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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 290 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 March 1894

Horse Radish. How tbis spicy, flavor full appetizer— horse radish—would grow and expand, and fill the soil of an irrigated volcanic ash heap ! Who has tried it under irriga tion? A Missouri man grows it in the following fashion: "Plant ibe roots it) any good, loose soil, laying them in slanting, if they are long, taking care not to crook or double them. Cover up and hoe the weeds out till they get a good start. In digging follow the root till it gets small, then cut it off with a knife and let the rootlets sprout up and make another crop. I frequently manure the ground after diggiuir, and plant to potatoes. Keep them clean and let the horseradish come up afterward. I sell the mauufatured article oply, and do not raise the roots for the market. It is a paying crop." Spokane Echo. Mr. J. A. Shea, one of the Minneapolis commission merchants who attended the Spokane convention, tells the Tribune, of his city, that 'the Yakima and Walla Walla valleys raise some of the finest fruit you ev...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 March 1894

6 The STATE OF TRADE. The general merchandise trade of the country is improving under tbe influence of spring weather and better roads. But country merchants as a rule are buying carefully, and do not seem intending to overstock. Collections are reported fair in most of the states considering the scarcity of money and the low price of most farm products. The grain markets with wheat as a leader are dull with a downward tenden cy. Wheat in Chicago is .floundering about on a lower bottom than it has readied before. The case is little better in Liverpool and other foreign markets. Stocks are increasing at Minneapolis. A pool is running things at San Francis co and prices are not well established. We quote:—Liverpool, No. 1 California, 5s Id(.iss 2d; New York, March 59£ cts., May 611 cts, July 63£- cts: Portland, val ley, 86 cts per cental,. Walla Walla 75 cts ditto; San Francisco,9. per cental. Potatoes have dropped at Portland in consequence of large shipments to Cali fornia having- l...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 March 1894

STOCK ECONOMICS. Nevada cattlemen an; beginning to ship cattle quite freely, despite the low stage of the market. A dispatch from Reno dated the 14lh announced that on that date twenty-three cars of cattle and three cars of muttou sheep were shipped west. On the same train were shipped nine cars of cattle and seven of sheep bought in southern Nevada. An other train was expected through the same evening from Lovelocks, consisting of thiriy cars of cattle which had been fed in that vicinity. Two thousand head have already been shipped from there, with 4,000 yet on hand. All were des tined for the California markets. "It is an easy thing," says the Rural World, "to win the affections of intelli gence. An apple, a potato, a few lumps of sugwr Riven from the hand now and then will cause the horse to prick up his nan at the sound of the master's foot step, not with fear, but with a low, whkineying note of pleasure. The con fidenre of the noble beast thus gained will lead him to obey the s...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 March 1894

R THE RANCH. A Weekly Newspaper For Everybody Who Wants It PmcE—sl.oo a year iv advance. Worth—Two gold dollars. Conducted by E. H. Libby. Managing Editor, W. W. Cobbett. Published by the YAKIMA PUBLISHING COMPANY. EDITORIAL. OFFICES: NORTH YAKIMA, WASHINGTON. husiness offices: North Yakima. First Street. Seattle, Room 7, Hinckley Block. Tacoma,lll3, P:iclflc Avenue. RANCH SMALL TALK. The fruit buds are "sleeping" cool these nights, and that means nodding boughs in autumn. Horticulture at the World's fair cost the state $9,810; mining, $12,212; forestry, $1,328, and the "administration" end of the affair drew on the appropriation for $23, --933. What a difficult and laborious thing it is to disburse public money!" If 1894 does not prove to be a fruitful year in Eastern Washington then all signs will fail. Old settlers are unanimous in the opinion that there will be an abund ance of fruit of all sorts and of superior quality. The hop men are equally sanguine of a successful outcome, ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 March 1894

THE INTERVIEWER. The Odorous and the Sweet-How to Grow Onions on Sub-Irrigated Land- Preparation of Soil, Seeding, Culti vating, Harvesting, Etc.—Beekeeping Experience—Messrs. Rock and Lee the Interviewer's Victims. H. F. Rock has given the Interviewer some important points on onion culture that Ranch readers, especially the new comers, will appreciate. He lives "out on the school section" southwest of North Yakima. In response to the usual interrogatory as to his "age" in this county, Mr. Rock said "a little over four years." '•Have you been ranching all the time?" "Yes; "the first two years I was a renter. I came from the Wolverine state and had much to learn, and tried my hand before contracting for a purchase. I haye been on the section for two sea sons." "How many acres have you, and what kind of farming are you doing?" "I have nineteen acres, and am grow ing hops, alfalfa, potatoes, fruit and garden vegetables." "You have had considerable exped ience with onions, I understand?...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 March 1894

