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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

TIM INDIAN ADVOCATE 17 won't be a guest over to-morrow night. An idler's money is apt to leap out of his pocket. It is likely to go for a pipe, a cigar, a tobacco plug, a mug of ale. There is no money in pocket warming. Take your hands out of your pockets, young man. You are loosing time. Time is valuable. People 'feel it nt the other end of the line, when death is near and eternity is pressing them into such small quarters, for the work of this life craves hours, days, weeks, years. If those at this ond of the line, if youth with its abundance of re sources would only feel that the time was precious. Time is a quarry. Every hour may be a nugget of gold. It is time in whose invaluable moments we build our bridges, spike the iron rails to the sleepers, plant our crops, rear our cattle, run our ox-wagons. You might have dug twenty hills of potatoes while I have been talking to you, young man. Take your hands out of your pockets. The world wants those hands. The world is .not dead, asl...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

18 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. A Memory of the Franco-Prussian War. In the little church-yard of an old fashioned French hamlet, as most French hamlets are, stands, amid the surrounding graves, a solitary cross, on which hangs, in spring and summer, an often -renewed wreath of flowers, supplemented in autumn by garlands of many-colored leaves, and when the snows of winter render the pure silence of" the cemetery, more pure and sil ent still, a carefully treasured wreath of immortelles is produced from the innumerable wrappings which have protected it during the summer, and, placed by a pair of withered hands, tireless in this labor of love, upon the arm of the shapely cross that stands alone, in its little inclosure, marking no grave, yet sacred to the memory of one whose story I am about to relate to you. The trembling feet that make a daily pilgrimage to the spot, the loving fingers that arrange and rearrange the flowery offerings, the tearful eyes that never cease weeping at the foot of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 10 which hung opposito the table, where the mother could always have her eyes upon it. But the soft, calm expression of the youthful features, now illumined by the rays of the setting sun, seemed to re-assure him, for he sat down again, half-laughing at the idea. "I would better not lose my head. Our Christian a renegade a Prussian! Never!" Once more restored to good humor, the blacksmith finished his meal, and sallied forth to meet a couplo of chums at the Ville de Strasbourg. Now Mother Lory is alone. Putting the three little girls to bed, in a tiny nest under the roof, she takes her work and sits before the door that faces the garden. From time to time she sighs and says to herself: "Yes, it is all true. They are cowards, these renegades, but their mothers will be glad to see them, all the same." She recalls the evenings, not so long ago, when her own son was wont to be busy, at this hour in the little garden, pruning vines, attending to the bee-hives, or wat...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

RRHU BO THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ii between them. "Lory, Lory! do not kill him! It was I who sent for him. I wrote that you needed him; that you wanted him at home." "You sent for him! you his mother! I need him! T who would give my heart's best blood for France!" He cast her aside, but she clung to him with all her strength and desper ation, crying and sobbing. The little ones in the room above, covered their heads in the bed-clothes to shut out the unusual sounds of anger and violence, and fell asleep, crying in each other's arms. Suddenly, looking steadfastly at his wife, the blacksmith sat down, threw his sword on the table, and said, in a voice unusually calm: "Ah, you sent for him, did you? Well let him stay. To-morrow to morrow we shall see what J shall do." So saying, he leaned his arms heavily upon the table and rested his head upon it, without another word. The mother and son stole quietly from the scene. The next morning, Christian, awak ing from an uneasy sleep filled with v...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. n garden. That also is thine. The fruit trees, tho beo-hivos, the flowers, the house, all belong to thee. Since thou hast sacrificed thy honor for these things, the least thou canst do is to take care of them. Thou art master here. For me I am going. Thou owest five years to France; I go to pay them for thee." He walked with long strides to the door. "Lory Raoul ! where are you go ing?" cried his wife, weeping. "Father! father!" exclaimed the son, running after him. But already he had crossed the threshold and walked away hastily, neither answering, nor looking back. At Liddi-bol-Abbes, at the quarters of the 13th Zouaves, there was entered, some days after, a fine, well-preserved, but silent and stem-looking volunteer, named .Raoul Constant Lory, aged fifty five years. Twenty years have gone by. The forge fires are still glowing; business is good: Christian has prospered. One of the three little brunettes has gone to America with her husband, from whence she wr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

