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Elephind.com contains 658,475 items from Columbia Daily Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 3,306 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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PEITHOLOGIAN SOCIETY. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 December 1877

PEITHOLOGIAN SOCIETY. REGULAR meeting. Friday evening, November 9th, 1877. The officers-elect were inaugurated with appropriate ceremonies. Considerable miscellaneous business was transacted, ot no public interest. Other literary exercises ot the evening being suspended, a general debate took place upon the question. Resolved; That that it would be beneficial for the United States Government to own and control the principal railroad and telegraph lines in the United States. Messrs. Foster and Curtiss argued in the affirmative. Messrs. Ohart, O'Neil, Barnum, May, and Bangs, contested in the negative. Decisions : Upon the merits of the question, — negatively; upon the merits Ot the argument, — negatively. Duties announced and adjourned. The present status of the society is most encouraging; and its members have shown unmistakable evidences of a determination to make Peitholog. the foremost society connected with the college. The present editors of Academic Recreations have been enjoin...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ABOUT COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 December 1877

ABOUT COLLEGE. THE Second Annual Ball for the benefit of the Boat Club will take place, as before, at Delmonico's, on the 27th of December. The Committee are: Robert C. Cornell, '74; J. T. Goodwin, S. of L., '7B; F. S. Bangs, '7B ; G. P. Erhard, '79. S. of M, THE winners at the fall meeting of the C. C. A. A. have not yet received their prizes. • PRINCETON and Yale will not play another game of foot-ball this year. Thus neither college can claim the championship. ANOTHER overcoat has been taken from the cloak room. As no other coat was left in its place, it is safe to assume that it was stolen. Strong efforts should be made to discover the thief, and when found he should be summarily dealt with. AT a regular meeting of the Senior Class, held on Monday, Dec. 3d, the remainder of the class officers were elected, making the full list as follows : Joseph Mattison Knapp President. Willian Henry De Forest, Jr First Vice-President. Holbrook Cushman Second Vice-President. Cornwall Kensingto...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
An Almost Forgotten Poem. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 December 1877

An Almost Forgotten Poem. THE following poem is "by George Arnold, the brilliant and unfortunate Bohemian, who ran his brief career in New York and Chicago a few years since. R. H. Stoddard once read it, and declared that name and fame awaited the author if he would but apply himself steadily to literature : " BEER. Here, With my beer, 1 sit ; While golden moments, Alas ! They pass Unheeded by, And, as they fly, I, Being dry, Sit idly sipping here My beer. Oh, finer far Than fame or riches are The graceful smoke-wreaths of this free cigar. Why Should 1 Weep, wail or sigh ? What if luck has passed me by ! What if my hopes are dead — My pleasures fled ? Have I not still My fill Of right good cheer, Cigars and Beer ? Go, whining" youth ! Forsooth — Go weep and wail, Sigh and grow pale : Weave melancholy rhymes On the old times Whose joys, like shadowy ghosts appear, But leave me to my beer. Gold is dross ; Love is loss ; So if I gulp my sorrows down, Or see them drown In foamy draughts...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
IN "THE MINES." Editorial Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 December 1877

IN "THE MINES." Editorial Notes. SEVERAL of our graduates, notably Messrs. Blossom, Jenney, Irving, "and the late Newton, have found employment, as geologists and mineralogists on Government and State Surveys. Such positions require a ready familiarity with the numerous specimens of fossil life, which distinguish the different geological periods. In the department of Palaeontology, the students of our School are taught by means of lectures, illustrated by specimens of fossils handed around the class. Some few purchase the text book, mentioned in the catalogue, but the majority prefer to trust to their notes so that at examination he that can memorize the longest list of names receives the highest mark. Now that a new regulation requiring monthly examinations has been introduced, might it not be well, instead of a written examination, giving the results of the previous evening's cram, to substitute a practical one. Let the student be furnished with a certain number of specimens, and ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 December 1877

THE COLLEGE WORLD. Amherst : The Glee Club will probably give one or two concerts this term. Amherst defeated Tufts Nov. 14. Score : Amherst, two touch-downs; Tufts, one. The pitchers of the University nine practice in the gymnasium. The foot-ball team has gone into winter quarters. The Seniors have been reveling in " double Hickok " for a few days. At a recent meeting '7B decided to make the following changes in the usual class day exercises. In the forenoon ivy planting with an oration and poem is proposed ; in the afternoon the exercises at the hall will be as usual, but at the grove the class prophecy will be substituted for the customary oration. At a recent meeting of the Trustees, the Treasurer reported $7,000 over the running expenses of the college. The Trustees voted $5OO for the Art Gallery, Prof. Judson Smith, of Oberlin, has been elected to the Samuel Green professorship ot Biblical history and interpretation. Dr. Field, Amherst, '34, has been elected librarian. Bowdoin...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
MUSIC AND THE DRAMA. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 December 1877

