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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1902

EBENEZER SHORROCK. E. Shorrock, whose photograph we present on first page, is one of Seattle's active, prosperous and prominent busi ive prosporous and prominent busi ness men. He was born 42 years ago in Lancashire, Hug., and graduated as B. A. of the London University. Before coming to the Uniteu States he secured a thorough business train ing in London, Liverpool and Man chester. In 1896 he was sent from the East by the Land Mortgage Bank of Northwestern America to take charge of its extensive investments in this state, of which he still has en tire charge. In the winter of 1900 Mr. Sfoorrock organized the Northwest Trust & Safe Deposit Co., capital $25,000, of which he is president and manager. Mr. Shorrock's idea was and is that while as a business grows its capital must expand; the ultimate and per manent success of such an institu tion depends more upon the charac ter, the ability and the conservative ness of its officers than upon the amount of its capital, and hence par...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1902

6 HOW TO SECURE A STAND OF CLOVER. We have written so much about clo ver growing for the last fifteen years that we had assumed that the farmers who had been reading after us know everything that we know about it, and possibly more too. When, however, we attend an institute, as we did last week, the same old questions come up. The farmers want to hear that clover story once more. We will try and make it so plain and simple that a child can understand it. First, secure seed that is not spoil ed; in other words, seed with germi nating power; or to put it plainer still, clover that will grow. Any clo ver seed will grow if you give it a chance. Any clover seed will grow if it has not been frozen or otherwise spoiled. To know just what per cent, will grow, get a soup plate from your wife, fill it with sand; then pour wa ter on it till it runs off. then count out 100 clover seeds and put them on the sand. Borrow a pie pan from her, turn it upsidedown over it and set it under the stove. In...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1902

first winter, to sway with the wind and wear a hole around the trees down to the roots, thus retarding the growth the first year. This argument would be unanswerable were there no way to prevent such a result. Well informed horticulturists have been, of late years, planting smaller trees than they once did —not smaller of the same age, but those of a younger growth. A well grown tree, large of its age, of two or three years from bud or graft, is preferred to a four year-old, and offers less surface for the wind's action, but all newly plant ed trees, whether set in spring or in autumn, should have a mound of earth packed around them before win ter ten or twelve inches high, not only to prevent the swaying of the trees, but also to prevent the access of mice to the bark of the trees. Salt For Pear Blight. Knowing of some test cases in the use of salt to combat pear blight, and that the salt application has had a most beneficial effect, we deem that we should give evidence to the publ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1902

8_ LAKESIDE STOCK FARM. Editor The Ranch: Scappoose, Or., 1 send you by separate cover a cut of my two herd bulls, one a year ling and the other a two-year old. Both gets of Lunde, Oregon, De Kul H. H. B. No. 25563. First prize two year old at the Oregon State fair in 1901, and first prize herd 1902, and was first prize at Washington State fair, and head of first prize herd. His gets have won first and second prize two years in succession at Oregon State fair, and first and second at Washington State fair in 1902. Lunde Oregon De Kol is one of the best Holstien bulls in America. His mother, Cothilde, Lunde Artis, No. 39867 A. R. 1297 is one of the best representatives of the breed. She won second prize in the seven days' of ficial Pan American Butter Test, which was conducted by Professor H. H. Wing of Cornell University and Pro fessor F. Hickman of Ohio Agricul tural Experiment Station. She had been in milk 72 days at the beginning of the test, she milked 407 lbs. and 13 1-3 lbs. b...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1902

trict can be taken as a reliable basis for the whole country, and we see no reason why they may not, the shrink age for the month of October is less than 3,600 tubs as compared with the same month in 1901. The number of retail licenses taken out in the Chicago office from July 1 to October 31 was 2,446, while the en tire number for the whole of last year was 2,452. —New York Produce Re view. Milk-Condensery Prices. Mr. E. B. Willey, who travels for one of San Francisco's creamery sup ply houses, is a native of New Berlin, New York, where is located one of the plants of the Borden Condensed Milk Company. He has recently re ceived from there an account of what the dairymen receive for their milk from the condensry people, says San Francisco Dairy Produce. In October last the price was $1.45 per hundred pounds; November, $1.55; December, $1.65; January, $1.65; February, $1.50, and March $I.4o—an average of $1.53 for these winter months. In 1895 the Borden Condensed Milk Company put in ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1902

