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Elephind.com contains 44,014 items from American Presbyterian, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

KUFFS CHOATE. In Parker's Reminiscences of Mr. Ohoate, just published, his manner of keeping accounts .and collecting bills is thus described: "I never remember seeing him collect any money, or make any charges in any books. Indeed, I never saw any account books in his office. He himself never seemed to have any money. If be wanted any, he would get me to draw a cheek for him, even for five dollars, and he signed it. If he drew the cheek himself, he made sad wor . k of it. It used to be said round the entry, that when he had to go to Washington to argue cases, or to Congress, he often was obliged to ransack the entry to find some one with money to lend him to go on with. Unlike some others of the fraternity of great men, however, he very often paid what he borrowed. His accounts of who owed him, and how much, he must have chiefly carried in his head. His office partner could not have known them, and there was not seen any book of original entries. One of his old students of f...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

""" EXTRAVAGANCE OF THE AGE . A shrewd writer, who is in the habit of telling home truths which go direct to the heart of the popular follies of the day, has the following in relation to the pernicious system of domestic education, so fatally prevalent at the present time: In the town of Somewhere lives Mr. Manygirls. He is a toilsome merchant,, his wife a hard-working housekeeper. Once they were poor, now they are ruinously rich. They have seven daughters, whom they train up in utter idleness. They spend much money, but not in works of humanity, not even in elegant accomplishments, in: painting, dancing, music, and the like, and so paying in spiritual beauty what they take in material means. They never read nor sing; they are know-nothings, and, only in vain show, as useless as a ghost, and as ignorant as the blocks on which their bonnets are made. Now, .these seven * ladies,' as the newspapers call the poor things, so ignorant and helpless, are not only idle, can earn nothing, b...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

_ -'r-_»wwvVVA1_VvVVWVVVVVV_> A SICK BED. 81f _WltLlAM CULL EN BRYANT. _tong hast thou watched my bed, And smoothed the pillow oft For this poor aching head, With touches kind and soft. Oh ( smooth it yet again, As softly as before; Once—only once, and then I need thy hand no more. Yet here I may not stay, Where I so long have lain, Through many a restless day And many a night of pain* But bear me gently forth Beneath the open sky, Where on the pleasant earth, Till night the sunbeams lie. There, through the coining (lays, I shall not look to thee My weary side to raise And shift it tenderly. There sweetly shall I sleep, Nor wilt thou need to bring And pat to my hot lip Cold water front the spring; Nor wet the kerchief laid Upon my burning brow; Nor from my eyelids shade The light that wounds them now; Nor watch that none shall tread, With noisy foptsteps, nigh ; Nor listen by my bed To hear the faintest sigh; _? And feign a look of cheer, . _jg _^ And words of comfort...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

WItfTEB SHOESi JMVji _Journal of Health gives the following _sensible advice: ''like the gnarled oak ,thai has _withstood the storms and thunderbolts of centuries, man himself begins to die at the extremities. Keep the feet dry arid warm, and we may snap our fingers in joyous triumph at disease; and the doctors. Put on two pairs of thick woollen stockings, but keep this to yourself; go to some honest son of St. Crispin, and have your-measure taken for a stout pair of winter boots or shoes; shoes are better for ordinary every-day use, as they allow the ready escape of the odours, while they strengthen the ankles, accustoming them to depend on themselves. A very sMg|f_* acciden_^JIs^^_ufficjent to cause a sprained ankle to an _haoTtual Boot-wearer. Besides, a shoe compresses less; and hence admits of a more vigorous circulation of blood. But wear boots when you ride or travel. Give _^directions also to have no cork or India-rubbers about the shoes, but to place between the layers ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

BEATJTIFirL EXTRACT. You cannot go into the meadow and pluck up a . single daisy by the roots, without breaking up a society of nice relations and detecting a principle more extensive and refined than mere gravitation. The _handful of earth that follows the finny roots of the little flower is replete with social elements. A little social circle has been formed around that _germinating daisy. The sun-beam and the dew-drdps«e(5_there > and the soft summer breeze came _jwh*|periog through the tall grass to join the silent concert. The earth took them to the daisy _gemj _jand all went to work to show that iower to the guja, Each mingled in the honey of its influence , and they nursed the " wee canny thing" with an a_'ilment that made it-grow* And when it lifted _itjs eyes toward the sk y they wove a soft carpet of grass for its feet; And the sub saw it through tne green leaves and smiled as he passed on; and, by starlight : and the: moonlight, they worked on. 'And the daisy lif...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

