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Elephind.com contains 4,505 items from 885, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Trial By Error? [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

Trial By Error? Something new came to the Newton campus this fall —"885." Its birth year is almost over —a year of trial and perhaps of error. But like parents who always see the better side of their offspring, the staff thinks it was a good year. We only hope that you do too. Perhaps you didn't reccive your issue last month, or we left your name off the list of the varsity hockey team last November. We ask for your patience, and remind you that you, the college, are older and wiser than we —six years advanced from your infant steps. The aim of "885" is to give you accurate and we hope enjoyable news coverage of coming and past events. We have tried to describe its growth and development and to show Newton's importance as a college, and we have attempted to put Newton on the map by circulating the paper on the campus, to alumnae and friends off campus, and in other colleges. Whatever success we may have achieved will have to be evaluated by your continued interest. We thank all our ...

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
We All Move Up [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

We All Move Up Newton, like colleges and universities all over the country, is the scene of Commencement this June —a scene of beginning. Beginning of what, we mav ask. Commencement especially involves the Seniors who will begin their post-college life after four years on the Newton campus. Shakespeare would say that they were taking their parts on the stage of players. The setting for each may be different; some will be making their own homes, some will continue their studies; and yet others will enter professional careers in business, science, and teaching. But whatever field each enters, it will be a beginning—one for which Newton has equipped her to take her part as an educated Catholic woman. Commencement is also a beginning for each one of us remaining behind at Newton. It is the beginning of a new year —a year in which each student is advanced one step in her position within the College life. For the present Juniors, there is no visible sign of their promotion, unless the inw...

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
...COMING EVENTS—FALL, 1953... [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

...COMING EVENTS—FALL, 1953... September 16th—-Registration for Freshman Day Students, 2 P.M. September 17th—Registration for Freshman Resident Students, 9 A.M. till noon September 21st —Registration for Seniors, Juniors, Sophomores: 9-11 A.M. for Day Students; 1-3 P.M. for Resident Students September 17th—noon to September 22nd—Orientation Week for Freshmen; all Juniors are urged to return early to College to meet their Freshman sisters and to help orient them to college life. September 22nd —Mass of the Holy Ghost; opening of classes

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
The Lighter Side [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

The Lighter Side No one seemed to take any interest in Donna Haider's baby alligator, Seyek Rupert 111 until he was pronounced dead by his keeper several weeks ago. Then many gathered instantaneously and asked to be pall-bearers; but the whole business was a hoax —Seyek was still alive. The alligator is now with someone who enjoys his company, Mr. Joseph Ebacher, professor of French at Newton. A new kind of audience reaction was noted by Newton Players during their Neighborhood Day performance of "Beauty and the Beast." The first scene was interrupted by a howl from the Malleys' dog who had strolled in to see the Beast, after having lost his mongrel pal, Prince, who only that weekend had been sent to the pound for various misdemeanors around campus.

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Babies Sport On Lawn [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

Babies Sport On Lawn Thirty-five children, among them students' nieces, nephews, and friends, and families of the faculty members, frolicked on the lawn of Newton at the Annual Baby Party, given on Pentecost Sunday, May 24th, from 3:30 to 5:30 P.M. Multi-colored balloons hanging from the apple trees added to the appearance of a playground as children amused themselves on a swing and slide set up on the Circle for the occasion. Each child received a miraculous medal from Mother Kenny and a special Children's Blessing at Benediction following the party.

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Letter to the Editor [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

Letter to the Editor Dear Editor, I just wanted to write a word to the staff of the paper to tell you how much it means to us Alumnae to see a newspaper really coming off the presses of Newton already! You can't imagine that in the last two years since we have graduated, Newton has grown in spirit and accomplishment so much as to be able to get out a paper. I'm living with Pat Canning and Chic Laßonte, also from the first two graduating classes, and I just wanted to tell you that we're sending a very heartfelt word of congratulation. It seems hard to imagine that you are really "old" enough to be coming out in print, when I look back and think that only six years ago we were Freshmen and there was only one class ahead of us. I hope you are all loving every minute of College as much as we did, and getting as much out of it. In a couple of years you'll be looking back very wistfully and wishing it hadn't gone so fast. Well, good luck to all. I just wanted to tell you how good I think ...

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Among Ourselves [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

Among Ourselves Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Edward Craig, a daughter, on April 18th. The Craigs have three other children: Mary Ellen, 8: Edward, 5; Catherine,3. Born: To Mrs. J. Ennis McQuail, Jr. (The former Mary Ellen Keogh '54) a son, David Ennis, on April 25th, in New York. Engaged: Louise Lynch '53 to Ensign Joseph F. Conlon, Jr., a fighter pilot in the Navy Air Force. Engaged Francie Mannix '53 to Victor D. Ziminsky, Georgetown alumnus. Engaged: Helen Anne Muir '55 to Lt. Thomas Bertke, U. S. N., a Holy Cross Alumnus. Engaged: Alice Higgins '53 to William Slattery, Georgetown alumnus. Three Newton Seniors have won a total of thirteen scholarships for graduate study: Raminta Mantautas '53 has been awarded an Assistantship in the Physics Department of Marquette University, and an Assistantship in the Mathematics Department of Boston College Graduate School, which she is accepting. Raminta had previously been awarded an Assistantship in the Mathematics Department of Fordham. Birute Mi...