bflw Lili iJ THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 1le Apgel of plirgatory. HOW MANY SWKITT REMINISCENCES THIS TITLE RECALLS TO A CHRISTIAN MIND. The Voice of the Holy Souls. "Mourn for the mourner, and not for the (lend; We nre in sorrow, and they nre at rest; In the hind of the living their portion is sure, In the land of the dying we linger in dread; Here the world and its dangers forever allure' But the dead that die in the Lord nre blest!" Cease from your sorrowing, henrts that nre brenking; Henr the snd voices from Limbo's dark cell "Help us our brethern, who still have the power; All self-love forgetting, your own griefs forsaking, Remember the exiles who long for the hour When safe in God's bosom forever they'll dwell. "For Infinite Purity one must be pure Every spot is discerned by the All-seeing Eye. All willing and gladly the soul wings her flight To this 'Sojourn of Hope,' for there she is sure The flame of the crucible, searching and bright, Can alone make her worthy in God's light to l...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. she bears them and the sympathy she feels for their sufferings, whilst her power to make these the sentiments of her compassionating Heart in their regard available unto their relief and deliverance is truly that of an Empress. It is not, therefore, without just reason that Dante represents the souls in his Purgatorio singing that one, of all the hymns in honor of Mary, the very first sentence of which applies to her the titles of Queen and Mother: "Salva Keginn," on the grass and flowers, Here chanting, I beheld those spirits sit, "Who not beyond the valley could be seen.() But, from among all the Blessed Virgin's many titles not especially founded on her relations to Purgatory, that of Our Lady of the Sacred Heart is undoubtedly one of those that lend themselves with most appropriateness to this consoling doctrine. Our Lady of the Sacred Heart how every word overflows with meaning when we fancy it uttered by the souls in Purgatory or in their behalf! Our Lady ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

24- THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. bers of the glorious mrstical body of Christ. Thoy are still our brethren, and are still capable of participating in the merits acquired bjr the good works of their fellow-members. We are in that state in which our good works are meritorious. By them we merit for ourselves and by them we acquire merits which if our charity do but move us we may appty to the relief of those who need them and who may not gain them for themselves. These dear souls know this as well or better than we do, and is it possible that they do not look lovingly and yearningly to us, hoping that some good angel may move us to think of them and to do something that may relieve them the sooner from their probation ? Can we imagine the gratitude with which they accept even the smallest favor of this kind we may have to offer them ? For us what we would give them is a mere nothing. A prayer, an ejacula tion, a kind wrord, a penny given in charity. Above all a Mass offered for their benefit m...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

The Indian Advocate , Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol. VI. APRIL 1894. No. 2. BEAR AND FORBEAR. ImicIi others's burdens bear, And thou shnlt surely share, A home above; From every deed refrain That might gie others pain, And nought shall then remain Hut perfect love. 'Tis well we may not know How deep the weight of woe Which others bear; Hut shouldst thou wish to bless Each heart that's in distress, And soothe its bitterness, Bear and forbear. FR. CROQUET'S SAINTLY LIFE. "Go ye therefore, teach all nations, and behold I am with you -all days, even to the consumma tion of the world." Throughout all ages of Christianity from the time of the apostles downwards it has been the custom of our Holy Mother, the Church, to send forth zealous missionaries to far and distant lands to preach the gospel of Christ, and bring salvation to poor sinful creat ures wandering in the darkness of error, knowing not whence they come, or whither they were going on the un known ocean of lif...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