MUSIC AND THE DRAMA. THE great success of Dr. Leopold Damrosch's first series of Symphony-matinees at Steinway Hall, has induced him to inaugurate a second series, the first concert of which took place Saturday, the Bth inst. The overture to " Ruy Bias " was played finely by the orchestra, and Mr. S. B. Mills played a concerto of Schumann in his usual fine style. The other members of the programme were also well supported. From the indications of this concert, the second series will be fully as enjoyable as the first, and we congratulate Dr. Damrosch on his success. None of our musical readers should fail to visit these matinees, the quality of which is, as we have said, ot the very highest order. MR. THEODORE THOMAS, in compliance with very numerous requests, and in order to accommodate those who are unable to obtain eligible seats at his regular symphony rehearsals, will give a series of six extra public rehearsals at Steinway Hall. The extra public rehearsals to the symphony conc...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE LIBRARY. HOLIDAY BOOKS. II. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 December 1877

THE LIBRARY. HOLIDAY BOOKS. II. A POWERFUL story, illustrated in a charming manner, we find in The Scarlel Letter, with illustrations by Mrs. Mary Hallock Foote, published by Osgood. The great romance of Hawthorne—-a classic of the English tongue—the grandest work of fiction ever produced on American soil, will live with the language, and with the master pieces of Scott or Dickens. Criticism cannot enlarge any more than lias already been done on the merits of a work which every one conversant with literature must read in some form or other, but it is with genuine pleasure that the announcement of a new and illustrated edition of the book can be made. The illustrations in the handsome volume before us are excellent and show in every line the hand of a genuine artist. The prettiest flowerpieces, quaint interiors, and fine landscapes, vary with delicate and beautiful pictures of the principal scenes of the book—of Hester Prynne, her boy, ol the merits of both, as they stand before the ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 December 1877

SHAVINGS. IMPORTED Professor to Hardened Junior (referring to Electives) —" What are you going to take, Mr. ?" H. J. —" Oh, thank you ! I don't care if I do. I'll take a hot scotch." BRILLIANT Junior reciting in Logic —" That would be going from summum genus to infernal species !" PROF, in Moral Philosophy.—"Justice and benevolence are two essential attributes of a supreme mind." Senior: "Professor, are not those terms contradictory in some respects?'' Prof.: "My dear sir, when you have come to the age of fifty years and have a large family of children, you will often punish them from mere love." Fleeting visions of a class cup flit before the Senior's eyes, and he subsides in a happy frame of mind. CLASS in Science of Government. Teacher. —"Under what circumstances can a senator be arrested ?" Prep. —(thoughtfully) "In case —of —of breach of promise." SHE was a very modest girl (just from Boston), and when the observatory astronomer said : "take a glance through the telescope, Miss...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 January 1878

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. 11. NEW YORK, JANUARY ist, 1878. No. 7. Board of Editors, 1877-1878. FREDERICK W. HOLLS, '7B, Editor-in-Chief,\ J. FISCHER, '7B, S - OF L - Managing Editor. J. W. SPALDING, '7B- C. H. CROW, '7B. H. G. PAINE, '79- W - PARSDNS > J R - '79* C. D. STARR, 'BO S. of M. M. BENJAMIN, '7B S. of M. S. B. POND, '79, Secretary. TERMS. Per annum, in advance, - $2.00 Single copies, - - - - - " 1 5 cts - Subscriptions by mail should be addressed to MR. WM. F. MORGAN, Treasurer, 634 Fifth Avenue, New York. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 January 1878

CURRENT TOPICS. ee TT APPY NEW YEAR" has come once more, 1~1 and we cordially trust that it will be a very happy one for each and every one of our readers as well as for the college which we represent. For the students, happiness is just now alloyed with a view ot the examination, looming up on the horizon, but we trust the apprehensions caused by this spectre will disappear with time. Of course all of our readers are now full of good intentions for the year, and though we tiust they well know their own deficiencies, we will nevertheless venture to suggest some more, and hope that it not all, at least the most will be carried out. We hope our venerable trustees seriously intend to provide tor new buildings by next October, to re-establish Cramweek and the study of history, to appropriate a handsome sum for the Semi-Annual, to increase the library, to buy a new organ ; in fine to do all those things which they ought to do, and to undo all those things which they ought not to have don...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE SCHOLAR IN POLITICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 January 1878