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Seven Receive E de M Medals On Day Of Recollection [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

Seven Receive E de M Medals On Day Of Recollection Commencement celebrations were preceded by a Day of Recollection on Thursday, May 28th, by Reverend Francis X. Weiser, S.J., for the student body. In the evening there was a reception of members into the Sodality of the Children of Mary. At 6:30 the Senior Banquet took place, followed by the presentation of the Senior Will and Prophesies. New members received into the Sodality were Seniors Louise Lynch and Pauline Madden; Juniors Dorothea Englert and Julie Fitz-Gerald; Sophomore Carolyn Morgan; and Freshmen Margaret Blinstrub and Joan Dillon.

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
1953 Commencement Marks End Of First Era [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

1953 Commencement Marks End Of First Era Fourth generation pioneers, the class of '53 had the distinction of being the first freshman class to have three classes above it. It has been their privilege to grow up with Newton from the time of the first graduation until now when she must expand. They have watched her develop to a recognized college. They have marked her increase in activity, both in clubs and in intercollegiate organizations. They have even witnessed the establishment of "885" as a statement of her importance! Caught up in Newton's young tradition of enthusiasm and cooperation, the class that was fourth in command worked as a unit, whether it was carrying chairs from Stuart to the Playhouse, cramming for logic examinations, or advancing the power of Student Government. Through logical arguments, compromise, and understanding, they have helped to find solutions for problems and to widen permissions. Ten o'clock lights, 6:3o's on campus, and proctors are all now obsolete....

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
A Senior Looks Back On Years At Newton [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

A Senior Looks Back On Years At Newton By Phyllis Hollar Three years ago I was junior mistress at the Convent oi Mercy Academy, teaching girls who were close to me in age, with the feeling of importance that tends to accompany such a situation. My vague plans were for the University of London or Toronto, hut in September of 1950 I found, myself bag and baggage, a Sophomore at Newton. With my set Island ideas of American skyscrapers and the world of jostled indifference living in them, Newton — the campus, the students and the iaculty — was as different as anything I could have dreamed. There were the gently rolling acres of which the handbook boasts, the stately buildings (only three stories high), the brook trickling by between Hardey and Duchesne, and everything was caught up in the gorgeous autumn colors I had only read about in Keats. As the new students became a part of life on campus, the impression of regimentation, the necessity of obeying rules, of curtailing shopping or mo...

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

Alfred Brown Studio More popular of the carnival booths was the "accessory" section, with Jamaican hats, gifts of Lucille Joy's mother, as the center of attraction. The affair, held on May 9th, netted $1000 for the Building Fund.

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Carnival Nets $1,000 Profit [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

Carnival Nets $1,000 Profit Booths, deckcd with blue and red trimmings and multi-colored balloons displayed religious articles, home-made foods, aprons, china cups and saucers, jewelry, knitted articles and knickknacks. A variety ol donated gifts and gay Jamaican hats and pocketbooks were among the commodities overflowing one of the booths. The Post Office Grab consisted of surprise gilts postmarked from various parts of the country and world. Pony rides were the main attraction for the children, some of whom appear- cd at the scenc rigged in cowboy outfits. Other entertainment was provided by games including balloon targets and a floating target for pennies. Palm reading by Lucille Joy, and handwriting analysis by Rose-Anne Dognin, attracted many customers and brought many laughs. Sandwiches, coke, and ice cream were served in the Tea House by Arleen Hanrahan, Winnie Weber, and Ursula Cahalan. Many other students also assisted with the event, along with Mrs. Charles Powell ol the W...

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Where 1954 Will Find The Class Of '53 [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

Where 1954 Will Find The Class Of '53 June —the month of brides. Commencements, and decisions. For thirtyeight seniors, it means decision -what to do alter their four years at Newton. Some Seniors are very definite, others are vacillating, and still others just don't know. But here's a profile of those that do. Several are continuing the scholar's life. Ann White is leaving Newton for Cambridge to take an M. A. at the Harvard School of Architecture. If you're touring the Capital next year drop in on Nancy Dolan at Georgetown. Phyllis Hollar will be studying in the English Department at Fordham University, and Raminta Mantautas will be near us at Boston College continuing her studies in mathematics. After a course at Katherine Cibbs in New York. Sis Berry will be ready for the business field, while Birutc. Micuta is leaving the Newton lab lor graduate studv in chemistry, either at Wellesley or Loyola. I::y Bucklcy and /■.Hie Murphy will remain roommates—but far from the halls of Bara...