10 business. I begin dividing about the Ist of May in usual seasons." "After tbe willows what are the next bee flowers?" "The peacti and other fruit blossoms follow; then the locust and the small berries; alfalfa about the middle of June. We get some white clover along the ditches." "What is ■ fair honey yield?" "If I get an average of fifty pounds of honey from my colonies, spring count, I think I am doing fairly well." "What is honey worth here as a gen eral thing?" "About 18 cents wholesale for comb honey; 11 to V 2 for PS racled; say an ay erageof 15 cents per pmind." "Do you Cd.ll this a good bee country?" "I do, but hardly as good as a white sage country, like California or Arizona perhaps, but good." "Are bees good tempered here, or do they seem inclined to use their "busiuess end" too much?" "They are very tractable here, much more so than ill California, and it is a great advantage, especially to beginners or to ladies who desire to engage in bee culture." "What hive do you...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 March 1894

POULTRY ftANCtt. rOur Poultry Editor is Harry H. Collier. No. \m C St., Tacoina. Address him on all Poul try matters.] FOWL PICK-UPS. Do not forget to watch for lice, for the little pesls are always on hand. Give them a good dose of coal oil on the roosts and in the cracks around the house, and they will make themselves scarce. Spade up the runs of your chicken yards and feed the grain by scattering in the newly-turned earth. On pleasant days the fowls will break up every sod looking for stray kernals, which will give them good, healthy exercise. Do not allow your chicks their liberty in the morning until the sun has dried off the grass. Dews are dangerous to the little fellows. A good feed for young chicks is cracked wheat or corn. If you have no hand mill, put some in a cloth, hold it tightly and beat up with a hammer. To watch the little chicks enjoy it will pay you for your trouble. The severe weather last month was very trying on young homing pigeons hatched the latter part of ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 March 1894

12 THE DOORSTEP. By Edmund Clareuce Stedman. The conference-meeting through at laat, We boya around the vestry waited To see the girls come tripping past, Like bnnw-birds willing to be mated. Not braver he that leaps the wall By level musket-flashes litten, Than I who stepped before them all Who longed to see me get the mitten. I Jut no, she blushed and took my arm! We let the old folks have the highway, And started toward the Maple farm Along a kind of lovers' byway. I can't remember what we said, "f was nothing worth a song or story; Yet that mdc path by which we sped Seemed all transformed and in a glory. The snow was crisp beneath our feet, The moon was full, the fields were gleaming; By hood and tippet sheltered sweet, Her face with youth and health was beaming. The little hand outside her muff, O sculptor, if you could but mold it! — So lightly touched my jacket-cuff. To keep it warm I had to hold it. To have her with me there alone, — "Fwas love and fear and triumph blended. ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 March 1894

gwift way, was putting clean linen on the bed. "Ain't it jolly?,' Tcm said, enthusi astically. "Making a flre?" answered Mary saucily*. "No. I say, darling." sitting down on the floor as the idea struck him; ':I neyer asked you if you would like to have Aunt Jane here." "Don't be a goose. Tom." "But, seriously, now, will it bother yjou?" I suppose I could get her a room in some stunning, tip-top boarding house, more like'her own home than our bird cage, but " "Well?" Mary said, instantly grave." "It would be so lonesome. She has a quick temper, I know, but she is so kind, and she does love me." "Poor thing," said Mary. "I wonder if she's very poor?" "She won't know it while we have a home or a cent, will she, Mollie?" "Of cousre not, Tom, and if you dare to talk about a boarding house again I'll stop your allowance of mince pie." "Mary, you're an angel!" cried Tom, springing up. "My flre is out again. I'm awfully glad we called the baby Jane, Mollie." "Tom, make that fire!" said Mar...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 March 1894

14 A NEW SYSTEM FOR DRYING HOPS. Something for Hop Growers to Think About—Drying by Steam Heat—lts Ad vantages, Etc.—A Proposition to the Yakima Hop Growers' Association. Eds. The Ranch: Progress is always more or less hampered by the skepticism of the unthinking follower of the meth ods established by our forefathers, and the hesitancy to leave the well worn rut, and take up with tlie untried, until driven to the improvements by popular opinion or sharp competition. ,It has been so since the beginuing of time. Samuel B. Morse, with his invention, required the most iodomoitable will to carry it beyond the line of theory to that of practicabil ity, in the face of the skepticism of that day, and few men there are but would have given up in despair. Xow the world would be in a qua miry to know how to get along without the electric telegraph. Now, I want to present some of the ob jectionable pomfs to the present system of drying hops, with the hope that I may be able to overcome them. F...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 March 1894

