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Elephind.com contains 224 items from Our Daily Fare, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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FATE AND THE ARAB LOVER. [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 14 June 1864

FATE AND THE ARAB LOVER. [Written for "Our Daily Faro" by Rev. W. RouNSEVILLK AMER, author of " P ootry of tho East."] Milawno Tanbo loved Ab Tulib's wife, The fair and gentle Leila el Aktcel; And vain of harp and words is every strife To tell what love makes hearts liko Tanbo's foci. Ho pines away, his love so deadly strong, With maddening thoughts of Leila el Akteel. At length his dying soul exhales in song, And thus tho notes in faltering accents steal. " Let Ltlia el Akteel, when I am dead, Bui come where this poor body lies interred And speak to me, and I shall lift my head To answer, or my tomb itself be heard." Throe moons have sailed above tho poet's tomb, Built in tho mountain side, his village nigh. For camels twain the path yield, narrow room, But there are two abreast now traveling by. The burial place is still and lonesome all; Weird lights and shades tho fate of man rehearse. "Go yonder, Leila, on that madman call; See how he keeps the promise of his verso." "A...

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
SUITABLE FOR A GENTLEMAN. [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 14 June 1864

SUITABLE FOR A GENTLEMAN. "DROBABLY there are few things among the rich and vast varieties exhibited at our Great Fair, so difficult to find as a present "suitable for a gentleman." We are not prepared to take very high ground on this subject at present, and to attribute the difficulty to the superiority of the male sex in being entirely above the adventitious aids and requirements of the fair; we are content to state the fact. Nobody ever was at a loss for a present to a woman. The only question to be considered is the amount you desire to appropriate for the purpose,—given that, as the mathematicians say, and the problem is easy. Diamonds and cashmeres float high up among the thousands; corals and crapes are among the hundreds, while the vulgar fractions of those sums represent to the bewildered vision every thing that is "neat and appropriate." There are things, too, which all sorts and conditions of men can, with propriety, offer to all sorts and conditions of women. You...

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 14 June 1864

PHILADELPHIA, JUNE 14,1864

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
BOUNTIES. [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 14 June 1864

BOUNTIES. During the American Revolution this subject claimed the early attention of WASHINGTON, who, soon after he was chosen commander-inchief of the army of the United States, wrote the following admirable letter to the President of Congress, then sitting in Philadelphia: " HAARLEM HEIGHTS, Sept. 4th, 1776. " Something is due to the man who puts his life in your hands; hazards his health, and forsakes the sweets of domestic enjoyment. " My opinion is, that a good bounty should be offered, aided by the proffer of at least 100 to 150 acres of land, and a suit of clothes; and a blanket to a non-commissioned officer. However high the men's pay may appear, it is barely sufficient, in the present scarcity and dearness of all kinds of goods, to keep them in clothes, much less to support their families." His suggestions were approved by Congress soon after the receipt of the letter. It is equally applicable to our brave and gallant soldiers at the present time. IF YOU once make a r...

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A NEW AND INTERESTING FEATURE. [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 14 June 1864

A NEW AND INTERESTING FEATURE. In yesterday's number of our little journal we published the first of a series of letters from the army, written by a gentleman sent to White House for that special purpose. These letters are designed to explain the system and methods by which the Sanitary Commission carry on their grand work of benevolence. They will show every operation of the Sanitary from the time a package of goods is received by a branch office or.society, to the time when the goods are distributed on the field or in the hospital; how the contributions are collected together in depots, receipted for and recorded; how they are sent forward on requisition; how they are taken care of both in the depots and on the field; how the quantities of the various articles required are ascertained; how they are issued, and the issues are recorded; how they are dispensed to the suffering soldier, and, in a word, how all the vast and multifarious proceedings of this noble organization ar...