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Senior Ball Held At Boston Club [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

Senior Ball Held At Boston Club Newton's annual Senior Ball will be held this year on the evening of May 29th at the Boston Club, Beacon Hill. The couples will dance beneath crystal chandeliers in the oak panelled Court of St. James Ballroom, said to be an exact replica of a room in Buckingham Palace. Ken Reeves' Orchestra will supply the music from nine until one o'clock. For the Seniors the Ball will be preceded by a dinner party given for the class by Pat Callahan at her home. The dance, a present to the Senior Class from the student body, is the final social event of their four years at Newton. Parents of several Seniors will be chaperons. Among them will be Mr. and Mrs. Sydney Lane, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Mannix, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. Higgins, Mr. and Mrs. Leo Whelan, and Mr. and Mrs. John L. Murphy. Many sisters and friends of the graduates, and the Alumnae who will be visiting Boston are expected to attend.

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Mrs. Balling's Music Pupils In Annual Spring Recital [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

Mrs. Balling's Music Pupils In Annual Spring Recital Music major Helen Ward Sperry, '54, opened the program with Chanconne in D by Bach-Busoni. Helen Ward also played two selections of Chopin. Helen Badenhausen, '54, also a music major, performed the Concerto in A Minor by Schumann. Mary Evans, '54 played two of her own compositions; Heimweh and a Lullaby. The class of '55 was represented by Elinor Reardon and Maria Christina Sanint. Elles played the Fantasy in C by Mozart, Maria Christina, the Beethoven Concerto in C. Francie Mannix, '53 sang "Mon coeur s'ouvre a ta voix" by Saint-Saens and the Negro Spiritual, "Nobody Knows". Aileen Mannix joined her sister in singing "Panis Angelicus." The Orchestra, consisting of First Violins Helen Ward Sperry and Helen Badenhausen; Second Violins, Joan Comba and Elinor Reardon; Violas, Mother Dora Guerrieri and Francie Johnston; and Cello, Louise Lynch, closed the program with a medley of College Songs.

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Preview of Newton In '73 Presented by Sophomores [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

Preview of Newton In '73 Presented by Sophomores "Someday there'll be T. V. sets in every suite," the Sophomores sang to open a musieal show presented by the class for the benefit of the Building Fund on Monday, May 4th in the Playhouse. The event netted $85 for the drive. The show began with a song giving the title of the production, Someday, and explaining the theme of the scenes to come: Newton twenty years from now after "the building took such a boom." Pat Donovan, who directed the show, and Lee McGrady pointed out these wonders of the future to be found in the drive's brochure. As an interlude between the present and future, six girls dressed as workmen gave the audience a musical interpretation of the building that we hope will soon be in progress. Paraphrasing the song, Look Who's Dancing, they sang of Newton's expansion, asking the audience to look who's building up to the sky. Representing present day students returning to their Alma Mater in twenty years, Rose-Anne Dognin...

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

Alfred Brown Studio Patsy Murray as the Nurse, Jane Slade, completely disguised as the Beast, and Eloise Welch, a frightened Princess, show one of the scenes which drew tears, shouts and sighs from an audience of more than 400 at the Children's Museum in Jamaica Plain on May Bth and 9th. A preview was put on for the younger guests on Neighborhood Day May 2nd, with equally appreciative reactions from the audience.

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Dramatic Club Presents Fairy Tale [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

Dramatic Club Presents Fairy Tale Members of Newton's Dramatic Club presented "Beauty and the Beast" in the Playhouse on Neighborhood Day, May 3rd, for the residents of the Newtons who were invited to visit the buildings and become acquainted with the campus of the College. The players also entertained audiences of four hundred children with their interpretation of the fairy tale at the Children's Museum in Tamaica Plain on May Bth and 9th. Eloise Welch played the Princess; Jane Slade, the Beast; Claire Cannifl and Gail O'Donnell, the wicked Sisters, Mary Ellen McKeon, the Queen; Patsy Murray, the nurse; Gloria Llaguno, the maid; and Hunsie Dempsey, the slave. The play was written lor the Dramatic Club by Margaret Murphy, alumna of Mahattanville College, Class of '50.

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Lecture Notes [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953

Lecture Notes The Reverend Gerard Yates, S. J., Dean of the Georgetown Graduate School, spoke to the students and faculty about the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, on April 20th. His organization ol the lactual matter made up most of the lecture. He stressed Europe as the focal point and its assumption of leadership in defense and supply. On May sth in the lounge, S. E. Gerard Priestly, distinguished Carnegie Lecturer on international and human relations talked on: "Can the British Empire Survive?" He placed emphasis on the rapid advance of technology and its effect on the size of the world, by asking "Do you people realize that you can eat breaklast at 8 A.M. in Piccadilly Circus, London, board a plane and eat breakfast again at the exact time, fi A.M., on the same day in New Yolk's Times Square:"' He indicated that adaptability to this advancement in science is the necessary condition lor the survival ol an empire. What he h( lieves has kept the British Empire strong is the po...

Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — 885 — 1 June 1953
Publication Title: 885
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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