10 THE ALL AROUND FARMER. By an all around farmer we mean the man who cannot only raise grain to the full capacity of his land during any season, but can also turn this grain into meats of various kinds ac cording to his taste and the wants of the market. In other words, not mere ly a grain grower, but a stockman who understands breeding, growing and finishing stock, as well as producing the grain, grass and forage with which to finish them, says Wallace's Farmer. There are some men who are splendid grain growers, but for lack of skill in breeding and fitting live stock are obliged to sell their corn and other grain at market prices. It is worth more to them as raw material than as a finished product, while there are oth er men in the same neighborhood who can buy this grain at market prices and by feeding it make money by con verting it into meats. The all around farmer has his in nings this year. The farmer who can raise nothing but grain is at a tre mendous disadvantage. The seas...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1902

The Old Girl Who Raised Hens. Mrs. E. M. Boyer. My experience in breeding pure bred poultry in the arid region has been a startling success, yet when I first came to the far west I was as sured that pure-bred chickens would >t do at all well here. I determined that they would do and had no in tention of raising such blots upon the landscape as my neighbors had propa gated in the way of chickens. The right kind of breed no doubt had something to do with my success. I selected Black Minorcas and Black I.angshans. I had eggs when no on< else had them and the diseases of which the neighbors complained never came within my chicken hor izon. I won premiums far from home, made money by selling breeding stock and hatching eggs, and proved to the breeders of Plymouth Rocks that for fineness and tenderness of grain the flesh of black birds for the table has no equal. Of course the Minorcas must be bred for size as well as foi points and a cross with the Langshan makes a faultless table ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1902

1 2 SEE CONAMT'S ADV. You couldn't keep W. A. Conant, the Kittitas Shorthorn breeder, out of our advertising columns with a club. He has been an advertiser with us too many years, and knows how it profits him. He says: "I don't raise kind animals, neither do I raise big lumps of tallow on legs with loud-sounding names. But I have the uniform, even fleshed, smooth cattle that don't know the taste of grain, and are acclimated here and will do much better work than imported stock." DOES IT PAY? Sunnyside, Wash.. Nov. 20, 1902 — Does it pay to fatten hogs on grain? Mr. J. A. Rush, living one mile and a half east of Sunnyside has a large herd of swine grown on alfalfa. At the high price of grain he was unde cided whether to fatten the hogs or sell them for stockers. One week ago he weighed two shoats and put them in a pen and fed them wheat chop, soaked —all they could eat. When they were put in they weighed 114 and 109 pounds, respectively. Seven days later they weighed out 134 and 129,...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1902

HOW THE LOGGED OFF LANDS OF WESTERN WASHINGTON MAY BE MADE PROFITABLE. [Bf Trof. D. A. Bfttdte, Supt. of Puynl lup Experiment Station.] There are thousands of acres of land in western Washington from which all the good timber has been taken, and which is growing up to brush and briar so thickly in many cases, as to preclude even grass from growing. Such land as it now stands. is practically useless for anything. Not only so, but such land is taxed to a greater or less extent, according to the location, and in most cases the tax- j ea amount to more than the receipts from it. Now this land may be made to bring in good returns if handled properly, and the best means for doing this that I know of is the use of Angora goats. In the Willamette valley, where these animals have been in use for more than 30 years, there are hun dreds of thousands of acres of land, now in cultivation, that were cleared almost entirely by goats. What has been done in tne Willamette valley may be done here, wh...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1902

14 Our Bad Roads Cost us the Enormus Sum of $650,000,000 Every Year. Poor roads in the United States are costing the people annually the enor mous sum of $650,000,000, which is a tax of more than seven dollars a year for every man, woman and child. This amazing fact is pointed out by Martin Dodge, director of the bureau of public road inquiries, of the Department of Agriculture, in Washington. He ad vocates the construction of brick track roads with convict labor. As a result of the good road move ment which has been largely stimu lated by the efforts of t-e Department of Agriculture, the road question is at present receiving a remarkable degree of active interest, as indicated, for instance, by a movement in the State of New York for bonding the State for $80,000,000 to build country roads. This is wnolly in line with a bill be fore the last national Congress by Mr. Otey of Virginia, for $100,000,000 for the same purposes. Mr. Otey declares: —"In view of our willingly having spent ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1902