26 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ica, "the land of the free, and the home of the brave." Father Croquet took a final farewell of his two bon voyagours, and in company with the Archbishop, five priests and seven religiouses, sailed for Panama, and from there to San Francisco, thence to Oregon City, where they arrived on the 21st of October, of the same year, and where the first twelve months of Fr. Croquet's missionary career were spent. In 1860 he was sent to take charge of Grand Ronde mission, which post he has held ever since, and many and thrilling are the accounts which can be given of this good priest's trials and hardships. Al though quite advanced in j'ears when he first came, being 42 years old, he has nevertheless, through thick and through thin, stayed firmly at his post, and to-day we see the results of his labors all the Indians are Catholic to a man we have a fine church and schools in a flourishing condition; and when lately his grace, Archbishop Gross, favored us with a visit,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

r i THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 07 by sending trials and afflictions in order that thoy may be the better prepared to receive His favors. Little did Fr. Croquet think that thirty-five long years of his life would ever be spent in this God-forsaken locality, after all the powers of hell were let loose upon him in the commencement of his mission; little did he think that the whole of this wild country inhabited only by Indians, would through his perseverance become totally Catholic, and to-day, in his hoary old age, ho beholds his enemies, scattered to the four corners of the earth, and himself alive and well, revered and loved by his chosen flock, and respected by all classes of every creed and sect. In the early days there was no doctor on the reservation, so the good Father acted as joint physician of the Indian souls and bodies he sometimes was assisted in this charitable work by the venerable Dr. Brentano of St. Paul, the father to the present agent. When the doctor would arrive in Gran...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

28 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. McDonald, would walk three miles to church and hoar confessions till 11:30 a.m. He would then say Mass, preach and teach catechism until 3 p.m., with out ever breaking his fast. In order to take a short cut homo, he would some times venture to go in a dir'ect line to his house, but had to trespass on the property of a certain Bavarian, who would not permit him to pass, and so he was obliged to make good his retreat and retrace his steps in the direction whence he had come, and then foot it all the way back home again, where breakfast, dinner and supper would, like the shamrock of old Ireland, be made three in one. When in St. Paul, Fr. Croquet was the sole possessor of an old bay mare, and once the old animal took French leave and skidaddled. Its owner set out on foot in its pursuit, and after trudging about a good deal, at last sight ed the old nag in the distance. Hasten ing his steps and going close up to the animal to make sure of its identity, the good p...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 29 predestined her before all ages to be the Mother of the Savior of the world. And having called her to fill this most glorious office, He would not have her to be a mere channel of grace, but an instrument co-operating both by her excellent qualities and by her own free will, in the great work of our re demption. For thousands of years the world had been expecting the promised Messias. The fullness of time has now come. The eternal Father sends a heavenly mes senger to Mary, to treat with her of the mystery of the incarnation. She pro nounces the word "Fiat," "Be it done!" And the heavens open; the earth pos sesses a Savior; Mary has become the Mother of God. Years pass by. The time has arrived when the great sacrifice is to be con summated. We find Mary at the foot of the cross. With the dying breath of Jesus she receives the Church as an inheritance. She becomes our Mother. These are the two great titles which give Mary a claim on our veneration and affectio...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

80 TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. dashed against the rocks of adversity, look at the Star, call upon Mary. If the waves of pride, of ambition, of de traction, of anger, of avarice, or lust, threaten your soul, call upon Mary. If troubled at the sight of your manifold sins, frightened at the thought of the just Judge, you begin to sink into the abyss of sorrow and despair, think of Mary. Let her name be on your lips, let her memory be in your heart. If you follow her, you will not go astray; if you trust in her, you will not be disappointed; if she takes care of you, you need not fear; if she protects you and intercedes for you, you will safely arrive at the haven of eternal felicity. AVE MARIA ! Come, run with me, 0 stalwart youth and maiden ! And run with me, 0 children young and fleet! And even ye with years so heavy-laden. Now struggle yet to use your failing feet! Come, crowding forth from the lanes and alleys. Come hurrying out from all the fields and woods, And make your paths in all th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. SI looking fur a liar. He's got to bo a good one. As you seemed to be out of a job and dead broke T thought I'd tackle you. All the samo, however, I'll hit the right man inside of a week, and he'll make his fortune here. Best of schools, plenty of churches, 3ix rail roads, rich country, future Chicago, ten factories, cultivated society, purest of water, public parks, come with a rush, sold again. If you happen to meet a liar, send him down." When last heard from, the farmer was considering the applications of two chaps, who "wanted to make $20,000 easy," one was the A. P. A. man who forged a Papal encyclical, and the other was a "convert from Popery." The merits of each as a first-class liar were so evenly balanced that the wily hayseed will probably engage them to run to gether in harness. THE EASTER DUTY. The closing of the time for the ful fillment of Easter duty brings us face to face with a law as old as Christianity itself, a law that nothing can abolish, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