CURIOUS RBCIPE FOR SLEEP. There is a curious traditionary story current in some families, regarding a celebrated Scottish nobleman, which, 1 am assured, is true, and further, that it has never appeared in print. The story is therefore, a Scottish reminiscence, and as such, deserves a place here. The Earl of Lauderdale was so ill as to cause great alarm to his friends, and .perplexity to his physicians. One distressing symptom was a total absence of s,leep, and the medical men declared their opinion, that without sleep being induced he could not recover. His son, a queer, eccentric-looking boy, who was considered a kind of daft, and had little attention paid to his education, was sitting under the table, and cried out, " Send for that preaching man frae Livingstone, for he (the Earl) aye sleeps in the kirk." One of- the doctors thought this hint worth attendiug to. The experiment of " getting a minister till him" succeeded, and sleep coming on he recovered. The Earl, out of gratitu...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 12 January 1860

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 January 1860

IRVUIGKS RELIGIOUS CHARACTER. From a report of a sermon delivered by Rev. Dr. Creighton, pastor of the lafe Washington Irving,.we make the following extracts: I thank God that I am permitted to indulge this one feeling—that he was sound in the faith of Christ " crucified. I have often been asked if our deceased friend was a believer in the cardinal doctrines of our holy Christian faith, and I have declared then, as I now declare, that he was. This opinion was founded, not alone on his ordinary language in conversation; not only in his uninterrupted observance of the days and ceremonies connected with the Christian institution—and I have never heard a syllable otherwise from him—-but upon a voluntary declaration for which there was no occasion, except that out of the fulness of the heart the mouth speaketh.—One Sabbath morning he approached me, said Dr. Creighton, and asked why we could not have, the ' . 'Gloria in Excelsis" sung every Sunday. I replied that I had no objections...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 January 1860

' §0$tff_* For the American Presbyterian. BISB, JUDA. _— BY J. O. _BtifTHE. __ ' Let _Juda lift her harps of gold, From off the willows now, For Jesus reigns, her mighty King, And glory crowns His brow. The battle lingered all the day, And through the night and on; But when the Sabbath mom drew nigh, The victory was won. O( what a shout was that went up, From off the field of war, Like thunders rolling through the sky, And sounding every where. It was the triumphant voice of Him, Who tiled on Calvary, In greatness of resistless strength, Proclaiming victory* < Like lightnings ran his flashing eyes, Through all the fleeing hosts, And scorched and crushed them down to hell, In spite Of all their boasts. The hearts of God's angelic sons, Were startled when they _flewj And saw the flaming thunderbolts Consume >th apostate erewv Hail! holy _Jesusr, flaming King! The victory is thine, Accomplished by thine own ri gat Arm, That Arm above divine. Rise, Jiula, rise! Shake...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 January 1860

For the American Presbyterian. THE UNION PltAYEK _MEETING. Within the last two years a new feature has arisen in our religions services, namely, the daily Union Prayer meetings. ' The whole Christian world has-experienced the benefits of these means of good. Of those meetings held in other cities, we every day either hear or read, so I will not speak of them, nor even of those held in different parts of our own _cifcy; but I wish to write particularly of the meeting held every day, from four to five in the afternoon, in the Presbyterian Church (New School) in Green street. It seems to me . that if there is any hour of the day more suitable for social prater, it is just at the close of the day. ' When the day is passing away, we feel so much our need of forgiveness for the ills of the past hours, and our great need of fresh supplies of grace to carry us through the night and coming morn. Oh! happy, happy, hour. How many souls will thank God for it when they join that great asse...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 January 1860