which is now so alarmingly on the increase. "While the ideal conditions for road construction are very simple, they have heretofore seemed impossible to fully combine in any one system of road or street work. However, it is gratifying to note that all of the im portant features seem to have been in the brick wheel track road. "A special feature of this road is that the bricks which form these tracks are so placed as to bring the upper edge of each brick into con tact with a straight edge resting upon its neighbors. On these tracks nearly as great a load can be hauled as on a steel rail —in fact, it presents nearly every advantage of the steel rail with out its liability to rust from moisture or warp from heat. Horses Between Tracks. "While the wheel tracks themselves are somewhat slippery in icy weather, as is the case with brick paved and asphalted streets, the tracks are so narrow that the horses will usually walk between them, where good foot ing may be found. In this respect a m...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1902

16 JJ- Why don't you send to Mm ■ JitluMogardustfa : - I |l| " **~^ < ■ - I iHF , For the finest SEED catalog ever printed in the West. Its a I W money-saving book for the farmer who buys. 1 1 • Eggs are high. Now is the f 5mA w .. ;f ,,^^ yi<r: , _, ~,ji i± |l to use Midland Poultry Food W^ff^^^^^^^^m^Sm \gfis^ The only Scientifically Prepared and jggjjjjjijjjijg^jßjij^^ Properly Balanced Ration for Poultry. . -^ ■■ . 0% *% • , -_— . MIDLAND BRANDS , lO £| 1J° I 0811111$ & COmpaH^S & KOW-KURE i—Nursery Chick Food. *» i;'" I miuii IICIIC fi||. ■* iwr\& j^ — Growing Chick Food. "M . ■ ANIMAL MEALS wIl FILLS THE J|SP ■ 3— Fattening Chick Food. M^?H Alun RFFF *W*BAP ißk UDDER Mm — Egg and leather Producing rood. c; 6O ■ mIL. JiM!? 5 —Nursery Duckling Food. S( J ! I will make hens lay— not by "dosing" them «^^t. £. /i . k. ii* i ;;"« with drugs, but by giving them the <<mW 6—Growing Duckling Food. M4O I proper material from which to \^^ 7 —Fattening Duckling and ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1902

* mmmmmmimmmmmmmmmm^ —— wmimtmmmmmrw^wrrtx'.'.'.. './'..■■ ■■"..: ??.."■..■'! '■■■■'■j.11- ! —■"*""■;""'■""*!.. ■.;'"'■'':T.!I'.'I 7'T."I> " 'M Nineteenth Year THE HARVESTER TRUST—"ITS ALL IN DER FAMBLY" "If you don'd like my binder mit der fly-wheel, buy me broder's mit der right-hand cut |" SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, DEC. 15, 1902. Subscription $1 Pmr Year Worth Two Gold Dollars

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1902

1 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SECRE- TARY OF AGRICULTURE, 1902. Tho secretary opens his report with a reference to the educational work of the Department, which he says has grown in effectiveness since his last annual report. He finds that the de mands of many public institutions for men to conduct research in scientific fields and for ability to manage agri cultural enterprises encourage young men to take advantage of the oppor tunities thus afforded. The teaching of the science of agriculture and of the sciences relating to it are receiving more attention in the colleges insti tuted tor that purpose, many of which have neglected their full duty in the past. Weather Bureau Warnings for Rural Mails. The past year affords gratifying evi dence of the value of forecast warn ings of the Weatuer Bureau in saving life and property. Ample testimony is afforded that the value of property thus saved from loss amounts to many times the cost of maintaining the Bureau. The secretary urges the de sirab...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1902

rtfE RANCH A.Jw^.sr J n^^*Svt^<iHTiitt<wWuT-- With which Is consolidated The Washington Farmer, The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfman. Official organ of the State Dairymen's Associa tion and the State Live Stock Breeders' Associa tion. MILLER FREEMAN, - Editor and Manager. Editorial Offices: - - - Seattle, Wash Tel. Main 1265—Long Distance Connection. Issued Ist and 15th of each month. BUSINESS OFFICES: Seattle Metropolitan Bidg., Cor. Third and Main Sts. Spokane - Alexander & Co., 621 First Aye Subscription (In advance) 81.00 per year. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscrip tions. Good commission and ealaries paid. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an or der to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notified In writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot tind it on our list from the name alone on the pa per. We must ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1902