82 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Blood of Jesus Christ, the greatest and most Divine act that a Christian can accomplish, and which consequently requires of me that I he well prepared, perfectly pure, detached from every affection to mortal sin, and full of love for Our Lord. When we prepare for Confession, let us pray earnestly to obtain the light of the Holy Spirit to know our sins, and for a sincere con trition for having offended God, our one true Friend, from Whom we hold .all that we have and are, and before Whom our lives are as a "mist driven away by the beams of the sun." At this season let us pray earnestly that all those who are wavering may listen to the voice of their conscience, and come before the time for making the Easter duty expires, to gratify the longing of the loving and adorable Heart of Jesus by making a good confes sion and receiving Holy Communion. And may this Paschal Communion give us all the desire of frequent Com munion. You hear our Lord and Mas ter bidding you...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

THE IDNIAN ADVOCATE. 38 ''Physically and mentally I regard this tribe of Indians as superior to anv in North America. They are wonder fully clever at all kinds of industries, and there is nothing of the proverbial Indian slowness about them. They are in no way lazy, and are skillful, quick workers. They are adept silver smiths, and their work is both artistic and unique. The Navajo blankets are celebrated, and no tourist feels quite contented to leave our territory with out one. "The work of civilizing and evan gelizing the Indians is very gradual. It is a mistake to think one can transform an Indian into an American in one generation. Mere education without moral training, based on religious training, is, according to the opinions of those who know Indian character, worse than useless. The Indians need continual attention, and unless closely .watched fall back into superstition. The education of the Indians requires unlimited patience, and his evangeliza tion both patience and pray...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

- rifU'vwm'Fr i-WffflJ'JJl w; '"f 84. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Ttnffw TAKING A DROP. "Come in, Frank, and have a drop," said one Chicago man to another. "No, I'm afraid of drops ever since Tom Johnson died." "Well, what about Tom?" "He was one of the liveliest fellows in these parts. But he began the drop business in the saloon around the corner. It was a drop of something out of a bottle at first; but in a little while Tom took a few drops too many, and then he dropped into the gutter. He lost his place, he lost his coat and hat, ho lost his money, he lost every thing except his love for strong drink. Poor Tom! But the worst is to .come. He got crazy with drink one dajr, and the last time I saw him he was taking his last drop with a slipping noose around his neck. I have quit the dropping business. I have seen too many good fellows when whiskj' had the drop on them. They just took a drop from the bottle, then they dropped into the gutter, and then dropped into the grave. No rum seller ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

3& m TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 36 circulate lies against the Catholic Church, and poison the minds of the poor, whose heritage they now onjoy, against the monks, who are the guard ians of the poor and the constant advocates and champions of their claim. And so the world goes on! Can any one deny that the monks were good landlords? Protestant writers are all agreed on the matter. Some of the abbots were in debt and could not pay the levies of the secular power, because they, had "remitted the rents of manjf of their tenants. A pitiful tale, a bad season, always appeal od to the kindly monks. There were no evictions, no rack rents, no demands for grants of public money, no squand ering of income on the race course, or worse, no evasion of public duties. The land was for the support of the poor, and the monasteries fed the poor. Large sums were constantly handed to the king in time of war or stress. The monks did not lend to the State at five per cent. They did not throw the burdens, pr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1894

5gpjwrW"W? 86 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Tje Indian XdVocate Is a Review, published by the Hcnedlctinc Fathers of the Indian Territory, to plead the cause of the last remnants of the Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe; their progress in education uud religion; their occupa tions, imluFtrics, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statibtics, and other interesting matter that can not be found in any other publication. The proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting the Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart Post Ofllce, Oklahoma Territory. Ait-roved by Right Raw TIIEO. MEERSCIIAERT, Vicar Apostouc of Oklahoma and Indian Terkitoky. Subscriptions 50 Cents per Year. Single Copies 15 Cents. APRIL 1894. EDITORIAL AND LOCAL. As the subscription of many of our readers ended with the receipt of the January number, and as we have deci...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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