THE SCHOOL OF THE PEOPHETS.* There has arisen, during the stirring years which still run their course, a very wide-spread attention to the study of unfulfilled ;prophecy. Books on the subject are in great demand, and the supply apparently meets the demand. It is not unnatural to expect this. The last ten years, dating their beginning at the great European convulsion of 1848, have, without doubt, witnessed so many national complications, social changes, and individual sufferings,—event has so -rapidly thundered on event, and scene flashed on scene,—so altered.have the face of Europe and the relations of Cabinets become, and so unsettled is the European sky at this hour, that intelligent and sober-minded men, with no spice of fanaticism in their natnre, have begun to conclude that the sublime predictions uttered on the Mount 1800 years ago, are being daily translated into modern history. Students of prophecy allege that they see the apocalyptic "vials " pouring out, and hear the...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 January 1860

TEE EIGHTEQFS .HATH HOPE IS HIS DEATH. . "Behold, I see the,heavens opened, and the Son of man standing on the right hand of God." —-Stephen. " ._$_§ ' ¦ " I have fought the good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith; henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness/' —Paul. . " . .; " ' .. " I would rather die for Jesus Christ, than rule to the utmost ends of the _tearth."—Ignatius. . "I bless thee, O Lord, that _thou hast thought me worthy to have part in the number of thy martyrs, in the cup of thy Christ. For this, and for all things, I praise thee, I bless thee, I glorify thee."—Polycdrp. " O how I long for that blessed moment, when this poor unworthy creature, the last and least of all my Blaster's servants, shall be called to put off this loaolt>f sin and corruption, and to mingle with that harmonious host above, doing homage with them in the blessed presence of my glorious Lord." —-Augustine. "O my Heavenly Father, thou hast revealed...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 January 1860

THE _BEAXTTY OF AGE. The sacred biography of the church is full of the most pleasing descriptions of age mellowed by experience, soothed by Divine comfort, and beautified with all the fruits of Christian culture. 1. It must not be overlooked that to old age, when found in the ways of righteousness, belongs preeminently a beauty of mental expression. The outward tabernacle shows, indeed, the marks of decay; but the light from within, shines with a purer and softer splendor. The human countenance, whatever may be the natural cast of the features, is more or less the mirror of the soul twithin; so that beauty is not so much a mere thing of contour and of lineament as it is a thing of expression. It lights the eye with its owa heavenly glow, and suffuses the most irregular features with an attractive softness all its own. We see, in our everyday walks, how positively ugly and loathsome the most regular countenance may be, if it bear the marks of vice, or burn with the fires of con...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 January 1860

For the American Presbyterian. HEAVENMTJSIC. (( There is a strain sweeter than my sister ' s song, at even—holier than my mother ' s prayer. " J. H. B. There is a name, a major name, Sweeter than any other; More precious than the voice of fame, Dearer than thine, my mother. * It fell upon my listening ear, This holy starlight even, And then I knew we stood anear The golden gates of heaven. I knew It was the angels there, . So softly, sweetly singing; And that within those portals fair, Heaven ' s holy harps were ringing. In blessed tones of j«yful praise God-like in their completeness; Dear earth! thy softest strains would raise But discord mid that sweetness _* Yes { E'en thy thrilling words of love, So passionately spoken! The sighing of a wounded dove—A lute whose chords are broken I But oh! That name the angels sing, My soul! That glimpse of glory; I hear again heaven ' s arches ring With ibat glad wondrous story. This name—is Jesus! Lowly now, In deepest adoration, Here at th...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 January 1860

ONE BRICK WR0XG. Workmen were recently building a large brick tower, which was to be carried up very high. The architect and the foreman both charged the masons to lay each brick with the greatest exactness, especially the first courses, which were to sustain all the rest. However, in laying a corner, by accident or carelessness, one brick was set very little out of line. The work went on without its being noticed, but as each course of bricks was kept in line with those already laid, the tower was not put up exactly straight, and the higher they built the more insecure it became. One day, when the tower had been carried up about fifty feet, there was heard a tremendous crash. The building had fallen, burying the men in the ruins. All the previous work was lost, the materials wasted, and worse still, valuable lives were sacrificed, and ail from one brick laid wrong at the start. The workman at fault in this matter little thought how much mischief he was making for the future. ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 January 1860