THE SCHOLAR IN POLITICS. THE recent lecture of President Barnard to the Senior Class on "The Silver Question," calls to mind once more the absence, in the most important discussions on vital questions ot the day, of arguments from the principal men in the world of learning and education. It is no secret that laws and regulations concerning the highest interests of the nation and the welfare of each individual, are lett, in the United States, principally to a band ot astute and genes ally uneducated politicians, who acquire by various means the right to call themselves " the Congress of the United States." The learned men, the best lawyers, the most accomplished scholars, the college presidents and piofessors, —men whose lives are devoted to the pursuit ot useful knowledge, —all these have generally very little influence. They are seldom found on the floor of Con- gress, or in the State legislatures. They are rarely in office, and when they lift up their voices in the newspapers, mag...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
NOTE-BOOKS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 January 1878

NOTE-BOOKS. WE copy the following from an old college paper, and reproduce it here without further comment. The facts stated, and the counsel given, are such as hold good now as well as at the time when the article was written : " We are inclined to think that the value of a notebook is very much overrated by a portion of our students. During each term many hours are spent in rewriting notes which are complete and perfectly intelligible ; and wherein lies the advantage ol it we are at a loss to perceive. There are some whose chirography is so bad when hastily done as to be almost unreadable j after the student has forgotten about what each word j ought to be ; these, ol course, are obliged to copy their notes. But among others there seem to be two motives to the work. One is, the hope that the professor will be pleased with the nicely-written pages, and therefore make some allowance for bad recitations; the other, and prevailing one, being an idea that the note-book will be of some ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
BOATING. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 January 1878

BOATING. Harvard's version of Columbia's Challenge. (From The Crimson, Dec. 20, 1877.) COLUMBIA'S challenge to the Boat Club has been declined. The advisability of accepting this challenge has always been an open question; and now, when the reasons are known which caused Harvard to decline it (the conditions which Columbia felt that the acceptance of her challenge for last year had given hei strength to insist upon), the action of the Executive Committee in settling the matter as they have, will, we think, meet general approval. Word was sent to Columbia that, as it would be necessary, in the event of a race, for the same Harvard crew to row Columbia which was to row Yale, Harvard would like to make the same agreement with Columbia as with Yale in regard to the men eligible for the crew. By this agreement candidates for the degrees A. 8., B. S„ Ph. B„ LL. B„ B. D., M. D., Ph. D., and A. M„ are eligible to the crew; but candidates for the five lastnamed degrees must previously have t...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 January 1878

OUR EXCHANGES. AS usual, a large pile of college papers lies before us awaiting reading and criticism. One of the most thankless positions on the editorial staff seems to us be that of exchange editor. He is to judge of the merits of fifty periodicals, nine-tenths of which he never opens, and with all this his space is cut down by the chief editor's scalping knife, to a minimum. Then there are so many conflicting claims to criticism on the part of the papers. Old and established papers can never be slighted, yet here come numerous new and fresh colleagues who at least deserve some acknowledgement. All these difficulties are better enumerated than understood, yet for all that the exchange department of a college paper is important, and shows the spirit of a journal very well. Those snappy three-line criticisms full of irony, etc., show lack of brains somewhere, and, —oh friend of the Chronicle , pardon us I—those long essays in the style of Lamb often remind one of sheep. However, "l...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ABOUT COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 January 1878

ABOUT COLLEGE. THE class of '7B has chosen the following committee on Photographs : J. F. Crowe 11, chairman ; W. H. De Forest, Jr., H. R. C. Watson, W. J. G. Beams, W. Allen. THE following is the semi-annual committee of the Senior Class: Booth, chairman ; Cheesman, Peyton, Davis, Schell, Hoffman, Simonson. EIGHTY has elected Messrs. Philips and Johnson speakers, to represent the class at the semi-annual exhibition. LYNCH and Lacey are '79's semi-annual speakers. CRANE and Clover, of 'Bl, will be the Freshmen to close the speaking at the coming students' exhibition. PRESIDENT and Mrs. Barnard did not receive callers this New Year's, on account of their absence from the city. Mrs. Barnard has been spending the winter at Clifton Springs for the benefit of her health, and the Doctor has gone on to pass the holidays with her. PRESIDENT BARNARD delivered a lecture before the Senior class on the silver question, the Friday before the holidays. It lasted two hours, and was listened to wit...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
IN "THE MINES." [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 January 1878