A SWEET PEA HEDGE. Hy Miss Annie Howard, of the Washington Agricultural College. If 1 could have only one flower in my summer garden, I would choose tbe Sweet Pea {Lathyrus Odoratux), or if there whs an unsightly paling fence in View—and who ever saw a sightly one — I should beautify it with a hedge of these pretty vines. Now is the time to plant, and the only preparntWn necessary, is to dig a trench about two feet deep and put in a gener ous supply of barnyard refuse; then fill up with a mixture of leaf mold and soil, or wood ashes and loam. Sow the seeds in a trench four or five inches deep, and when the vines are six inches high give support of trellis or of strings. If the seeds are sprouted before sown, the blos soms will come early in June; and if the plants are well watered and the blossoms clipped daily, there will be a profusion of flowers until frost. The Eckford hybrids are more satis factory than the common variety because their blossoms are larger and more bril liant, i...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 March 1894

i<s Prosser Falls Irrigated Lands Ist. There is, on account of the great growth of the country tribuiary to Prosser Falls, a demand for n distributing point. It Is the out fitting point for the great Sunnyside country, that is now being irrigated by the N. P. Co., of which Paul Schulze is president. This canal is 60 miles long, of which 42 miles are now completed. This canal is 30 feet wide on the bottom and carries «50 cubic feet of water per second of time. When fully completed it will irrigate 70,000 acres of land. , , .. m . . 2d. Piosser Falls is the starting point of the great Yakima and Columbia system of canals that will irrigate 7.),000 acres, throwing open to settlement a magnificent country. This canal is partially completed, and work is being done at the present time. 3d. Prosser Kails is the outfitting point for the great Horse Heaven wheat district, comprising 400,000 acres, of wnich only 10,000 are now cultivated, but later will support many thousand people. 4th. P...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 31 March 1894

THE RANCH ONE DOLLAR A YEAR. WEEKLY. A Journal of The Land and The Home in The New West. VOL. I. NO. 11. PROSPECTS. A flue, perhaps llie very best class of citizens, the more intelligent and pro gressive fanners, are brought into the country by the irrigation system. The reason is that only men ' of advanced ideas and intelligence can readily com prehend the conditions of agriculture under irrigation. Only such men dare to undertake its practice. When they do, and meet with the almost certain attend ant success, a community is established that is of an uncommonly high decree of civilization. Small farms and thickly settled districts augment the condition to an extent that has developed the almost idealic communities of the irrigated dis tricts of California, and the like of which are being built up in the Inland Empire of Washington. Oregon and llaho. • * * * Yes, we meant thai we believe that the blimate of the wet districts of the west boast is hot conducive to the develop ment Of...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 31 March 1894

2 tnrers of furniture, woodenware, ;<<:ri cultural implements, ship<. car*, etc., then indeed would the effort be well spent. There is ao opportunity In make western Washington in manufacture to the great agricultural regions ext ad ing from the Cascade mountains a thou sand miles eastward, and to Asia and Australia, what England is to Europe and India, what New England is to the eastern states. * * * The partition of the arid lands among the states at the rale of a million acres to each, as proposed in the United Slates senate, is a highly proper proposition. Better still, ami more justly it seems to us, would be to cede to the several west ern states all of the arid lands within their respective borders. Let this be done under conditions that would require the states acquiring them to sell them to actual settlers only, and in tracts of not more than eighty acres each, at moderate fixed prices and easy terms; also to ex pend at least half of the money realized from the sal...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 31 March 1894

The hop growers at the east begin to realize the danger threatening their in dustry by Pacific coast competition. From the Hop Grower's Journal, Hamil ton, N. V., we clip the following: "The rapid increase of the acreage and consequent enormous production of hops in the west are not the only facts the ladened zephyrs are bringing for the con sideration of the intelligent hop growers of this state. We may console ourselves for yet a little while by holding fast to the fact that New York produces the strongest and the best hop grown in the world. But we have rolled this one timed fact "like a sweet morsel under the tongue" until it is getting to be very much of a something else. If the grower has a scintilla of salvation in this alleged superiority of his product it is not to be seen in the markets of the world and it will be of no help to him in the contest that is to come. Facts thai mv facts are proverbially stubborn things; tliey com pel attention and will not be ignored. The stea...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 31 March 1894