The Age of Pamphlets.—This is truly the golden age of pamphleteers. The organization of the American House of Representatives is delayed to advertise Helper's Impending Crisis of the South, and the Pope of Home refuses to send a delegate to the Congress of Paris unless Napoleon III. will deny the authorship of the pamphlet entitled La _Pape et le Oongres! Certainly Galileo was right, and the world does move. We, shall probably hear before long that the Em--peror of China has been dethroned by the publication in Mantcbob of an astronomical treatise questioning the reality of Ma blood relationship with the ' fSnn Ca'rit f f.hfl Mnnn.

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 January 1860

_EABNESTHESS Iff THE SEEVICE OF GOD No subject esteemed of deep personal interest is so little considered or appreciated, as the claims of God. Whatever will secure wealth, fame or pleasure, is regarded by men, generally, as the grand business of life. This object attained, and the highest aspirations of the _selSsh heart are realized. All their plans and purposes and endcayOra . —aH their hopes and fears.lie within the narrow limits of earth, and arc restricted to the short and ever fleeting period of life. How ignoble on ot>joct r and how contracted a Sphere for the unfolding of man's immortal nature! His Creator get him apart for a higher , destiny, and the longings of his soul can never be satisfied while he is supremely devoted to things seen and temporal. His disquietudo and discontent in the pursuit of sublunary good, prove that there is a want unsupplied—a void in the soul, that all the gold and pleasure and renown of this world can never fill. The things of t...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 January 1860

EDITOB'S TABJLE. THE GREAT TRIBULATION; or Things Coining on the Earth. By the Kev. John Camming, D. JD-, F. R. S. E., Minister of the, Scotch National Church, Crown Court, Covent Garden. Second Series. New York: Rudd & Carleton. 1860. 12mo. pp. 305. For sale by Lindsay & Blakiston, Philadelphia. This is the second volume or series of Dr. Cumming's lectures on the signs of the times, and the near approach of the millenium. This volume opens with the argument by which he predicates the opinion that 1867 is the year indicated by prophecy when some great and notable event or change will take place upon the earth; the destruction of anti-Christ and the universal prevalence of Christianity and the reign of Christ. The lectures also describe the hopes and blessedness of the righteous in this approaching period of consummation of grace and providence. MAN IN BLACK. A Historical novel of the days of Queen Anne. By G. P. R. James, Esq. Complete in one volume. Philadelph...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 January 1860

THE _PRESBYTEEIAN _aUAETEEEY REVIEW. We have read the January number of this excellent Quarterly with pleasure and profit. The main topics discussed are at present exciting unusual interest in the church, and are treated by able hands and in that satisfactory manner that will tend to strengthen the convictions of the readers, on these important doctrinal truths as held by our church. Clear, consistent and _definite opinions in regard to the fundamental doctemes of religion are essential to an intelligent,, reH_^re _jan d progressive piety. To think and to theorize is the appointed method of acquiring substantial knowledge, of strengthening faith, as well as of developing the receptive faculties and the capacities of the mind: and he who excites and promotes inquiry and investigation, does valuable service to the cause of Christianity j arid he who , in any g ood degree, satisfies the thoughtful mind with rational truth and a comprehensive and philosophical view of the chief en...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 January 1860

THE JAFAW _MISSION. The following interesting letter from the Rev. Samuel R. Brown, who sailed from New York in May last, was published in the Christian Intelligencer, and will be new to most of your readers. This is Mr. Brown's second adventure as a missionary in China and Japan. He was obliged to return to his native country on account of the failing health of his wife, and he now goes back to1 his work with renewed hope and courage. Mr. Brown was early consecrated to the ministry by a devoted Christian mother; and his life adds another witness to the success of maternal fidelity. We may be allowed here to state, that his mother is the author of the tract, "Poor Sarah," and quite a number of our sweetest, popular hymns; among which we would mention the one commencing with the verse: ** I love to steal awhile away , Prom every cumbering care, Ami spend the hours of setting, day, In humble, grateful prayer.'? We are happy to announce the arrival of our brethren at Hong Kong,...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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