4 FROM PROF. SPILLMAN. Washington, D. C, Nov. 29, 1902. Editor The Ranch: Yours of No vember L'dth at hand. It is like a breese from tin1 West to see the famil iar letterhead of The Ranch. There is never a day passes but what I think of you and the other friends in Wash ington State, though 1 have been so busy since coming here that I have had almost no time for writing to the newspapers. I keep resolving that in the near future 1 will turn loose again and flood the newspapers with matters Ii om my pen, but I find myself becom ing quite a Spaniard- —everything is "manana" (tomorrow). Some day I will surprise you with something for the benefit of your readers. I get the great farm and family journal regular ly, and I assure you that I read it with the greatest of interest. I expect to have two articles in the forthcoming yearbook; one on the hay crop of the country, and the other on systems of farm management in differ ent parts of the country, which I hope will be of interest to the...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1902

PUBLISHER'S DESK. McDonald-Bown Co., 914-16 Western avenue, agents for Studebaker vehic les, will send you a very handsome 1903 calendar postpaid, if you give them your address on a postal and mention The Ranch. Lilly, Bogardus & Co. have ready for distribution their 1903 seed cata log. You ought to get one —and can, too —by writing for it. Might mention the Ranch. Fetcher & Janeck's Mountainview ranch, North Yakima, can furnish sev eral fine young pure-bred Jersey bulls at right prices. They are of the best butter strains, and just the sort to head special purpose dairy herds. Write them for prices. International Stock Food Co. is sending out a handsome lithograph showing a view of the 600-acre farm owned by M. W. Savage, proprietor of that company. In the foreground is the barn which has just been built, and which has attracted so much at tention. The plan is like the half of a wheel, five sheds reaching out from the "hub" like spokes. It was designed in this original styl...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1902

6 HORTICULTURAL NOTES By F. Walden. How a living language grows and changes. Originally Horti culture meant garden culture as distinguished from field culture which was designated as Agriculture. Horticulture now means fruit culture whether in the garden or the field. It is in the modern sense that I shall use the word in these notes. The growth of fruit growing is one of the marvels of the age in which we live. A hundred years ago apples were not grown for commercial purposes and the same was true of all kinds of fruit. That some fruit was sold in nearby towns is undoubtedly true, but to grow it for shipment all over the land and to foreign countries, was a thing unknown. With the increase of its growth there has been an increase of its consumption. And the latter has been equal to the former. And further, it is altogether probable that the two will go hand in hand in the future and no one now living will ever see the day when the growing of good fruit will be an unprofitable busin...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1902

NEW LIGHT ON HEREDITY. Two years ago in London there was held the first International Conference on Plant Breeding and Hybridization. The meeting was so successful that it was determined by the recently organ ized Horticultural Swiety of New York to hold the next International Conference in the United States. This was done September 30th, and Octo ber Ist and 2nd, 1902, at the Berkeley Lyceum building, in the rooms of the American Institute of Art and Science, in the city of New York. The writer ahd the privilege of attending every session of the conference by authority from the regents of education of South Dakota, and it was indeed a great priv ilege. More than fifty papers were presented In full or by title. There were delegates present from England, the West Indies, Jamaica, Canada, and various parts of the United States. Pa pers were sent from Ireland, Scotland, Austria, Holland and France. It is im possible to give a brief synopsis of the many valuable papers presented, many o...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 December 1902

8 THE AMERICAN'S COUNTRY HOME. ?*JJ?.: h^£*r*ZZ Some Pen Pictures and Contrasts. Tho Charm of Rural Life. Let me recall a scene which has lingered in my mind from boyhood. I was riding on horseback tlirough one of the most remote and thinly settled pints of Indiana —the Brown county hills. The land was thin and poor, covered with a scraggy hardwood forest with a dense growth of under brush- hooppoles, the paw paw and the hazel bush predominating. Here and there a struggling chestnut oak —the tanbark tree —had escaped the almost universal destruction. Every mile or so there was a little "clearing," planted to corn or tobacco which gave promise of a scanty crop of "nubbins" and fodder, ot a few plugs of "long green." The rude log huts with stick and mud chimneys were forlorn evidences of the presence of man. Through the dirty and broken-down door way tow-head urchins in bare feet peered wonder ingly at the passing stranger. In other "clearings" the cabin was wholly deserted and the ro...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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