4 WATER RIGHTS. Under the heading "The Right to the Use of Water," Judge James Kerr, of New York, gives, in the March issue of Irrigation Age, a digest of the law upon this subject. The Age vouches for Mr. Kerr as being one of the best posted men on irrigation law id the east. The Judge opens by Baying that it is au elementary principle of law thai air, light and water are the common property of all mankind; that is, belong to no one in particular, but to the public at large. The right to use is the only right that can be acquired, and this is not a proprietary right, but simply an easement. In this country private interest is secured only by act of congress, by statute or by pre scription. The right to the use of the water is re stricted to the reasonable wants of the individual or company, and is held sub ject to the great fundamental principle of "liot interfering witb the rights of others." "Water cinnot be appropriated and taken for any use which is purely pri- Vate and does no...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 31 March 1894

to mature, is good in quality, (a few plants rotted during the season) is valuable for early use, as it bleaches very quickly afttr banking up. White Plume—Heads small, requires but little banking up. Matured a few days later than Golden Yellow. The quality is Dot so good as some others. Its whiteness makes it easy of culture, and it is becoming quite popular for early use. Solid Ivory.—An excellent variety. Stands winter well without rotting, has a good nutty flavor, is free from stringines.s. Heads quite large, valuable for late use. Grant Pascal.—Resembles the Solid Ivory in flavor an texture; head does not grow so large as the former, but nutlets a very solid, ouip'aot growth; as the season ad vances becomes quite pithy. THAT RED APPLE ORCHARD A thoroughly posted eastern Washing ton fruit grower who is a close and appre ciative reader of Thk Ranch and a true friend to the orohardists of the county writes as follows concerning varieties now talked of for this part of the state: I...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 31 March 1894

6 WAYSIDE NOTES. Horsemen Eorn, Not Made-Three Ways of Riding Horseback-How the Horse Stands it-A Sensible Man's Care of His Beast-The Hop Politicians' Hulla baloo-Nobody Frightened by Talk—No Disaster Feared. By an old Sagebrtub Booster. Did you ever notice the difference In the way men ride :i horse? If not. the horse couM give you Rome pointers on the subject if he had any way of ex pressing his good horse sense. One man bestrides an animal wilh all the ligidity of a satrbuck and goes jolting along with about aa much elasticity as a post fastened to a pair of stakes. Another ails as limp and lifeless as a dead hog in July, while another rides elect., pliant and BpringV, each muscle atune to every move me ut of his mount, easy and grace ful as the bareback rider of the olden circus, riu: first jars i\m\ pounds the horse out of all patience, fretting him till the weal rolls down his Hunks; the second wearies and worries the animal until he is completely fagged out ueforc the day's ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 31 March 1894

WANTS Of the Yakima Country—Pienty Of Room For Them All. A fruit and vegetable cannery, A movement i* now on foot for Its establish ment at once. A starch factory. Our '11 per cent po tatoes arc the best In America for the purpose, and can be grown at a profli for 25 cents a bushel. A bnlf-dozen big fniil and vegetable evaporators. Public (merchant) Imp kilns. Numer ous bid nil rancbers would pntrouiz \ (bent. A dozen creameries t»nd cheese fac tories. The one Jiere has had remarka ble success. More are promised soon. A woolen mill to U3e tin: product of I lie big bands of .sheep on Ibe bills. The raw material and the market arc. both here. A beef and pork packing establish ment, to use the animals bred on the ranges and fatted on the alfalfa in the valleys and grasses of the hills; 10,000 beeves can be finished oil' here next winter. A beet sugar factory. Hiyh test beets have been produced here, and an exten sive experiment is now going on in the same direction to make assurance su...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 31 March 1894

8 THE RANCH. A Weekly Newspaper For Everybody \vii<> Wants it Piucb —tl.oo a j*ear In advance. Worth —Two gold dollar?. Conducted by E, 11. Libby. Managing Kdltor, \V. W.COBBRTT. Published by the YAKIMA PUBLISHING COMPANY. EDITORIAL OKi'it'FS: NORTH YAKIMA, WASHINGTON. r.rsiNK.ss OFFICES! North Yakinm. First Xt ivi-t. Scuttle, Koom 7, HlDCtcley Block. Tuconui, 1113, Pacific Avenue. RANCH SMALL TALK. My! but ar'nt the tree roots going into the ground at v lively rule these warm spring days ! Are the laterals ceaned out for the corning water? Five copies of Till': Ranch, one year, $4; Four copies, three months, $1. Nature in tliis part of Ibecountry post poned her Easter decorations to a later date. From a commercial view, Nature did a very sensible thing. Later bloom means bloom's perfection—the matured fruit next autumn. Do you know the ladybird when you see her? If not, got an in'roduction; she is your friend and the particular enemy of the green aphis th;it destroys tender v...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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