correct flavor, and its keeping quality is world-renowned. Vet some of our locally-produced oran ges will compare favorably with theirs, but to oust the imported ar ticles growers should endeavor to produce more of this class. The thin skinned varieties are just as easily grown as the inferior types, and, as far as flavor is concerned, many of our up-to-date growers produce fruit evei-y bit as good as that imported— better in fact, but the drawback is that we do not get enough, nor does it always combine with the commer cially-essential thin skin.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Heart of s Girl[?] (All Rights Reserved.) CHAPTER III.—Continued. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

By HENRY FARMER, Author of "'The Money-Lender,' QuiUry Street," "Bondage," (AH Rights Reserved.) CHAPTER III-—Continued. Queenie drew back a pace as Mi chael Thorne stepped into the gas-lit nsss&ti® without invitation. He was much better dressed than when he quitted the house four months hack. He was looking several rears" older. Perhaps it was the stress and strain of getting the better of his felloe-gamblers in the copper market, where fortunes were made and men went smash in a day. He had lost flesh, and the protrusion of his pow erful' lower jaw seemed more pro iiouuced, his eyes aeper sec ana meir expression more vague, more secret ive. He looked a vulgarian still. No one could have called him go-od-look ing. tills young-old man, who a few months back was merely regarded as a punctual, plodding clerk. Yet pretty, nineteen-year-old Beryl Price wor shipped him hopelessly—with the characteristic hopelessness of nine teen. Dogged strength was perhaps the secret of his fasci...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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