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
But fctli Jfaow [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 14 June 1864

But fctli Jfaow

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
SCHOOLS FOR VETERANS. [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 14 June 1864

SCHOOLS FOR VETERANS. Among the maimed soldiers returned to us by the war are many young men who, though disqualified by the loss of a limb from pursuing mechanical callings, might succeed as teachers or professional men, and, in fact, in many " higher pursuits," were they well educated; and thousands among them are still capable of receiving the proper degree of culture. Let there be an organized "movement" for the purpose of educating such men. Many are trained gratis to become officers for war ; why should there not be education without price for the arts of peace ? Their countryman can well afford to support and teach these brave fellows any calling which they may see fit to choose, and it will be found, in the end, that our industry has gained by doing so. After all, " one brain is worth two pair of hands—any day." ^_ THE GBEAT object of an American is to die rich; of a Frenchman, to live rich.

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
u on HAT owi w [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 14 June 1864

u on HAT owi w What is Seen and Done There—Reports and Gossip-. THE rush to the Fair was greater yesterday than any former day. The ticket sellers were kept as busy as so many financial bees hiving the green-backs, which are to go towards the funds of the Sanitary Commission. In all the avenues and departments there were throngs of delighted visitors, and a good business was done all around. AVe continue our notice of the Fair, and the matters and things connected therewith. THE PENNSYLVANIA KITCHEN. The Executive Committee of the Great Central Fair did a sagacious thing when they placed Mrs. H. P. M. BIBKENBINE at the head of the ladies' branch of the committee to get up a Pennsylvania Kitchen. The lady named not only aided in the work of getting up the kitchen, but she has proved a host in keeping it "up," a task not less important than the primary organization of the institution. In the first place, we have a large room, " white washed with blue," or with some other color...

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
OUR COUNTRY'S CAUSE. [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 14 June 1864

OUR COUNTRY'S CAUSE. BY M. J . M. 8. War's cruel ploughshare cleaves tho land In furrows wide and deep; Each furrow is a hallowed grave Where our loved heroes sleep. But all the seed we're planting now In weariness and pain, Shall, at tho harvest-time bring forth Fair fields of priceless grain! Our hearts are saddened by tho sight Of sick and wounded men ; It seems as though God's summer air Could ne'er be pure again. But side by side with war's dark sins Man's noblest virtues shine, And woman's sweet compassion beams With lustre half divine. Sweet Mother Earth with tender caro Covers her wounds with flowers,— And we would learn her loving art For those deep wounds of ours.— For though our griefs must inly bleed Through many a coming year, ' Each sorrow makes our country's cause To patriot hearts more dear.

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
RECOLLECTIONS OF THE METROPOLITAN FAIR. [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 14 June 1864

RECOLLECTIONS OF THE METROPOLITAN FAIR. BY A WOUNDED SOLDIER. Among tho contributions from " without the city," none were move admired than the blue velvet album filled with sketches by Philadelphia artists. This we owed to two patriotic sisters-in-law, we were told, and it was one of the attractions of the "Art Gallery." The contributions from Switzerland were very beautiful and valuable. Musical boxes, watches, bracelets, the famous Swiss carved work, silks, and some "kirsch-wasser" in which you could drown your sorrows, and some "absynthe," in which you could dry them up again. More than $12,000 was derived from the Swiss goods alone. In fact, tho "Seventeenth-street building," which "rose like an exhalation," was built to accommodate the great overflow of gifts from abroad. One table indeed (Mrs. R. M. Hunt's) made over $28,000 from foreign goods. Even "perfide Albion" found a voice and sent us a very handsome contribution. The Seventeenth-street building had a ghost of it...

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
WHAT A SOLDIER SAID. [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 14 June 1864

WHAT A SOLDIER SAID. Along one of our most crowded streets, at high noon, an old gentleman in a genial state of mind was asked by a stalwart youth in Uncle Sam's suit, a direction to a place not for off. As the old man turned to point the way to the soldier, he noticed with pleasure his stout frame, honest face, and manly bearing, and a feeling of pity thrilled him for the hitch in that right leg of the bold boy, as he .stood there leaning on a cane. " What part of the country do you come from ?" asked the old man. " Rhode Island, sir." " How long have you been in the army?" " Five years in the Rhode Island th, and never knew what it was to be sick an hour." "You walk lame." " Shell, sir, ripped up right leg at Spottsylvania, 16th of May; but I was taken care of almost the minute I was knocked over; caught up in arms, carried away, never asked ' was I wounded?' or, 'where was I wounded?' but they took me and put me right straight through like men, did them Sanitary boys, and...