IN "THE MINES." THE annual reception of the School of Mines took place on the evening of Dec. 21, and as usual went off smoothly and was productive of much pleasure. The attendance, however, was somewhat smaller than heretofore, owing to the late hour at which the invitations were issued. There were probably not more than two hundred guests present, and of these at least ■one hundred and fifty were gentlemen ; so that although the row of desks on either side reduced the size of the room very considerably, there was abundant space to ■dance without jostling the unbroken line of shirt-bosoms ranged along the side of the hall. The music (furnished by Neyer) was excellent, and continued till after midnight. There were no refreshments for the general public, as the prescribed sum will but just cover the other expenses, but strange sounds heard issuing from the spectroscope room attached to the qualitative laboratory indicated the existence of a private feast of some kind. The decorations...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 January 1878

THE COLLEGE WORLD. Amherst : 'BO will read Fontaine's fables next term in addition to the Athalie. The Juniors who elect Latin next term will read Ouintilian and Lucretius. The applications for charitable aid have decreased fifty per cent, in the last four years. Beloit; — The faculty have forbidden the proposed entertainment of the Seniors, at the end of the term. Boston University: The members of '7B have voted to have no public class-day exercises. Bowdoin ; A Freshman became disgusted with his poor luck at cards, and coolly consigned his whole pack to the flames. The Dancing School appears to be a successful one, and to meet with general approbation. Brown: — About twenty-five of the students singin the Moody and Sankey choir. A Freshman who wished to read up on Mineralogy began on Ruskin's " Stones of Venice." The 'BO Glee Club have sung at two entertainments. Ample arrangements are to be made for base-ball practice, in the gymnasium. Cornell: — A Freshman who saw on a Senior's...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
MUSIC AND THE DRAMA. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 January 1878

MUSIC AND THE DRAMA. WE cannot, in our opinion, serve better to promote the cause ot true and excellent music among our readers than by calling their attention to such new works of importance, and such editions of standard composers, as are best calculated to give genuine satisfaction. Among the latter, the " Edition Peters (Leipzig, and G. Schirmer, 701 Broadway, New York) is pre-eminently the best and the least expensive ; and as to its adaptability to less expert players, the constant - use, for years, of this edition, has convinced us, that it leaves very little to be desired. To enumerate the works which have already appeared would be impossible, for the catalogue comprises upward of fifteen hundred entries, but we advise our musical friends if convenient to call some day at the music rooms of the New York publisher, and an assortment of compositions will there be found, quite unequalled in this city. The works are all printed from plates, some indeed less distinct than might b...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE LIBRARY. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 January 1878

THE LIBRARY. /CHOICE AUTOBIOGRAPHY. Edited by Wm. D. Howells. Vols. IV., Voitorio Alfieri; V., Carlo Goldoni; VI., Edward Gibbon. This pretty series of pleasant literature has alreadybeen mentioned in these columns. The volumes now before us certainly uphold the standard of the first. The life of Alfieri, the Italian Shakespeare, as depicted by himself is exceedingly fascinating, and the memoir by Mr. Howells is of course a very * excellent essay. Some fifty years ago, a fireside series was published in London, the volumes of which are very rare and highpriced. The volumes in this series certainly will enjoy a wide popularity as soon as the public becomes acquainted with their merits. Of Goldoni's book we can only say that we think it will immortalize his name much better than any of his works of art, while the autobiography of Gibbon will certainly continue to take a worthy place beside his " Decline and Fall." Though many readers probably possess the autobiography bound along with...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 January 1878

SHAVINGS. TO renovate an old hat: Take it to an evening party, and leave early. AN old lady from the South said she never could imagine where all the Smiths came from, until she saw in a New England town a large sign, " Smith Manufacturing Company." THE following is on excellent authority and the only crushing refutation of all charges against the virtue of the much-abused Yale undergraduate. Scene, Moriartv's : enter two rollicking Freshmen bent on a " tear." First Fresh., with confidence: "Bring us some chocolate." Frank—with disgust disclaims knowledge of any such mixture. Second Fresh., cheerfully: "Well nevermind, we'll take some good strong tea.'' Frank hesitates whether he shall have them put out or treat them with silent contempt. The latter course is pursued. " Don't keep tea here, sir." Both Freshmen in chorus : " What, no tea, no chocolate ? What sort of a place do you call this!" (On reflection). Well then, bring us a glass of water and a lump of sugar in it. I say, Chum...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
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