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
HOW THE SANITARY IS WORKING IN THE FIELD.—No. 2. [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 14 June 1864

HOW THE SANITARY IS WORKING IN THE FIELD.—No. 2. [From our Correspondent with the Army of tho Potomac.] WHITE HOUSE LANDING , June 3, 1864. Arrived at this place before noon to-day. The shrill whistle of our little " Guy" had invited to the landing quite a party of employees of the Commission, who sought the papers and more private mail matter with much eagerness. The approach to the Landing presents a busy scene. The winding Pamunkey, with its stirring fleet, the tented villages on the shore, and the trains of wagons carrying forage and supplies, the naked chimneys of the historic old " White House," and the flags of the country and our country's Commission, give to the whole view quite an unlooked-for appearance of life and earnestness. The flats on the opposite shore, with the low forests behind stretching northward a considerable distance, indicate the home of Pamunkey Indians, quite a tribe of whom still remain. So much for the " situation." The cargo was delivered to M...

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 14 June 1864

PRINTED by RiHOWAU & Bnowtr, 111 & 113 South 4th Street, Philadelphia, for the Great Central Fair in aid of the United States Sanitary Commission.

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
THE FAIR MOVEMENT IK THE LOTAL STATES.—Ho. 7. [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 15 June 1864

THE FAIR MOVEMENT IK THE LOTAL STATES.—Ho. 7. THE FAIR AT I> O U (1 H K E E P S I E . [March 15, 1864.] The "Ides of March," 1864, will be long remembered in our quiet rural city. Their doors were opened to a marvellous exhibition of taste and skill—of beauty living, and beauty in "still life"—charming to the eye, and grateful to the patriotic heart. It was a fair in aid of the United States Sanitary Commission, for the benefit of the National soldiers. It was the result of the combined and earnest labor of women for little more than a month. The inscription of this fair if an illustratration ef the truth in the juvenile oration—" Large streams from little fountains flow, Tall oaks from little acorns grow." At a social gathering at the close of January, a delicate young girl proposed a Sanitary Fair. The idea was electrical. It vivified generous feelings which were too latent for usefulness. It took tangible shape a few days afterward, when a call was made for a meeting...

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 15 June 1864

EDITOBIAL OOIIMITTXX: GENTLEMEN- . LADIES. CHAS. GODFREY LELAND, CHAIRMAN, WILLIAM V. MoKEAN, PROF. HENRY COPPEE, GEORGE II. BOKER, CRAIG RIDDLE, REV. WM. H. FURNESS, FRANCIS WELLS, R. MEADE BACIIE, ASA I. FISH, CEPHAS Q. CHILDS. MRS. ROBERT M. HOOPER, MRS. E. S. RANDOLPH, MRS. WILLIAM S. PHILLIPS, MRS. THOMAS P. JAMES, MRS. PHEBB M. CLAPP, MISS SARAH F. CUYLER, MISS ANNA M. LEA, MISS GRACE KIERNAN. MISS LAURA HOOPER, MISS DELIMA BLAIS. disposing of them to every applicant; a Temple in which Flora was the presiding deity; a Bullfinch that sung sweetly every hour; a Museum of relics and curiosities ; a gallery of pictures, and a skating pond—a philosophical toy by which fourteen little figures when moved on a revolving disc, were made, by mirrors, to represent thousands of skaters gliding over a surface miles in extent. More attractive and profitable than any other, was a Duchcs county room one hundred years ago, in which society at that period was illustrated by living...

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A "TIPPEE" WOMAN. [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 15 June 1864

A "TIPPEE" WOMAN. The term of the three months' volunteers, under the first call of the President, expired in the fall of 1861. Most of those from Pennsylvania having been enlisted at Harrisburg, were discharged from service at that place. At that time the arrangements for paying and transporting large bodies of men were quite inadequate, and the discharged soldiers were necessarily thrown upon the hospitality of the town until they could be paid and sent to their respective homes. The houses of the citizens were thrown open and every resident family daily fed a certain number of soldiers. Of course, at a time like this, the Governor's house was considered very much in the light of a hotel, and the run of custom was tremendous. It need hardly be said in Pennsylvania that the family of the worthy Governor were quite equal to the emergency, and that their energy in procuring and their liberality in supplying food for all who required it seemed to be without limit. One day, after...

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
THE EMPTY SLEEVE. [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 15 June 1864

THE EMPTY SLEEVE. At a political meeting in New York, where a number of speeches had been made, one of our well-known poets was suddenly called upon to do his part. Rising, without any preparation, and pausing a moment for a theme, his eye caught the empty coat-sleeve of an officer at his side, and he instantly improvised the following lines: " By the moon'J palo light to this gazing throng Let me tell one tale, let me sing one song; 'Tis a story devoid of an aim or a plan, 'Tis a simple tulo of a one-arm man. 'Till this very hour I could ne'er holieve What a tell-tale thing is an empty sleeve. It tells in a silent tone to all, Of a country's need and a country's call; Of a kiss, or a tear, for a child or a wife, And a hurried search for a nation's life. 'Till tills very hour who'd ever believe, What a tell-tale thing is an empty sleeve—What a weird, queer tiling, is an empty sleeve. It tells of a battle-field of gore, Of the sabre's crash, of the cannon's roar; Of the deadly ...

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
AUTOGRAPHS. [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 15 June 1864

AUTOGRAPHS. [Written for '' Oar Daily Fare."] A distinguished literary man recently remarked to us that he had written no less than five hundred autographs within the last few months, in compliance with the request of Committees of Fairs and of private collectors. Let us reflect upon this astounding fact before proceeding further. Five hundred autographs; bless us! Now let the reader sit down and write his name in duplicate five hundred times, and see how it feels. If the pen holds out, it is doubtful whether the hand will, to say nothing of the brain. Now add to this the labor of inclosing and addressing these autographs, to say nothing of the pleasant process of applying the postage stamps, and some faint idea may be obtained of the penalty of greatness or notoriety, whichever name is most applicable. Our literary lion evidently thought it a bore to be subjected to tuch demands upon his time and patience; although once on a time, perhaps, his vanity was tickled by such reque...

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
SHAKSPEABE ON THE REBELLION. [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 15 June 1864

SHAKSPEABE ON THE REBELLION. THE POET FOR ALL TIME. It requires but little comment to point out to the general reader how aptly the following quotations, from the works of the World's Great Dramatist, fit the rebels and the rebellion of our day, and the war of the loyal people to put them down. The passages extracted are from but two of the plays, KING JOHN and RICHARD II., and are only such as attracted our attention during a reperusal of those plays for another purpose. The first extract is that wherein the specious traitor BOLINQBROKE , although in open revolt, puts on the air of the injured party, as JEFF. DAVIS does, and asks to be informed of what offense he has committed. Thus: BOUXGBROKE.—"My gracious uncle, let me know my fault; On what condition stands it, and wherein ?" YORE.—" Even in condition of the worst degree In gross rehellion and detested treason." RICHARD II—Act II.—Scene 3. Substituting BRECKINRIDGE for BOLINGBROKB, in the next following passage, how fitly...

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
HAVE YOU GOT YOUB PAPER? [Newspaper Article] — Our Daily Fare — 15 June 1864

HAVE YOU GOT YOUB PAPER? QOME of our subscribers may suppose that ^ this is a question in which we feel no interest. They doubtless picture us sitting in some cool, sequestered spot, reading, with placid content, our last issue, and sublimely regardless of their wrongs, while they, deprived for days of their " Daily Fare," are fast reaching the condition of our prisoners at Richmond. How delusive the picture! The poet COLERIDGE, in a celebrated poem, describes the sufferings of an individual who was detained from a festival he hoped to enjoy, by a certain ancient mariner. This gentleman detailed his grievances at very great length, and of his hearer it is said: •' The weddmg guest ho beat his breast, Yet he cannot choose but hear." ' We have had not one ancient mariner who might in time be appeased, but many hard-hearted landsmen refusing to be comforted. Instead, therefore, of enjoying the beauties of the Fair, we, and all those connected with the paper, have been, like the...

Publication Title: Our Daily Fare
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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